Tristan Wakefield is seen rowing while wearing sunglasses and a syracuse university orange shirt. There is also a small image of the mascot Otto the Orange

[podcast src=”https://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/28318904/height/100/theme/custom/thumbnail/no/direction/forward/render-playlist/no/custom-color/445599/” width=”100%” scrolling=”no” class=”podcast-class” frameborder=”0″ placement=”top” primary_content_url=”http://traffic.libsyn.com/diabetesconnections/Ep_598_Final_Dexcom_U_Tristan.mp3″ libsyn_item_id=”28318904″ height=”100″ theme=”custom” custom_color=”445599″ player_use_thumbnail=”” use_download_link=”use_download_link” download_link_text=”Download the episode” /]

Going to college with type 1 is a big adjustment. Going to college as a student athlete with type 1 is on another level. You’ll hear from Syracuse University rower Tristan Wakefield about his schedule, how he manages T1D and how he and his parents worked ahead of time to make the transition as smooth as possible.

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

Find out more about Moms’ Night Out 

More about the NIL policy here: https://www.ncsasports.org/name-image-likeness

More about Dexcom U here: https://www.dexcom.com/en-us/dexcomu

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Take Control with Afrezza 

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Edgepark Medical Supplies

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

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Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

 

 

[podcast src=”https://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/28259333/height/90/theme/custom/thumbnail/yes/direction/forward/render-playlist/no/custom-color/3e9ccc/” width=”100%” scrolling=”no” class=”podcast-class” frameborder=”0″ placement=”top” primary_content_url=”http://traffic.libsyn.com/diabetesconnections/Ep_597_Final_The_Cost_Hogan.mp3″ libsyn_item_id=”28259333″ height=”90″ theme=”custom” custom_color=”3e9ccc” player_use_thumbnail=”use_thumbnail” use_download_link=”use_download_link” download_link_text=”Download the episode” /]A new movie’s in the works about diabetes called “The Cost”. It’s fictional, a thriller co-written and directed by Mike Hogan who lives with type 1.

Mike explains more about what the movie is about, how you can help it get made, and what it’s been like following a childhood dream that doesn’t include health insurance.

More info about The Cost here

Contact Mike directly at Mike@tallorderproductions.com

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

 

Find out more about Moms’ Night Out 

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Take Control with Afrezza 

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Edgepark Medical Supplies

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

Instagram

Twitter

Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

 

 

[podcast src=”https://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/28239689/height/90/theme/custom/thumbnail/yes/direction/forward/render-playlist/no/custom-color/3e9ccc/” width=”100%” scrolling=”no” class=”podcast-class” frameborder=”0″ placement=”top” primary_content_url=”http://traffic.libsyn.com/diabetesconnections/Ep_596_Final_In_the_News.mp3″ libsyn_item_id=”28239689″ height=”90″ theme=”custom” custom_color=”3e9ccc” player_use_thumbnail=”use_thumbnail” use_download_link=”use_download_link” download_link_text=”Download the episode” /]It’s In the News, a look at the top stories and headlines from the diabetes community happening now. Top stories this week: lots of news from the EASD conference, including info from Dexcom, Vertex, and more, the ADA issues new guidelines for CGM use at school around caregivers’ ability to follow, a new study says women should be screened at a younger age for type 2 diabetes, and congrats to Lauren Dahlin, who lives with type 1, for qualifying for the Ironman race in Hawaii.

Find out more about Moms’ Night Out 

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Take Control with Afrezza 

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Edgepark Medical Supplies

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

Instagram

Twitter

Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I’m Stacey Simms and these are the top diabetes stories and headlines happening now
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In the news is brought to you by Edgepark simplify your diabetes journey with Edgepark
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Lots of news out of EASD – the European Association for the Study of Diabetes happening this week. Including, a new trial finds that antiviral medications, when given soon after a child is diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, might help preserve those vital beta cells.

The team followed 96 children aged 6 to 15 who were all diagnosed with type 1 diabetes within three weeks prior to their enrollment in the study. The children were randomly selected to receive either the two antiviral medicines or a placebo for six months.

After one year of follow-up, the researchers found that C-peptide levels remained “significantly higher” in kids who’d gotten the antiviral treatment compared to those who hadn’t. That suggests the treatment helped shield the child’s pancreatic beta cells from destruction.

While C-peptide levels dropped a full 24% in children who received the placebo, it fell by just 11% in those who got the antivirals, the investigators found.

On top of that, 86% of kids who’d gotten the antivirals still produced their own insulin at a level that makes treatment with supplementary insulin easier, the team said, and is also known to be linked to lowered risks for diabetes complications.

The treatment appeared to be safe, with no severe side effects noted.

According to Mynarek’s team, their research supports the notion “that a low-grade persistent virus infection is an underlying disease mechanism, and that type 1 diabetes may be prevented by development of new vaccines.”

The researchers concluded that “further studies should be done at an earlier stage in the disease process, to evaluate whether antiviral treatment could delay the progression of beta-cell damage leading to clinical type 1 diabetes.”
https://consumer.healthday.com/type-1-diabetes-2665779376.html
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Also at EASD, an update on once a week insulin icodec for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. While several other studies have investigated once-weekly insulins in type 2 diabetes, this was the first data to be presented from a large-scale phase 3 study in type 1 diabetes.
The study, ONWARDS 6, included 582 people with type 1 diabetes who received either insulin icodec or insulin degludec. Participants had an average age of 44 years and an average diabetes duration of 20 years. Both the icodec and degludec group received basal insulin in combination with mealtime insulin (insulin aspart, or NovoLog) over a period of 57 weeks.

Overall, participants treated with once-weekly icodec and once-daily icodec had similar reductions in A1C of -0.5%, suggesting that this new insulin may offer another option for treating type 1 diabetes.

What were the key findings?
This study showed that insulin icodec was effective at reducing A1C in people with type 1 diabetes, although icodec did lead to higher rates of hypoglycemia compared to degludec.

Researchers are still investigating some questions related to the hypoglycemia events that occurred in this trial, such as how the time of injection and exercise may affect hypoglycemia.
https://diatribe.org/once-weekly-insulins-type-1-diabetes-latest-research-update
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Vertex Pharmaceuticals says a third type 1 patient no longer needs insulin after it’s investigational stem cell-derived therapy VX-880, being assessed for type 1 diabetes.
Two patients who had been followed for at least 12 months likewise met the study’s endpoint of the elimination of serious hypoglycemic events (SHE) between 90 days and 12 months.

Tuesday’s results follow an earlier data drop in June 2023, detailing the first two patients that achieved insulin independence and met the study’s primary endpoint.

The first patient achieved insulin independence 270 days into treatment, lasting through month 24 of the follow-up. The patient had type 1 diabetes (T1D) for “nearly 42 years,” according to Vertex’s announcement, and was taking 34 units of insulin daily.
Insulin independence came on day 180 for the second patient, persisting through 12 months of follow-up. The patient had T1D for 19 years and was taking 45.1 units of exogenous insulin daily. This patient had to restart insulin treatment at month 15, though at a much lower daily dose of four units.

The third patient stopped needing insulin at 180 days of treatment, which happened after the data cut-off, according to Vertex.

Aside from insulin independence, the new data from the Phase I/II study showed that VX-880 induced islet cell engraftment in all participants in parts A and B of the study at 90 days. In turn, these patients are now capable of endogenous glucose-responsive insulin production and demonstrated better glycemic control across various measures, including HbA1c and time-in-range.

Before receiving VX-880, all enrolled participants had long-standing T1D and showed no signs of endogenous insulin secretion and required 34.0 units of insulin per day on average, according to Vertex’s announcement on Tuesday. All patients also had histories of recurrent severe hypoglycemic events.

An investigational allogeneic stem cell-based therapeutic, VX-880 works by delivering fully differentiated and insulin-producing islet cells, in turn restoring the body’s glucose-responsive insulin production capabilities and boosting glucose control. VX-880 is designed to be delivered via an infusion through the hepatic portal vein. Patients need to be on an immunosuppressive regimen to receive the candidate.

Vertex’s T1D program also includes VX-264, an investigational therapy that encapsulates stem cell-derived islet cells in a protective device to be implanted into the patients’ bodies, according to the company’s website. Because the device is designed to shield the therapeutic cells from the body’s response, VX-264 is being studied without the use of immunosuppressive therapies.
https://www.biospace.com/article/vertex-touts-promising-data-for-stem-cell-based-type-1-diabetes-treatment/

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I mentioned Dexcom’s presentation at EASD in our long format interview earlier this week..
One of the company’s studies, for example, recruited insulin users in the U.K. to test out the Dexcom ONE device, which offers a more simplified interface compared to the company’s flagship G-series sensors. Though both Type 1 and Type 2 patients joined the study, Dexcom specifically singled out its results in the Type 2 population: The group saw their average HbA1c levels drop from a baseline of just over 10% to 8.5% after three months, then down to 8.3% after another three months, according to a company release.

The data marked the first real-world study conducted on the Dexcom ONE CGM, Leach said.

Another study presented at the EASD conference this week verified the use of the G7 sensor in pregnant women with Type 1, Type 2 or gestational diabetes—making Dexcom’s G6 and G7 devices the only commercially available CGMs backed by clinical data for use during pregnancy, the company said.
That group makes up about 10% of all pregnancies, he said, and “whether you’re on insulin therapy or not, just the benefit of having a
Supported by those findings, Dexcom said in the release that it now plans to make the G7 sensor available for use with Tandem’s t:slim X2 insulin pump in the U.S. and “multiple markets across Europe and Asia-Pacific” before the end of 2023.
https://www.fiercebiotech.com/medtech/easd-dexcom-cgms-notch-wins-among-type-2-and-pregnant-users-and-7-year-real-world-data
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Metformin may lengthen the time until insulin initiation, lower fasting glucose and improve neonatal outcomes for pregnant women with gestational diabetes, according to data from a randomized trial.

In findings presented at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes annual meeting and simultaneously published in JAMA, researchers compared glycemic, maternal and neonatal outcomes for women with gestational diabetes randomly assigned up to 2,500 mg metformin daily with those receiving placebo. The metformin group had a lower mean fasting glucose at 32 and 38 weeks of gestation, and the offspring of women receiving metformin had a lower mean birth weight than the offspring of those receiving placebo.

Metformin reduces the likelihood for large for gestational age among offspring of women with gestational diabetes.
Infants from mothers in the metformin group had a lower mean birth weight than offspring of mothers from the placebo group (3,393 g vs. 3,506 g; P = .005). The percentage of infants born large for gestational age was lower in the metformin group vs. placebo (6.5% vs. 14.9%; P = .003). Mean crown-to-heel length was shorter in offspring of mothers from the metformin group compared with placebo (51 cm vs. 51.7 cm; P = .02).

“Caution should continue with metformin and small for gestational age, especially in those where small for gestational age may be more likely, so those with hypertension or nephropathy,” Dunne said during the presentation.
https://www.healio.com/news/endocrinology/20231004/metformin-provides-glycemic-neonatal-benefits-for-women-with-gestational-diabetes

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More voices are calling for more screening for type 1 diabetes. About 85% of people with type have no family history.
Various research programs are going on worldwide to establish the best ways of implementing universal screening, including programs in Germany, the USA, Israel, the UK, and Australia. A new program (Edent1fi) has just been funded that will include multiple new European countries, including the UK, Germany, Poland, Portugal, Italy, and the Czech Republic. “These are all research programs. The next steps before universal screening for type 1 diabetes becomes general policy will require guidelines for monitoring and endorsement of screening and monitoring guidelines by applicable societies,” explains Dr. Sims. This will also be helped by broader access to disease-modifying therapies to impact progression and the need to start insulin injections.
Screening for adults, who can also develop T1D, is less well studied. Although optimal approaches have yet to be elucidated, this population will also likely benefit from identifying early-stage disease and the advantages of education, monitoring, and access to therapy.
https://www.news-medical.net/news/20231003/Universal-screening-A-game-changer-in-early-detection-and-management-of-type-1-diabetes.aspx
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As I mentioned briefly in my last episode, one of the winners of this year’s Nobel prize for medicine has lived with type 1 for almost 60 years. Dr. Drew Weissman and Katalin Karikó won the Nobel for their work on the COVID-19 vaccines received a Nobel Prize of Medicine.
Karikó and Weissman met by chance in the 1990s while photocopying research papers, Karikó told The Associated Press. Weissman was diagnosed at age 5 and I’ll link up a great interview that Mike Hoskins posted – he used to write for DiabetesMine.

http://www.thediabeticscornerbooth.com/2021/02/we-can-thank-this-researcher-with-type.html?m=1&fbclid=IwAR254vGL8G0aU3uUnvfHbJa79WCiFgS8ihMgHMf0V2hK2QYJBLaa9zwMn7U
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Should women be screened for type 2 diabetes at a younger age than men? A recent study published in Diabetes Therapy explores this hypothesis – there’s a lot here and I’ll link it up, but they examine the theory that menstruation can throw off an A1C.
Women with diabetes between 16-60 years of age have an increased mortality risk by about 27% as compared to diabetic men of the same age when both are compared to the general population. Women lose an average of 5.3 years from their lifespan with diabetes as compared to 4.5 years for men. The study comprised two cohorts. The first included over 146,000 individuals using a single HbA1c reading at or below 50 mmol/mol obtained between 2012 and 2019. The distribution was replicated using readings from a second cohort of about 940,000 people, whose samples were analyzed in six laboratories between 2019 and 2021.
The mean HbA1c level in women at any given age corresponded to that observed in men up to ten years earlier. These findings were corroborated with data obtained from the second cohort.
An undermeasurement of approximately 1.6 mmol/mol HbA1c in women may delay their diabetes diagnosis by up to ten years. Ten years in which they weren’t being treated.

https://www.news-medical.net/news/20231004/The-cut-off-for-HbA1c-based-diagnosis-of-diabetes-may-be-too-high-in-women.aspx

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Commercial – Edgepark
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Very recently, the Americans with Diabetes Association released updated CGM guidance for use in schools. The link to the new guidance is below.
This came about after discussions with stakeholders, including myself and Attorney Roswig. Be clear, this was revised because of the discussions and “rallying” of families impacted, where in some cases schools were pointing to certain flaws in the language in the prior guidance.
While this new guidance may address your CGM issue with your particular school, the new guidance, in our opinion, still needs work. Please know that this work will continue.
If you have any more specific questions, please contact me and I will attempt to address the same. Thank you for your patience, thus far, and anticipated trust and patience going forward. https://diabetes.org/sites/default/files/2023-09/cgm-final-9-22-23.pdf?fbclid=IwAR1t4cpPUSmDoitWiH2hSgNnXWdeYQjPW4rlewjWkWHiOYWc65HX8ub74Yo
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have to show everyone and show myself that this doesn’t change anything,” said Lauren Dahlin about her diagnosis with type 1 diabetes (T1D) at 26 years old in 2017. Today, she’s a true athlete who has competed in nine Ironman races — consisting of a 2.4-mile swim, a 112-mile bike ride, and a 26.2-mile run. Completed within about 14 hours!

This past summer, Dahlin competed in the annual Ironman in Lake Placid, NY. The event came with a lot of pressure because placing within the top 24 racers meant qualifying for the biggest Ironman event of all: the World Championship in Kona, HI.

She did it. Dahlin placed 9th amongst about 600 other female competitors — becoming one of the first women with T1D to qualify for the Ironman in Kona, HI. Happening next weekend Oct 14th

Here’s a closer look at Dahlin’s journey from diagnosis to rockstar competitive athlete.

Diagnosed just days before a potential DKA coma
“I couldn’t even walk half a flight of stairs without getting extremely winded because I was so far gone,” explains Dahlin of her pre-diagnosis symptoms. “The clinic gave me an inhaler for asthma and sent me home!”

Dahlin saw six different providers before someone finally gave her the appropriate diagnosis. They even performed a full-blood panel workup and didn’t diagnose her T1D. Eventually, Dahlin went to the emergency room in Boston, where she lived, and the staff told her she was experiencing diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). She then spent ten days in the intensive care unit learning about her new life living with T1D.

“I was bummed that the doctors hadn’t caught my diagnosis earlier because there were a lot of clinical trials happening in Boston that I could have been a part of.”

Regardless, Dahlin didn’t want to slow down — within one month of her diagnosis, she signed up for her first half-marathon.
https://t1dexchange.org/ironman-world-championship-type-1-diabetes/
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That’s In the News for this week.. if you like it, please share it! Thanks for joining me! See you back here soon.

 

[podcast src=”https://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/28214234/height/90/theme/custom/thumbnail/yes/direction/forward/render-playlist/no/custom-color/3e9ccc/” width=”100%” scrolling=”no” class=”podcast-class” frameborder=”0″ placement=”top” primary_content_url=”http://traffic.libsyn.com/diabetesconnections/Ep_595_Final_Dexcom_EASD_Leach_V2.mp3″ libsyn_item_id=”28214234″ height=”90″ theme=”custom” custom_color=”3e9ccc” player_use_thumbnail=”use_thumbnail” use_download_link=”use_download_link” download_link_text=”Download the episode” /]Dexcom’s Chief Operating Officer Jake Leach talks to me about G6, G7, trends in CGM, what the company has its eye on next and answers a lot of your questions.

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

 

Find out more about Moms’ Night Out 

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Take Control with Afrezza 

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Edgepark Medical Supplies

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

Instagram

Twitter

Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

 

 

[podcast src=”https://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/28171529/height/90/theme/custom/thumbnail/yes/direction/forward/render-playlist/no/custom-color/3e9ccc/” width=”100%” scrolling=”no” class=”podcast-class” frameborder=”0″ placement=”top” primary_content_url=”http://traffic.libsyn.com/diabetesconnections/Ep_594_Final_Bonus_Rob_Howe.mp3″ libsyn_item_id=”28171529″ height=”90″ theme=”custom” custom_color=”3e9ccc” player_use_thumbnail=”use_thumbnail” use_download_link=”use_download_link” download_link_text=”Download the episode” /]Bonus episode! Rob Howe is the host of Diabetics Doing Things. He’s also one of the speakers at my Mom’s Night out event coming up in just over two weeks Outside of Dallas, in Frisco Texas.
He’s been going a lot of cool stuff and we were just catching up.. and I thought it would be fun to record a conversation about everything the two of us are working on. So here’s that chat, very little editing and no commercials.
Our regular episodes of course air on Tuesdays – next week’s will be late in the day or maybe Wednesday morning. I’m talking to Dexcom at EASD European Assoc for the Study of Diabetes on Tuesday, so we’ll turn it around as quickly as possible.
Ok, as always, This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

 

Find out more about Moms’ Night Out 

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Take Control with Afrezza 

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Edgepark Medical Supplies

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

Instagram

Twitter

Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

 

 

[podcast src=”https://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/28138100/height/90/theme/custom/thumbnail/yes/direction/forward/render-playlist/no/custom-color/3e9ccc/” width=”100%” scrolling=”no” class=”podcast-class” frameborder=”0″ placement=”top” primary_content_url=”http://traffic.libsyn.com/diabetesconnections/Ep_593_Final_The_Diabetes_Link_College_Panel.mp3″ libsyn_item_id=”28138100″ height=”90″ theme=”custom” custom_color=”3e9ccc” player_use_thumbnail=”use_thumbnail” use_download_link=”use_download_link” download_link_text=”Download the episode” /]Off to college, just for caregivers! Stacey took part in a webinar panel hosted by The Diabetes Link to talk about advice and experience all around sending young adults with type 1 diabetes away to school.

She’s joined by Anna Sabino, CDCES of Finding Smiles Coaching. The panel is hosted by Diane Rose, director of programs for The Diabetes Link.

A transcript is below

Find out more about Moms’ Night Out 

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Take Control with Afrezza 

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Edgepark Medical Supplies

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

Instagram

Twitter

Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

Diane Rose  0:00

Getting this just for those of you that are here. And we’ll get started chatting, and I’ll keep an eye on a few more others drop it. But I don’t want to run out of time, because we will share this recording with everyone who’s not here. So let’s kick it off. For those of you that are joining us. You’re here for some of you, because you did it, you made it, you dropped off your kiddo just a little bit ago, some of you are anxiously awaiting that time coming up. And this particular zoom, and this particular event and our off to college series is just for you just for the parent, just for the caregiver. Just from your perspective. Obviously, the majority of the work that we do here at the diabetes link is focused on your young adult and their experience and what they’re going through and what support do they need. But tonight, we’re going to talk a little bit about what it’s like from your perspective, because we recognize that supporting them, and helping them thrive also means helping you help them. So that’s what we’re here to chat about what that is some excellent people to talk to both Stacey and Anna, let them introduce themselves in just a second. Just to orient anybody, if you’re new to us, if you you know, clicked on this link, if somebody sent it to you, the diabetes Link was formerly known as the college diabetes network. We have rebranded and expanded our mission in the last year to serve all young adults that have all types of diabetes. But obviously, with this program and our legacy programs, and like our original organization, heart and soul is really focused around that like college experience, which all of you guys can relate to. My only other comment like housekeeping is that the chat is open. So feel free to drop questions in there as they pop up. And as they come to you, and we’ll get to them at the end. We’re not going to we’re going to try to kind of roll through some of our talking points and things that we’ve questions that I’ve prepared for Stacey and Anna, but we will come back and look to your questions that handle kind of scroll through them. So if you think of something, go ahead and go ahead and drop it in the chat and we’ll come back to you. Great, love it. Without further ado, do you guys want to take a minute just to introduce yourselves your connection to diabetes, this caregiver experience? Stacey, why don’t you kick it off? Sure.

 

Stacey Simms  2:15

Hi, everybody. I’m Stacey Simms. I am the host of Diabetes Connections, a podcast for about people with type one. And I’m also the author of the world’s worst diabetes mom book series. My son was diagnosed right before he turned two with type one, he is soon to be 19. He is a college freshman. So we just went through the whole process and the drop off in August. I am also the organizer of moms night out which is new event for moms of kids with diabetes, any type of diabetes. We’re gonna talk more about that at the end. But I have a promo code for everybody. And you can save half. So we’ll talk about that later on. But I’m really excited to share our experiences. I call myself the world’s worst diabetes mom, because I do love we’ll get into it. But I don’t think there’s any sense of chasing perfection with diabetes. I’m all about safe and happy. Which makes me weird and worst in some people’s eyes.

 

Diane Rose  3:10

Not at all. And that’s part of why we’re here is that there are experiences unique to everybody. And there is no one right or wrong way. But there are some best practices and like things we can do to help make it easier for everybody. On that note, Anna, do you wanna introduce yourself speaking of there’s no right or wrong way but helping parents figure it the heck out?

 

Anna Floreen Sabino  3:31

No, my name is Anna supino. And I don’t know where to start. I’ve been living with type one for 34 and a half years. Definitely no right or wrong way. I feel like every day is a different day different roller coaster ride. I am a parent my kids are likely screaming above my head now writing bedtime they are three and a half and six. Knock on wood no type one there yet. Hopefully never. I actually am a former employee of the diabetes link used to run a lot of the young adult programs there. But I have since then open to my own private practice serving youth families, parents, young adults, all living with type one virtually, I live in the Boston area. And working with parents and families and helping them navigate the whole kind of life evolution with T1D on the side is really my life’s passion. So excited to be here. Excited to answer questions. And yeah,

 

Diane Rose  4:39

thank you both for just for our audience. We are super lucky to have both of these incredible women with us to share some insights from all of their lived experiences. So I’m really appreciative. We’re gonna jump right in to questions and a little bit of like couple of the talking points and areas we want to chat about. Um, so from, from our perspective, from the parents perspective, let’s talk about preparation. Being prepared, feeling prepared getting prepared for this process. And I would say that this probably this question specifically speaks to those parents that are just starting their college journey. And their kids are maybe starting the journey, a lot of you responded in the chat that you’re just getting ready or you’re dropping off next fall your kids entering their senior year, very likely, you’re overwhelmed by the countdown of all the things to do college tours, applications, the FAFSA acceptances, packing everything, and then you add in the layer of diabetes prep. And then also, depending on your family dynamics, that depending on your young adults diagnosis date, you’ve probably been taking care of a lot of their diabetes management over the years. And again, that can be different for everyone, right? But that look, that could look like if we were all on camera, we could raise our hands, but I can raise my hands for all of these ordering their supplies, dealing with insurance, middle of the night lows, car counts, school communication, doctor appointments, buying all the low supplies, on and on. And then now your young adult, you know, is 18. And they’re getting ready to be away from you. And they have to take all of this on themselves. And how do you help them get there? How do you prepare for it? So reflecting on like this phase specifically for you, Stacey, can you share about what did you and your family do to prepare for your son’s independence and managing has diabetes? add on to that, what do you wish you would have done differently? Hmm.

 

Stacey Simms  6:37

So what we did was my son was dying was very young, as I said, and I think this really varies if your child is diagnosed older. You know, certainly if your child is diagnosed in the year before college begins, it’s a whole different ball of wax. But we encouraged independence from a very young age. And we reinforced that as my son grew up, and we let him do a lot. That made me very nervous, but that I knew would help us all in the long run. And the whole goal was that we wanted him to be completely independently managed by his senior year of high school, which in my mind meant I would only help if needed, we did the insurance stuff for him in ordering of supplies. And I’m gonna talk about that a little bit more in a minute, because we did change that before he went to college. But for everything else, it was, you know, changing infusion sets, filling insulin cartridges being responsible for everything that was on him. And we were able to do that because we let him go and we let him make a lot of mistakes. And we’d let them manage diabetes in a way that was not the way I would have managed I was just really hard. Especially in middle school when I don’t know I think they lose their brains, but you have to be really patient. So for us, it started with playtime at other kids homes when he was in kindergarten right down the street for two to three hours sleepovers at age seven or eight which is when I let his older sister start doing sleepovers, sleepaway camp diabetes camp to begin with. Then, regular sleepaway camp I sent him to non diabetes camp. And then he did a month abroad is his summer before his junior year of high school. So when he was 16, he went to Israel for a month, which was really hard on me, but he loved and was a real dividing point for us. Gradually, I started turning off Dexcom alerts and alarms. So his senior year of high school, I had no high alert by the end of it, I had no LOW Alert. And during the summer, he was away at the same camp working as a lifeguard, not a diabetes camp. No alarms, no follow. No more. Everyone does this differently. I don’t think everyone has to do that. I think it depends on your child and your relationship to diabetes. But that’s how we did it. And I will also say in terms of insurance companies and ordering supplies, one of the things we did that has been very helpful is we we and you have to do this together. I mean, what a pain in the SSL is, but you have to we had to do this together, you sit down. And every time I had to order something new, I would change the account so that his phone number was on it. But my email was on it. And my son is 18 We have all the legal forms, right, blah, blah, blah. But these companies don’t seem to care about that. They just want to contact so his his phone number because they get the texts, my email. The trick, though, is you have to remember you’ve done that, because he recently texted me like what’s the clarity login? And I was like, I don’t remember what we did. And it took us 20 minutes to figure it out. So long answer to your question. I’m sure more to come. But the answer is we did independence very gradually with a specific goal. And we let go of the reins in a way that made me nervous did not have the outcomes I would have loved but gave us outcomes that our endocrinologist said we’re safe enough.

 

Diane Rose  9:54

Think that’s super real and really appreciate that real perspective. I’m living a little bit of that, just in like moving up to high school experience in our house here with my young adult with type one, it’s a different experience. They’re very hands off, she’s running the show. And it’s a little different, but we’re figuring it out. And it’s a great, I just keep reminding myself, like, it’s going to help her and it’s going to be great as we move, you know, because these four years are gonna go quickly. Anna, from your perspective, either your lived perspective, or what you’ve seen over the years, like working with and talking to parents recommendations, suggestions, what like, what is parenting to independence to you? Because that’s, you’ve introduced that phrase to me, I’m going to give you credit phrase, how do you suggest that parents begin to prepare to let their children take over like Stacey did? Do you have any recommendations?

 

Anna Floreen Sabino  10:45

Um, I mean, Stacy says it’s so well, I, you know, there, I’ve gone to so many different conferences on this idea of transition. And most, you know, clinical teams will say, you know, it has to begin at age 11, or 12, you know, with whatever type of chronic illness or not, you have in your backpack, and whatever that looks like to you, is totally fine. I think the key as you gradually move towards independence is making sure that you’re talking about it, and making sure that you’re having open communication, that you’re constantly on the same page, that you’re setting sort of appropriate boundaries that are shared, like goal setting, and I’m throwing out a lot of different terms there. I’m a social worker and diabetes educator by training. So I do a lot of work with parents on setting shared goals and doing shared decision making and, and really putting on your, you know, active listening ears. You know, teenagers especially need a lot of validation, they need a lot of being told that they’re doing well. And I think sometimes we can forget, you know, everything that they have going on, I was just actually at my CrossFit gym this morning, I was talking to the coach after and she was like, Ellie is so stressed like fall senior year, trying to do early decision still doing keep team captain of soccer, trying to do like yearbook, like doing all the things. And it’s a lot, it’s constantly a lot plus on top of it trying to manage a chronic illness. So even if you are just listening to them vent and complain, just say, I understand that’s a lot. How can I help, like, let’s get through this together and make sure that you guys are on the same team, like moving forward for the next you know, like 350 days till it’s move in day. Because they they need you now and being on that same like cheerleader team, even though they’re the ones that are ya gonna bolus whether they remember or not, or Yeah, gonna maybe not cover for every single gram of carbohydrate. I still do that I’m 34 years in and I don’t cover for every gram of carbohydrate. So remember who they are as like kiddos and teens first, and fill in the diabetes conversations as you as you move forward. Lots of check ins lots of praise, how can I help treat them like the team captain of their diabetes? Because they are.

 

Diane Rose  13:23

I love that team captain and like support active listening lots of like, Great nugget, races, for sure.

 

Anna Floreen Sabino  13:32

And it’s a lot easier said than done. I was gonna say, Oh, that’s so hard to tell us to use all these like cool terms. And then when it gets to the moment, I mean, I listen to the parenting podcast, and I’m like, Okay, I’m not gonna say that when my kids like yelling at me in a tantrum and why? So I think it takes it takes a lot of self compassion. It takes a lot of practice. I tell parents practice in the car with your kiddo. Ask them, you know, how can I help? You know, it sounds it sounds like you’ve had a really rough day. I’m here when you want to talk. And sometimes the kids don’t want you to say anything. They just want you to be in the room. That’s all they want. And that presence is presence enough for 16 1718 year old, but

 

Diane Rose  14:17

also works here with Yes, I think that’s great advice. And I think you’re actually giving us a very natural segue into my next question.

 

Anna Floreen Sabino  14:25

No good.

 

Diane Rose  14:28

Preparation can mean some of the tactical stuff Stacy like you talked about of, you know, bolusing and site changes and filling you know, cartridges and, and Anna to your point. A lot of preparation is communication. And I think that’s another super important topic. It’s one of the ones that comes up obviously in our Facebook group and like in all the areas that we all work and overlap a lot is communication and boundaries. Do especially as your kids going to school and preparing for that time. Do you use Dexcom? Follow yes or no? When do you check in with your young adult of around their diabetes or not at school? What do you do if they don’t respond to you the way you want them to or the way you hope they do? Like they’re not giving you the information that you think you want, or need? Who else needs to know about their diabetes? Their roommates are the professors and RA. You know, ultimately, what we really believe, I think all of us on this call, and specifically the diabetes link, but all of those decisions, all those questions, I just asked her ultimately up to your young adult to lead. But having the conversations in advance, setting expectations in advance and help ease the stress and the frustration on both sides. I’m going to drop in the chat while Stacey and Anna are kind of giving us their lens on communication and boundaries, a link to one of our resources, a sample family communication agreement. But Stacey, if you want to kick it off, what what strategies work for you what like, what kind of communication Do you have around diabetes are so far since he’s been off at school? Is that working? Like do you feel like it’s working for him and working for you?

 

Stacey Simms  16:10

Yeah, sure, I can answer all the questions that you posed there. Oh, no. No, because they really are good. And I would say that communication for us, it’s not something that you can kind of pull out of your pocket when your kid is a senior in high school, right? This is a parenting situation, not the diabetes parenting situation. So chances are good, you’ve been talking to your kids about stuff ranging from doing laundry, to emptying the dishwasher, to changing their cartridge, right, since they were very young, depending on when they were diagnosed with diabetes. And this is just another parenting conversation. I have a conversation with my son at the beginning of every school year, with, you know, what do you want to do with diabetes this year, and we started it when he was in first grade. So first grader, of course, has a lot of ideas and eighth grader grunts at you and rolls his eyes, but you still have the conversation. And so this was a really natural way for us to kind of segue into college with well, how do you see this going? What do you want us to do? Um, it was funny, because when my daughter went to college, she doesn’t have type 1 diabetes. We didn’t talk about how often we were going to communicate. And about four days in every Facebook group I was in was like, I’ve talked to my child 600 times. I was like, I haven’t even texted yet. So I texted her, and I was like, how do you want to do this? And she was like, you know, I’ll call you when I need you. So we decided one, you know, every Sunday, we would FaceTime and then it was up to her. When she would text with Benny. I told him that for the first two weeks, I want them to text every day. And he laughed at me, we actually did a podcast episode on him. And you can hear me mention that you can hear him laugh at me. But we did that. And it was just very helpful. But I have a lot of experience with my kids being away from home. So he’s always been away for the summer for at least two weeks, four weeks, six weeks, 10 weeks once. So I’m very used to that I think it takes it was a good thing for me to get used to gradually. So I got used to less communication. We also knew when we hit decided this, I don’t know probably sophomore year of high school, we talked about it that we our plan was not to follow with Dexcom when he was in college, and we made the decision for a lot of reasons. I don’t begrudge anybody using that. I think it’s a wonderful tool. But I would just caution you that it is a tool you are not it’s tool, which sounds a little harsh, but just the way you use that has to be a way that enhances your life, helps your child Thrive helps you thrive and doesn’t completely stress you out. So we’ve always had a plan for how we use Dexcom. I don’t want to get into it too much here I’ve talked about in the past before written stuff on it. But you have to have the conversation with your kid, whether they’re 17 or seven. How are you using it? What’s the plan when the alarm goes off? Who are you going to call? You know, my son wanted me to follow when he would it was in Israel, which I thought was a terrible idea. What the hell am I going to do here? But we talked about it and we worked out a plan. We decided in college, that was not going to happen. But I was very reassured because my son has always been very upfront and open about his diabetes. And I knew when he talked with this as well, that he would talk to his roommate about it. He was talking to his ra about it, his professors would know his friends would know he’s extremely open. So I felt like he’s he’s shared his Dexcom data with friends in the past, which is I think kind of funny, but works for him. I wasn’t too concerned about it. I also like to mention we went seven years with no Dexcom with no CGM because he was diagnosed ages two to nine. You know, it was back in the day. I know it seems crazy, but Dexcom share wasn’t around till what 2015 2016 It’s new. And we had those seven years to kind of learn what it was like without one and so I’m, I hope he wears it forever. He’s a big CGM kid. He is like waiting nonstop. He’s never without it. He loves it. He works with his system. He has a Tandem so he’s he’s all over it. But I think it gave us peace of mind that he would be fine without it. So that’s a lot I tried to quickly answer a lot. those questions I think I hit a lot of them. But you gotta just gotta keep talking.

 

Diane Rose  20:03

Yeah. Communication and boundaries and strategy. I love that like, with, you know, because it is a challenge going off sending any kid off to college and for you to compare for us like, oh, when we did this with my daughter, but this with any and that can happen with any kids in your family. Yeah, it specifically around diabetes, I think having some agreements and some boundaries around when you’re checking in on him as a human as a person and when you’re also checking in on diabetes is super important. And what about your thoughts?

 

Anna Floreen Sabino  20:29

I was just gonna add to I mean, I think the net one of the one of the number one reasons parents will reach out to me is because of their own stress, oftentimes that the CGM can cause and I also am probably not the best person to answer this because for the first 13 years, my regimen was two shots a day. And we didn’t know any information in between. I went to college actually the same college STC. Big plug for the Syracuse orange. But we you know, I lived in a dorm room and I had I had no CGM. I know that I didn’t have a cell phone until my sophomore year of college. That’s how old I am, I guess. But I used to call my mom after nine because it was free on Verizon. And like, talk about my day. And all she could ask was what are my numbers. And I know that’s not what this is about. But it’s about feeling feeling confident and comfortable with what you’re okay with. And you have to communicate what that means to you and really figure out where you can access that trust with like within you. And I would practice building up that trust and resilience like now, whether it’s going to like having your kid go to a football game or going away on an overnight weekend, you know, not ever I also was a diabetes camp girl and I was gone for eight weeks. And I will say I think that prepared me more than anything to be in college by myself. But I know that’s also not the norm for every high school senior. And if you can practice building up this sense of trust, if you haven’t already, by just turning turning the CGM off, even if it’s for a night, or even if it’s for six or seven or eight hours, to just practice, practice being away from your kid. I mean, we do this for families with summer camp where we there is no access to CGI for parents. And it takes a lot when you get used to the reliability of the information. It’s like a huge letdown. But it’s honestly an amazing break for everyone. And it helps ease that transition. That being said, I work with a lot of college students where they want their parents to follow them. They are used to it that is a safe space for them. There is no right or wrong answer when it comes to communication, they come up with like a secret emoji or whatnot. So it really just depends on like, what works for you and your family. I always encourage and this activity I do with like, all of my clients is really just like write down, you know what’s going well, you know, what’s working right now at home. Because if we don’t focus on what is working, we’re gonna like set ourselves up for a massive amount of overwhelm when it comes to what we want, like this sort of new life to look like, what’s going well right now and what’s working and your endo should do that too. Like don’t only focus on like the yellow parts of the CGM clarity graph, like let’s look at the best day and focus on what happened. Right. But if we’re focusing on what’s going well, we can ultimately have that goal be to just transition a lot of that to just a new environment. You know, what works well at home should also work well at school should also work well at college should also work well on vacation for the most part. So I’ll stop talking. But I think it’s all about just thinking about like, even if it’s like writing down. Okay, this is working well for me, and what might be working well for you might be different than what is currently working well for your son or daughter. And then you kind of have to come together. The last thing I’ll say on that is if you have like a two parent household, make sure the other parent is on board too. Because I know even like I was away last weekend and like the daycare like called my husband instead of me and they’re like we tried to reach you and I was like I’m out of town. You know, make sure the loop that you know the triangle was completely closed, whether it’s a text thread or whether it’s through the nurse or whether it’s through you know that you’re communicating if there’s a shift or a change in terms of how so it’s a communication which is very challenging for already, but if you practice now I promise it will feel that much lighter mentally come August.

 

Diane Rose  25:08

Yep. I mean that practice, practice, communicate. I will say it’s interest for me as like a parent of a younger teenager with type en. Who we’ve only known CGM, right like she was diagnosed and within 30 days was put on a CGM. Absolutely, and I think very typical of parents of like, more recently diagnosed young adults, just completely overwhelmed with that data one and two with the fact that like, I was failing as a parent, because we weren’t keeping it within, you know, certain range or certain expectations. And reminder, that is, you know, that we, as parents had to give ourselves grace, like, I had to figure out time to figure out how to navigate that information and to figure out like, what’s best for my kid and what’s best for us, and that our kids is they take over that control, and they start doing it themselves, they have to wrestle with that as well. Like, if they’re going off to college, and you have a method of what works for you is like mom, or dad or the parent, and what you think is good for them. They’re trying to figure all that out on their own Oh, and like, make new friends and go to school, and you know, all new everything. So you have to, we have to apply that same grace that we have to learn. And that’s a hard one for me to remember. But working on it, hopefully say by practicing the communicating by college, we’ll get there. Um, oh, I think it’s important. Another thing that comes up a lot in the in the Facebook group and like amongst parent conversations, and that, you know, for me going back to the idea of worry, and like, just Worry, worry, worry. I feel like the biggest one when your kid is away from home is what if they don’t wake up to their low alarm at night? What do you do if you’re used to being that backup? And related to that, like other questions that I imagine we have heard run through every parent’s head? What happens in that emergency situation? What is the number, you know, what is an emergency situation? What does that look like to you versus to your kid? Because you’re not there with them? You’re not in the moment. You know, and establishing that like, what what can I do a home? Or how do I you and yours that I didn’t use that fear of something happening and not being able to like step in and help? Well,

 

Stacey Simms  27:23

I want to preface Yeah, let me preface what we’re about when Anna’s the more of a medical professional. So I will preface what I’m about to say with I wish that a panel of endocrinologists would study this, and talk to parents about the reality of overnight lows. Because this is the number one thing right? Everybody fears this and we hear dead in bed, which was coined a million years ago, with older insolence that nobody uses anymore. Can terrible things happen? Yes. But I would urge everybody on the call, and everybody who’s listening to have this conversation privately with your endocrinologist, not something I would talk about in front of your kid. Ask them about the reality. Ask them about their practice, and they will more than likely tell you the biggest thing that they worry about is alcohol, and self harm. So I don’t want to go too much into detail. I am not a medical professional. I don’t have studies in front of me. I’m not going to tell anyone their fears are unfounded. But I would say if you’re getting your information from Facebook about the chances of something terrible happening to your child, bring that information to your endocrinologist. And I brought it to mind who sees 1000s and 1000s of people and I have not thought about it again. Having said that, how do you do overnights and worry about Lowe’s, and right because we want to treat Lowe’s having said that we don’t want them sleeping through it. The anecdotal evidence that I will say of being in the community for almost 17 years is if you wake your kid up for Lowe’s, you treat them for every Lowe’s, they’re not going to wake up for their loads because they know you’re coming in even subconsciously. Most kids, when they are away from home, figure this part out. Some kids want more reassurance. They want that bed shaker to wake them up, they want the sugar pixel to yell at them or whatever the heck it’s called, I don’t have any of that stuff. So I don’t know. But they want that great, wonderful. Use whatever it takes to make them comfortable. Remember, this is about your kid. It’s not about you. So whatever method works for them is great. I would urge you, if you’re freaking out about this and they’re leaving for college soon, do it when you’re there at home, stop, stop. You’re there in the next room, unless your child has an underlying medical condition or other things right. This is another talk to your endo thing. But if they’re, you know, getting a little low and you’re about to run in and treat maybe you don’t and see what happens. I mean, Anna, if you want to chime in I mean, I probably sound like a horrible person but

 

Anna Floreen Sabino  29:53

I cringe at this topic because as somebody who was at one point like the admin of the like Facebook group, it’s like the number one. And we hear you know, I’ve moderated all these panels too. And the number one, you hear parents like knocking on campus security and all that stuff. And, and I agree, Stacy, it’s only going to rile up your own anxiety and trigger this sense of even more fear in you. Because this is a youth thing. This is a parent thing. The kids like whatever, I’m gonna go to school the next day, like they could care less as they should. Their brain, as we all know, like their prefrontal cortex ain’t there. It’s not there until age 25 states, a US Senate teenage brain, forget it, nothing, nothing there quite yet a lot of gray matter has not formed. And that being said, I think we have to remember to that. As much as there are so many times where we think they might be low, we have to learn to trust the systems. So many of us now are using systems that are preventing loads from happening. If you are having an overnight low, that is flat, and there’s not a lot of insulin on board. Now, this is the hard part when you don’t have no access to seeing every single, you know, move or every single bolus. For the most part, if you’re just like, 60 overnight and writing it out, like, that’s okay, our bodies are used to waking up at 60 and flat. If it were me, I wouldn’t treat it. So I think, again, it’s practicing and having those conversations, what does a low feel like to you, I also would not discourage people to kind of try out, you know, substances to like, just see what they feel like, look and see what the CGM is doing. It’s not going to be the same. Every single night. I will also say that, as an educator, I think there is a lot of emphasis on alcohol makes you low. And yes, it can. But just because you have one beer or two drinks, like over the course of four or five hours, and there’s a couple of slices of pizza in there, doesn’t mean you’re going to have a blood sugar of 50 later on. So I just want to emphasize that because I think a lot of people think oh my gosh, I have to set this to basal and I have to put on activity mode. And I have to, you know, make sure I do x, y and z if I have like a few sips. We’re talking about massive binge drinking at the end of the night that is going to suspend that release of glucagon from the liver. Every single person is different. Every single night is different. There’s 1000 different variables. But I think a lot of I’ve seen a lot of conversation out there where it’s like, you know, alcohol causes low blood sugar, and I don’t it’s it’s gray. It’s just kind of like high blood sugar causes ketones. Are you all with you know, it’s a very gray area. So yes, it can be scary. Alcohol is something that is one more variable that can have a delay on low. And we also have tools in our systems like the Omnipod five and Medtronic and the T slim with control IQ that are working their butts off to suspend that insulin if it detects it. So we have to remember that that it’s going to do everything it can to prevent that low from happening. Yeah,

 

Stacey Simms  33:34

if I could just add to and you asked this day, and we didn’t answer it, um, in terms of talking to roommates, and you know how to handle emergencies. This is something that I talked to my son about, but I have to tell you, the probably the proudest diabetes parenting moment I ever had came when he told me and we were just having a conversation about something else. He said every time he has a roommate situation, this was in ninth grade, he told me this like when they go on school trips, they he was on the wrestling team at the time. So they were traveling. And every time he’s got new roommates, he would sit them down and show them the back see me nasal spray, and his the G Bo Capo pen. You know, I love saying these things because we used to only have the red box, which nobody explained ever because no one was going to use that. But these are simple tools that even doofus ninth graders could use. So he would show them. And he would say if I’m ever slurring my words, I’m not making sense. I’m, you know, get the coach, but do this. And he would talk to them about it. And I was like, Wow, that’s great. It’s like, Oh, I do this every time I’m with new people. It’s like what you know, so that was amazing to me. So when he went to college, I said, Well, we talked about it. What are you going to do with your Romaine? I’m going to tell him. I said, Well, what if your mate isn’t comfortable doing that? Right? That’s a lot of responsibility. And he he was stunned. He was like, I have never encountered someone who wasn’t willing to help me. And he said, and that’s what it is if that person is not willing to help me because I would switch roommates. He said I can’t even imagine because you’re just shoving nasal spray at my nose. You’re not doing CPR? And I was like, Okay, well, that and that was his take on it. I don’t know what the policy of the schools would be. But I would have backed him on that if the roommate said he wasn’t willing to, you know, to do a nasal it’s, it’s an interesting question that luckily, we didn’t have to write. But work through

 

Diane Rose  35:17

I mean, I love I just from like, as an as you say, seeing like the Facebook group, and like hearing lots of conversations, a lot of times, I feel like, that’s a lot of apparent question like, Who do I go to? And I feel like, one to speak to, like, how do you handle you know, lows or any emergencies? To have that reassurance to like, take care of our own fear, is to figure out those steps to figure out who you can talk to what do you call Campus Security? Do you call housing? What are your options at a distance if it truly really is an emergency? So that that, like, at least for me, preparation, preparation, preparation, like I want to know what all my options are? That that is something we can do as a parent or caregiver from a distance. You know, know those options, but I feel like and, Anna, correct me, but the two caveats with that are remembering that your kids roommate, even their RA, those are someone else’s kids to both their children. And like, yes, there is a protocol within the organization within your school within their housing, like you do need to follow that protocol. And they are someone else’s kid who’s the roommate is figuring out their life. And like all of their new changes as well. That’s super important to like, respect and understand that, you know, you can’t expect a kid it’s not fair or appropriate, really to expect a roommate to be your like, emergency response for all the things and like you said, Stacy, but he’s had a great experience. And absolutely for anyone that’s close to you, or that you have relationships with. For sure. But that might be different people. It might be a roommate, there might be somebody in the room, three doors down the hall.

 

Stacey Simms  36:59

Yeah, it’s an interesting question. I see what you’re saying. I totally see what you’re saying. And you don’t want to put the burden on people. But at the same time, I think the way my son approaches it, is if I broke my leg, would you leave me lying on the floor? Absolutely. Yeah. You know, I mean, he’s not you know, and it’s it was it’s really interesting question, we could talk about it, I’m sure for its own our, you know, liability and things like that. But yeah, it can’t be the it can’t be legal, the responsibility of that kid. But why would as my son says, like, why would you wanna be friends with somebody who’s not going to help you?

 

Diane Rose  37:27

I think that goes back to ultimately, your kid should lead these conversations. Yeah,

 

Stacey Simms  37:31

I don’t have the roommates phone number, by the way. Great. That was great. I like to for other reasons, are they doing laundry? Are they eating?

 

Anna Floreen Sabino  37:40

Smelly and fun? I think the other piece of advice I would say too, is I think as a parent, we often want to sometimes just like step in and share it all on their behalf. Oh, and, and this and he can do this. It’s like, let them do the talking like this is a practice for them. And they don’t have to the you know, their roommate relationship is going is like a series of first dates for like the whole semester. I remember being a freshman being like, I don’t know you, I’m not going to have dinner with you do you want to pull me in here. And you gradually offload bits and pieces about your life and include diabetes in that. As time goes on, you’re not going to be like, This is what my current current ratio is. And I have to do this, and I can’t eat pizza at all, like in what text message like that would be insane. And I would not want to be friends with anyone. That’s like too much word vomit for a text message. A lot of people ask me, What’s the best way to tell my roommate, I have type one. And I actually would consider a text message. Because it is a big thing to offload onto a random person, you likely you know, some people meet at orientation or you know, our request to be put together. And others are just assigned and you get you know, an email with their phone number and information. And, you know, I don’t know if it would be Hi, my name is Anna and I’ve type 1 diabetes. Nice to meet you. I’m arriving at this day. I’ll bring the microwave like, whoa, rewind. What’s about diabetes? Most of the time, they’ll be like, Okay, thanks for letting me know like so excited to meet you. And I also think it’s an opportunity for you know, if you tell them on the phone, although I don’t even know if people pick up the phone and call these remotes anyway. Or email didn’t happen

 

Stacey Simms  39:29

here. Snap, what

 

Anna Floreen Sabino  39:30

didn’t happen. It was via text messages. Like it allows people to kind of figure out what they want to say and respond on their own time. And don’t be like surprised if they don’t say anything at all about it. It they may just be taking it in or they may just like have all the questions in the world and want to wait till they see you. They don’t want to offend you. A lot of people are so afraid to talk about diabetes because they know that there is a stigma. Oh my gosh, what if I say the wrong thing? What if I have set them. So they may just want to leave it alone. And that’s okay too.

 

Diane Rose  40:05

Yep. I love that. I think it goes back to just the your reminder where you like, kicked in with letting them lead it like that they’re gonna decide when and how to communicate that. And Stacy due to that, like, this is how Benny handled it. And he always handled it. And he always introduced it. Like, that’s how it felt right to him. That’s what worked for him. That’s, you know how he set the tone. But it’s super important to let them leave that communication. And honestly, the this is like tangent on them, I want to move on to one other thing before we get to, hopefully some track questions. It’s also the whole difference of them being minors or being 18. So a lot of things at school, you literally have to let them your note were no longer their point of contact for 504 and accommodations and the disability service office. And same with their roommates and the relationships. And hopefully you’ve been practicing that along the way but emergency situations, you know, lows, how to talk to those roommates, how they set that up, really letting them lead the way and understanding respecting that you do have a young adult. And in the eyes of the college community specifically, they have to call the shots, they have to initiate the communication with the university. And the best thing we can do is support them in initiating that communication with their friends and their community to like you said Anna, like don’t word vomit. I for sure get yelled at by that. But my 15 year old right now. I’m like, Mom, that’s enough. So I’m getting out of the way early. But I think you’re right.

 

Anna Floreen Sabino  41:34

I think the I think we forget they think they’re thinking about it internally a lot more than we think we are, you know, like we’re women. We like to talk we like to analyze, and they’re thinking about it in here. They’re just not sharing it with you. They’re sharing it with their their friends. I had a call the other day with a 13 year old girl. And she’s like, Oh, I don’t tell my parents anything. I’ll tell my friends.

 

Stacey Simms  41:58

But it doesn’t have to tell your parents. What did you tell your parents about your first five weeks at college? What did you tell your parents on the way

 

Anna Floreen Sabino  42:05

home? Like I said it was good. We talked about classes. And we talked about well, and then 911 happened my freshman year? Well, my 911 happened to my third week of classes. So it was honestly it was a very different vibe, my freshman year of school. And in upstate New York, I’d say a quarter you know, the Stasi, about a quarter or roughly a third of our campus is from the New York area. So there’s a lot of solidarity, a lot of solemn lot of vigils were in which it wasn’t a lot of campuses, but it was a different start to what I think was most people’s normal college experience. And we talked a lot about classes, we talked a lot about how are things going. And we also didn’t have the data, my parents had no data, they have no access to any data. They only knew what I was telling them. So they had no option but to trust. And no option but to know that they have done a good job. And that was that was it. I also go to diabetes camp. And they knew that I knew what I was doing because I they knew how much I had appreciated all of what I had learned from a diabetes perspective, but also just like a life perspective on having the built up resilience and self confidence of being a way that could transition from the camp environment to school. So I had this sort of ability for learned self advocacy, which is like, hands down the number one, number one thing that camp taught me, it’s just learning to speak up for yourself, even if it wasn’t your age 10 Hi, I need a band aid. Like that can take a lot of effort if it’s someone brand new. Same with at school, it’s learning to raise your hand when something doesn’t feel right.

 

Diane Rose  43:54

I think that’s the number one I’d say. See, I’ve heard you say that as well. I think last time we chatted but like advocating for themselves and speaking up for themselves is the number one skill set.

 

Stacey Simms  44:02

I have a whole thing on my website right now about that. But you can bet

 

Diane Rose  44:06

I can card super important. And that’s where like as parents we at least I’ll speak for me personally, I won’t speak for all parents that would not be great. But for me, it’s that balance of as you said Anna, like word vomiting or overstepping, or like stepping in and good and good setting it up and modeling advocacy, like when they’re younger and modeling it and saying, Hey, this is how you know like I’m gonna help advocate for you on your behalf with someone or with this teacher in middle school or elementary school or this is how you could talk to your friend and helping them build the tools and modeling it but not just always doing it for them.

 

Anna Floreen Sabino  44:37

I think the other thing that I would say too, and I know that Benny had probably this as well like my parents knew how much I relied on my camp community for my diabetes support. My parents role in my diabetes care was the logistics was the like appointments was the you know Insurance pieces of it. And I would just, I would call my I did get on a pump after my freshman year because I was like, I don’t know, when I give this Lance test, I give it at 11pm. Or like 3pm 3am When I come home like this is too much. So I eventually did get on a pump for my sophomore year, it was game changing. But I still was the one that was like call Medtronic and change the shipping address. This happened once my supplies got sent to camp because I had, and then they had to route it, that just happens. But it’s a lesson learned. And that’s a life adult lesson. So like, I also think it’s okay, like kids are going to make mistakes, like let them learn. Let them build up that sense of resilience. And I forgot what I was going to say there. Well, I

 

Stacey Simms  45:41

think I can jump in on that I

 

Anna Floreen Sabino  45:42

had my diabetes support system in place before I left for college. And I think that’s also important, whether it’s through the link, whether it is through JDRF, or whether it would or whatever it’s through, like have your own tribe, and have your kid have somebody that they can lead to so they feel ever so slightly less alone. Come August

 

Diane Rose  46:03

Yep. Stay say you wanted to add something. And I’m talking about that idea up here. So like, go right ahead, go read having a community

 

Stacey Simms  46:12

go for it. Oh, I was gonna say is so much of what I think comes down to the difficulty with diabetes parenting is that our kids sometimes feel like we don’t trust them. You know, they really feel like by questioning what they’re doing, especially as they get older, that we don’t trust them. We don’t think they understand. We don’t think that we don’t understand the burden, which we don’t, we don’t really get what they’re going through. And so what’s been really helpful for me over the years is to talk to Benny in a way that shows and I messed this up all the time. I mean, whatever. But we try right to say, Look, I know you’re doing a good job, I know you’re doing the best that you can and diabetes just stinks. But I’m I don’t see you doing this, can you show me how you’re doing it? Or, you know, like, Look, your A1C went up, you’ve been told this is true, right? You were totally independently managed for the last three months, and I saw a rise in your A1C and your diamond range went down. I know you’re doing hard work. And I know diabetes is tough. And I don’t say like how can I help Diane, right? Like, that’s a good thing when they’re younger, but I’m not supposed to be helping. So I say to him, to be honest with you. I’m getting worried. But I don’t want you to think that I that you can’t do this. So can you just let me in a little bit and tell me what’s going on? And sometimes they’ll be like, Yeah, I didn’t feel like bolusing for half those meals. And this sucks. And I’m just catching up. And sometimes they’ll say like, I didn’t change my infusion set on time. I’m trying to get better at that. But it’s not working right now for me. Or I think my ratios are really off Mom, it’s not working. Can you take a look? So just teaching like could tell your kids all the time. Like you’d have to say it like this, but telling them that you trust them is huge. Because I think that even though we think like Well, of course I trust you look at all the stuff I let you do. Of course I trust you I think you’re very responsible. They don’t know. They just hear why aren’t you doing it perfectly? Why aren’t you more having more time to arrange Yeah, we need to reinforce to them. We know this is really really hard like that might have happened because you have type 1 diabetes. Yeah, I just saw

 

Anna Floreen Sabino  48:11

I just saw a note from Carrie and they’re like I feel that I feel like I you know my blood sugar was 400 A lot of the time at school and going back to your going back to your comment Diane about how like, you just want to trust them and let them let them take a lead and there are so many reasons why a blood sugar can be high that sometimes isn’t related to their lack of effort. Like the site ripped out or the battery died or like you know, you’re you’re mentioning that like mom I’m trying well maybe she was trying to make it to class on time and the site ripped out on the door of her dorm or you know we there are so many reasons why our blood sugar’s do the way they do adrenaline hormones growth spurts, bad insulin, you know, the list goes on. And I think you hit the nail on the head, Stacy, like we have to replace every negative thought with two positive ones. Because aren’t we forget that our kids, they’re just as stressed if not more than we are. They’re the ones living it and they don’t want to see a 300 they may not say that they may not be like oh, you know I’m really stressed my blood sugar’s 300. I hope I don’t go blind someday like we are 20 year olds will never think if this if this then that. But they’re still stressed in that moment. So how can I know we’ve valid we have to validate it. I know you’re doing a great job. I know this must be so hard for you. How can I help? Yep, let’s like the power of the word. Let’s, let’s figure out a way to make this work. Because you’re on a team together. I know it’s so incredibly hard to see those like three hundreds all the time. And now it’s a matter of if it’s a pattern, let’s talk about it. If it’s one or two times a week, it’s college.

 

Diane Rose  50:08

Yep. That’s I think that’s really great advice. And to Carrie’s comment, like, Carrie, you said, you have the you have experience, you’ve had type one for 50 years. So you have a lot that you know about your own experience. And of course, like your worries, and that your daughter is just a month in. And so that that’s like almost a whole different ballgame of like, the body is literally trying to figure out stabilizing with all of this new stuff. You know, the interventions and things you’re trying to trial and error and figure out what works for her and following. And those recommendations and what do you think and then all the new stuff was school. The only thing I would add that I feel like sometimes the tack that I try, and I’ve heard others and advice that I’ve received is helped me understand, like, I’m just checking in, I’m just checking in helped me understand what’s going on. Like, this is for me, I’m I just need a little more information. Like it’s not that you’re not, but help me understand what’s happening. And then yeah, and then if it’s in the moment, like Okay, that seems like a really stressful moment. And then maybe, you know, like you said, and if it’s a pattern, Hey, I’ve noticed this kind of happening for a while. Have you noticed that happening for a while? Like, yeah, that’s, that’s got to be really frustrating for you like it’s worrying me a little bit, what do you think we might need to change or you might need to do like having that conversation about it.

 

Stacey Simms  51:21

One of the pieces of advice that used to float around more in the community that might help these these newer diagnoses. I’m not quite sure if this will work. But there used to be this thing where you wouldn’t talk about diabetes except an appointment. Right? You’d be like, Okay, on Sunday, we’re putting the time aside. Yeah, we’re doing diabetes talk at 3pm on Sunday, and then you spend 20 minutes hashing it out, like, you know, everybody has to agree to do it. If the kid if you’re 18, or 19 year old does not into this, it will work, obviously, but rather than texting all week, or trying to work in it, okay, I’m gonna ask them how they are, how’s the weather? how was class? And then I’m gonna ask them how their blood sugar is right? Like, just don’t try to work it into a regular conversation, you’re gonna put it right, we’ll try that right. So stupid. We’re going to try to we’re going to try to put that in a real conversation. How can we troubleshoot what’s going on? You may be learning about diabetes, too. We have one family here, who’s the mom who’s had it for 50 years and other family who may be very new to it. So you’re all learning together? I can’t imagine I have a friend whose child was diagnosed a month before her child went to college, and she took an apartment near the college, which I think some people would be very scornful, Abell but I thought was a great idea. You’re all learning together. And she was like, I need to be there to go to doctors and figure stuff out and does he have a shot in his hand, like she had no idea what to do. And then a month after that, she came back. So we all do this in our own ways. But But diabetes is a huge learning experience. So I think putting that time aside to be like, Okay, can we try it this way? And if your kid doesn’t go for it, you know, maybe not the best idea, but I’d also you know, if you’re super worried about complications, and oh my gosh, that 300 is going to keep me up all night. Talk to your endo once again, asked to see the most recent studies all of the studies show that kids diagnosed today are going to be super healthy. You know, even elevated blood glucose is not going to hurt them in the long run. There’s a lot I mean, I’m a I’m a little Mary sunshine I get pushback a lot that I’m too positive but the EDIC study the EI E D IC will will change your life. So go look that up.

 

Anna Floreen Sabino  53:16

I had no CGM offer years of college my A1C was never below and 8.3. And I’ve had two healthy kids, no complications, my eyes kidneys are fine. Not to say that like I am a poster child in any way, shape, or form. But I definitely go over 200 Everyday still, and I try my hardest. And yeah, I hope that is helpful. I hope that doesn’t just sugarcoat life, there are going to be days that are just hard because they’re hard. And I think this is a massive life transition, a massive life transition. And they say it takes like six to eight weeks for anything to sort of settle into a routine. I’m still feeling that big time where I’m in the Boston area. We’re only in like week, three week two of the first five day week of school. And my kids are bonkers.

 

Stacey Simms  54:11

Can I quit while I just want to share a quick story that my son shared with me. So Benny is is I sent him in a you might recognize this. I sent him the world’s okayest diabetic embroidery. I don’t know who’s seen that off to put it on Facebook. I was like, Yeah, sure. It’s like the world’s okayest mom or whatever, versus the rules, okay, as diabetic. So I sent him that, because that’s what he is. He is super into his automated system. He changes his infusion sets. He fills his cartridge, but like he’s not checking his blood sugar all day long. But he called me the only time he’s really reported in about diabetes was he had a really, really tough night he had changed his infusion set and went to bed. And it didn’t take right was kinked something was the matter, whatever. And he was, you know, I’m sure that he just ignored it all night. And he woke up feeling like trash. And he had to deal with that. And he had to figure it out and had to do it. And he just, I mean, I did not see the numbers because I don’t have Dexcom. But I’m sure he was high, like just the word all night. And that is so hard to hear, right? I’m so sad for him. Because what? I’m sorry, what a crappy night. But what I said to him was, that sucks. I hate to hear that. I hope you’re feeling better. And he was like, Yeah, I’m fine. I’m chugging water, you know, blah, blah, blah. And then five minutes later, I texted him back, because it occurred to me, I was like, Thank you for telling me that. Like, oh, my gosh, I couldn’t I just was like, it almost went by so quickly. But I was like, Wow, thank you for telling me that. Because now I feel like okay, I don’t have I’m worried. But I know he’s gonna tell me when stuff goes south. Yeah. And that was cool.

 

Anna Floreen Sabino  55:51

That was really cool. And that’s exactly what you want to happen. That’s what you want to happen. Like, in January, February, April, July, as you still have these like, eight 910 11 months to practice these scenarios. You want them to call you in November when the you’re there at some retreat saying like, Mom, I’m stuck. I don’t know what to do. I thought I had enough insulin, you know, whatever. This is like ridiculous. Yeah. Like you. That’s that building trust. But it’s also building self advocacy. And it takes a lot of guts to put themselves out there and feel a little bit more vulnerable. And to your point, like, it does suck to feel so high like to try to go to class when your blood sugar’s high, and you haven’t had insulin and your site kinked or whatever the reason was, that happened to me last weekend, I felt, and you still have to go on your day. Yeah, we’ll have to go to class. I mean, you could just not go to class and have the, you know, accommodations in place. But most people don’t want to do that. Most people just want to go to class, because it’s easier, give the injection and go. That’s what I did. I was like, no, no, you know how to do this pull through? And?

 

Diane Rose  56:58

Yeah, yep. No, I think that’s I mean, like, all of it, you’re filling my cup with, you know, a young adult. And I think the feedback that we’re getting in the chats, thank you for those, you know, your parents that are like, open and sharing with us about your experience, your fears, your worries, and even just being open to hearing like another perspective, that’s, that’s what it’s all about, right? Like we keep supporting each other. Yeah. We’re getting to the end of our time, we’re actually no, we’re at the end of our time. And we could probably do this for another hour. But I want to be mindful of everyone’s evenings and, and childcare and things to do. One of the things we didn’t get to talk about, but that I just want to acknowledge is the concept of self care. And all parents have all felt that like you, you know, you can’t fill from an empty cup. One of the things that I would encourage all of our parents to think about and would have asked you each, we had time, and we don’t really, so but maybe if there’s some stuff in the chat, how do you do that? I know like, at least as a parent, you know, if especially right now, if you’ve just drop your kid off, it feels different at home, it probably feels a little empty, it probably feels a little lonely or you know, you’re craving that connection that like daily text with your young adult. Or maybe you’re used to like being in it and like you said, following watching those numbers interacting with them daily, it’s different. So how do you how do you navigate that self care piece as a caregiver as a parent, fill your own cup, keep it together. I think the title or one of this event is like staying sane while they’re off living their best lives, like keeping it together for yourself so you can show up for them. So quickly for either of you. Do you have any like tips or tricks, Stacey something that like works for you, that’s like your go to Anna for you, or that you recommend to parents?

 

Stacey Simms  58:46

Yeah, I’ll be very quick. I got three, you’ve got to be selfish, and start being selfish as a mom as early as an orphan as possible. I know this is very difficult for most of us. Put at the back of your mind. being selfish is a wonderful thing. You’re not going to be a terrible person, you’re not going to be very, very selfish. do stuff with other diabetes, moms, things like this. On Being in the Facebook group, doing local meetups, if you know anybody locally, take them out for coffee, go to Panera say, I’m going to be here Thursday at noon. If one person comes great if 20 people comes even better, but just do it. I’m here. Put yourself out there. Don’t be shy. And then of course moms Night Out is really what you should do. And we could talk about that at the very end. But that’s a big event for more moms but do stuff with other moms who get it. They’re really really is very important. Also, it’s a good idea. I hate I don’t It’s not judging. If you’ve always stayed home with your kids. That is so awesome and wonderful. Do not lose yourself. Who are you? What do you like to do? What makes you happy what Jazz’s you up outside your kids, figure that out and do it. It’s never too late. You can go back to school, you can just sit and read a book. You know, cleaning your house makes you happy, great quilting. I don’t know singing jazz, whatever, figure out what makes you happy and pursue that If you have little kids,

 

Anna Floreen Sabino  1:00:02

I don’t think I have anything else to add. But like that number one man on like, be selfish, like, I booked a pedicure today for Friday. And I think it depends on your age kids, right? I sneak in an hour to do something like that. And between my last client and by pick up my kid that preschool like, Okay, I bring my book, I don’t bring my laptop, and like, that’s my self care. But I also think like, you have to set boundaries for yourself too. And the last thing I’ll say is just just practice, like, you don’t have to be with your kid 24/7 Nobody wants that. I don’t want that. And they don’t want that. So lean into what you love and keep, keep filling that cup in whatever way it makes sense to you.

 

Diane Rose  1:00:47

Love it. Thank you both so much. I’m dropping into the chat where you guys were talking my email here, just for No, I’ve dropped in some links to the resource hub. If anyone wants to get connected to either Anna or Stacey, and the work that they do. You’re welcome. Just email me and I’ll connect you. We’ll put some links in the chat as well. And we’ll send them up actually in your follow up email for the recording, too to Anna’s business finding smiles coaching, she’s got specifically anatomically I’ve got this right hoping for caregivers course that starting in like in a few weeks, it’s like a little mini course but literally where you’re working with caregivers like this. So

 

Anna Floreen Sabino  1:01:28

yeah, it’s a three part mini series, burnout, boundaries, communication, all that good stuff. I also work with a lot of college students separately, one on one. So

 

Diane Rose  1:01:40

for student or for the parent and to your to your point, diabetes link is proud to start sponsoring some of the moms night out events, it’s a great opportunity to and to be in person I know I’m hoping to get my self to one. And as you mentioned there is you’ve so generously offered a discount code to the diabetes link and we’ll share that out in the email as well but it is I just want to cosign like it’s a great opportunity if one of Stacy’s events is coming near you to like meet up and just spend some some of that self care and like community time with other moms who get what you’re going through. It’s good stuff.

 

Stacey Simms  1:02:19

We got cocktails, and mocktails. Great.

 

Diane Rose  1:02:22

Oh my gosh, definitely, definitely sign me up. Be sure to check out the resource hub. That’s my last plug. Like it’s mostly for young adults. The Diabetes link is an organization does a ton of work. And we have done a ton of work of moving all of like the work we’ve done over the years and supporting your young adult with things that we talked about tonight, partying and drinking and substances and how to talk to your roommates, and how to deal with accommodations and what accommodations to request. And all of that’s on the hub. And there’s a section for parents and caregivers as well. Some like great just perspective and things to kind of help support you support them. And that’s what we’re here for. Thank you for joining us. Keep an eye out for that email. Don’t hesitate to reach out. Connect with us in the Facebook group and we’ll talk to you all later. Thank you. Thank you Stacey and Anna. Bye, everybody.

 

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

 

[podcast src=”https://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/28114829/height/90/theme/custom/thumbnail/yes/direction/forward/render-playlist/no/custom-color/3e9ccc/” width=”100%” scrolling=”no” class=”podcast-class” frameborder=”0″ placement=”top” primary_content_url=”http://traffic.libsyn.com/diabetesconnections/Ep_592_Final_In_the_News.mp3″ libsyn_item_id=”28114829″ height=”90″ theme=”custom” custom_color=”3e9ccc” player_use_thumbnail=”use_thumbnail” use_download_link=”use_download_link” download_link_text=”Download the episode” /]It’s In the News, a look at the top stories and headlines from the diabetes community happening now. Top stories this week: a new CGM from Medtronic is approved in Europe, semaglutides for people newly diagnosed type 1 may make a huge difference, a look at Keto diet for kids, Apple teases non-invasive glucose monitoring and Dexcom U is back!

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Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I’m Stacey Simms and these are the top diabetes stories and headlines happening now
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In the news is brought to you by Edgepark simplify your diabetes journey with Edgepark
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Our top this story this week a new CGM from Medtronic gets approval in Europe. It’s called Simplera – an all in one disposable CGM– no fingersticks and no over-tape, which is new for Medtronic. Simplera is integrated with the InPen™ smart insulin pen, which provides real-time, personalized dosing guidance to help simplify diabetes management. Medtronic will begin a phased launch at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) 59th Annual Meeting in Hamburg, Germany on Oct. 2-6, 2023.
Simplera™ is indicated for ages 2+ and compatible with iOS and Android. Simplera™ is not approved by the FDA and is limited to investigational use in the U.S. Medtronic’s automated insulin delivery (AID) system integrated with this next-generation sensor is currently under review for CE Mark and is not commercially available in the U.S. or in Europe. I’ve reached out to Medtronic – we’ll learn more soon.
https://news.medtronic.com/2023-09-21-Medtronic-Diabetes-announces-CE-Mark-for-new-Simplera-TM-CGM-with-disposable-all-in-one-design
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A small study and a long way to go here, but a weekly dose of semaglutide, helped seven out of 10 patients newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes stop taking insulin after three to six months. Semaglutide is the key ingredient in Ozempic.. approved for type 2 and Wegovy, approved for weight loss. It’s also thought to tamp down the inflammation that can lead to the destruction of insulin-producing cells.
He noted previous research has shown that patients with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes still have the ability to make some of their own insulin, so the team tested semaglutide in patients within three months of their diagnosis. All ten patients were taking meal time and long acting insulin. After three months, all of them came off meal time insulin, and seven stopped basal insulin. Much more study needed here.. interestingly. Ozempic’s maker, Novo Nordisk noted it didn’t sponsor this study and isn’t pursuing trials of semaglutide for type 1 diabetes itself,
https://www.cbsnews.com/philadelphia/news/semaglutide-ozempic-wagovy-type-1-diabetes-insulin-study/

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a widely used diabetes drug that controls blood sugar can also prevent muscle atrophy and muscular fibrosis—which can help the elderly bounce back faster from injury or illness. Researchers from the University of Utah Health have found that Metformin has surprising applications on a cellular level. Their findings were published in the journal Aging Cell.
“We saw two things in our study,” Drummond says. “When participants took Metformin during a bed rest, they had less muscle atrophy. During the recovery period, their muscles also had less fibrosis or excessive collagen. That build-up can make it harder for the muscle to properly function.”

Researchers Discover Surprising Side Effect of Common Diabetes Drug


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Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) say they have created a device for people with type 1 diabetes that may help produce insulin when needed.

Their findings were published on September 18 in The Proceeding of the National Academy of Science.

The MIT engineers reported that the small implantable device could carry hundreds of thousands of insulin-producing islet cells. Previous devices made for the same purpose failed and stopped producing insulin because they ran out of oxygen needed to create the insulin.

To combat this, the scientists created an oxygen factory on the device, allowing it to generate oxygen by splitting water vapor in the body.

The researchers said the device could potentially replace insulin injections in people with type 1 diabetes.

Dr. Caroline Messer, an endocrinologist at Northwell Lenox Hill Hospital in New York, not involved in the study, explained to Medical News Today:

“Currently, islet cell transplant is limited to patients with a history of severe metabolic complications and consistent failure of insulin-based therapies. Long-term success rates are low, and patients require lifelong immunosuppressive therapy. Conceptually, implantable islet cells that do not require immune suppression and create their own source of oxygen is nothing short of brilliant.”
MIT researchers said the device kept glucose levels stable for at least one month when implanted into mice. The device has not yet been tested in humans.

Researchers hope to create a larger version of the device and test it in people with type 1 diabetes. They expect this device to be about the size of a stick of chewing gum.

“We are eager to see this technology translate, but it does take time,” said Dan Anderson, PhD, the study’s lead author and a professor of chemistry at MIT. “We hope to see this technology in humans within at most four years.”

Although the researchers remained focused on treating diabetes, they indicate this kind of device might be able to be adapted to treat other illnesses that require repeated delivery of therapeutic proteins.

“This technology allows for an improvement in the current approach to implantation of units containing cells that produce insulin in response to blood glucose levels without requiring invasive surgery,” said Dr. Eliud Sifonte, an endocrinologist at NYU Langone Medical Associates, who was not involved in the study.

“Historically, this approach has been difficult to maintain due to an inability to provide a good oxygen supply to those implanted cells,” Dr. Sifonte told MNT.
https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/how-a-new-device-may-help-with-insulin-production-for-type-1-diabetes
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Weight Watchers and Abbott announce their new app for people with diabetes. This is a WW app that integrates the use of a Freestyle Libre.
The app helps people with diabetes understand how food and activity impact their glucose levels. WeightWatchers had a team of nutrition and behavioral science experts designed its tailored plan. It aims to help people with type 2 diabetes form helpful habits and meet their health goals.

The plan has demonstrated success in helping people with diabetes lose weight and lower their HbA1c, the company said.

Abbott, WeightWatchers unveil connected diabetes app


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Italy celiac
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Keto and other low carbohydrate diets have gained popularity for type 2 diabetes in adults, but there are safety concerns for young people, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) cautioned.

Restricting carbohydrates in young people at risk for or with diabetes raises concerns for growth deceleration, nutritional deficiencies, poor bone health, nutritional ketosis, and disordered eating behaviors, Tamara Hannon, MD, of Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis, and colleagues on the AAP Committee on Nutrition wrote in a clinical report to guide care.

Based on demonstrated risks, low- and very low-carbohydrate diets were not recommended for children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes, “except under close diabetes care team supervision utilizing safety guidelines,” the group wrote in Pediatricsopens in a new tab or window.

Low-carb (<26% of daily calories), very low-carb (20-50 g per day) and ketogenic (<20 g per day) diets limit foods that can be included compared with the typically recommended diet, where 45% to 65% of the total calories come from carbohydrates.

Rather than cutting all carbs, the policy document urged focusing on reducing children’s consumption of nutrient-poor processed snacks and sugary beverages but keeping healthy carbs found in vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and legumes.

However, there was a warning for clinicians in how they approach these conversations.

Hannon’s group pointed to a survey conducted with an international social media-based group of adults and parents of young people with type 1 diabetes who chose to use low- or very low-carbohydrate diets as adjunct treatment. “Respondents reported excellent glycemic control but poor relationships with diabetes care providers associated with distrust and feeling judged about their diabetes management decisions,” Hannon and colleagues wrote.

The medical team might do the most good when patients and their families elect to follow these diets by not alienating them.

 

However, they added, “Long-term outcomes of youth following carbohydrate-restricted diets on diabetes and cardiovascular outcomes are needed and may be underreported because of attrition.”
For young people with prediabetes or type 1 or 2 diabetes for whom weight loss or maintenance is indicated, pediatricians can counsel them that a reduced energy diet — irrespective of carbohydrate content — is most important to that end, the authors noted.

However, any dietary restriction “can be associated with physical, metabolic, and psychological consequences, including risk for disordered eating in children and adolescents, with additional risk for those with diabetes,” Hannon and colleagues noted.
As for carbohydrate restriction in young people at risk for or with diabetes, the hope is for more data.

Going forward, “we need longitudinal studies of growth and development in children/families who choose to utilize low-carb diets for the purposes of diabetes management,” Hannon told MedPage Today. “We need studies that investigate more longer-term outcomes, including the possible risks and benefits.”
https://www.medpagetoday.com/pediatrics/generalpediatrics/106386
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Commercial – Edgepark
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DexCom (NASDAQ:DXCM), Tandem Diabetes Care (NASDAQ:TNDM), and Insulet (NASDAQ:PODD) all closed lower Thursday following a report that Apple (AAPL) has named a new head for its project to develop a glucose monitor that doesn’t require a skin prick for a blood sample.
Bloomberg reported that VP of Platform Architecture Tim Millet is now heading the project, known as E5. The plan would be to add blood glucose monitor capability to the Apple Watch.
Millet has been with Apple (AAPL) for 19 years.
DexCom fell 3.5%, Tandem (TNDM) was off 4.3%, and Insulet (PODD) lost 1.3%.
https://seekingalpha.com/news/4012056-dexcom-tandem-diabetes-fall-apple-glucose-monitor-new-team-lead
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the global leader in real-time continuous glucose monitoring for people with diabetes, announced today the launch of the second season of Dexcom U, the first-ever NIL (name, image, likeness) program exclusively for college athletes with diabetes, which had its inaugural season last year.

“I’m elated to come back for my second year and continue to show I can accomplish anything while living with diabetes”

Tweet this
Dexcom U is a unique NIL program that was created in response to a 2022 survey which found that improving representation for people with diabetes can inspire future generations of athletes living with the condition. With about 17% of student athletes at Division I institutions participating in NIL activities in 20221 and that number expected to grow, Dexcom U is still the only NIL program designed to celebrate college athletes with diabetes and inspire people with diabetes who have athletic dreams of their own.

Throughout the last year, athletes on the Dexcom U inaugural roster participated in 381 collegiate competitions with the help of Dexcom continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) technology. The impact of the program is set to expand in 2023 as the roster size grows by 43%.

“In response to last year’s launch, we heard from parents of young children, coaches and athletes with diabetes who felt seen through the stories of Dexcom U athletes,” said Teri Lawver, Executive Vice President, Chief Commercial Officer at Dexcom. “We’re thrilled to expand the program in year two and continue celebrating these inspirational collegiate athletes while proving that diabetes does not have to hold you back.”

Dexcom not only understands the pivotal role technology plays in helping athletes with diabetes feel and perform at their best, but also the importance of support from others who understand what it’s like to strive for athletic excellence while managing diabetes. A Dexcom survey showed nearly half (48%) of adults with Type 1 diabetes and parents to children with diabetes believe that being aware of a professional or top amateur athlete or celebrity with Type 1 diabetes would be very beneficial for a newly diagnosed individual,2 which is why mentorship continues to be a cornerstone of the program.

The Dexcom U 2023 roster consists of 20 athletes, including 11 new teammates, all who rely on Dexcom CGM to track their glucose levels* and manage their diabetes:

Amber Jackson, Track & Field, University of Louisville
Ava DeStefon, Cheerleading, Clemson University
Beau Corrales, Football, Texas State University
Bri Carrasquillo, Lacrosse, Yale University
Bryce Frederick, Baseball, Towson University
Cade Brown, Baseball, Murray State University
Caleb Fauria, Football, University of Colorado
Dante Vasquez, Football, Springfield College
Isaac Traudt, Basketball, Creighton University
Jaime Ferrer, Baseball, Florida State University
Jaxon Dowell, Golf, University of Oklahoma
Jessica Walter, Softball, Providence College
Joshua Meriwether, Football, Tennessee State University
Leo Giannoni, Baseball, Columbus State University
Madison Moraja, Track & Field, North Carolina State University
Marlee Fray, Soccer, University of Texas at San Antonio
Nicholas Hahne, Cheerleading, University of Notre Dame
Paris Husic, Track & Field, Wake Forest University
Raegan Lantz, Volleyball, Miami University
Tristan Wakefield, Rowing, Syracuse University
“I’m elated to come back for my second year and continue to show I can accomplish anything while living with diabetes,” said Bri Carrasquillo, Lacrosse player at Yale University and second-year member of Dexcom U. “My Dexcom CGM allows me to play at my highest level, while giving me, my coaches and family peace of mind by tracking my glucose levels through the Follow app.† I feel it’s important to educate others about the tools available that have made such a difference in my diabetes management.”

As part of the program, Dexcom has created educational resources for athletes with diabetes as well as for parents, coaches and teammates so they can better understand the disease and how to support the people with diabetes in their lives. Resources include first-hand advice from Dexcom U athletes as well as tips for managing diabetes, exercise and mental wellbeing – on and off the field.

“It’s a privilege to join such a special group of athletes and shed light on the important mission of Dexcom U,” said Dante Vasquez, football player Springfield College and first-year member of the program. “Not only does being part of Dexcom U give me confidence to perform at my highest levels with my Dexcom G7, but it empowers me to be a mentor and inspire the next generation of athletes with diabetes.”
https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20230919150027/en/Dexcom-U-Kicks-off-2023-Season-With-Expanded-Roster-of-Athletes-With-Diabetes-Building-on-First-of-its-Kind-NIL-Program
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I’ve been organizing local parent meetups in Charlotte, NC since my son was diagnosed with type one back in 2006. Earlier this year, I thought it would be fun to see if we could do more than our usual coffee or lunch.

As the host of Diabetes Connections podcast, I’ve been to dozens of conferences and spoken at meetups around the country. I took the best elements of all those events and put them together. We’d have all the technology companies, great speakers, cocktails, crafts, and it would be an overnight, a true D-Mom getaway.

The response blew me away.

“This must be how our kids feel at diabetes camp!” said Liz Kroger, who came from a few towns over. “So awesome to be surrounded by ‘our people’ who just get it without explanation.”

Jessica Higgins traveled from Florida! “I was craving other moms who knew how I was feeling,” she said. “I will definitely attend again; it was like spending a night with old friends!”

After we shared the idea on social media, I heard from moms all over the country who wanted an event in their town. I’m planning three more events in the next few months and will announce more for 2024 and beyond.

Registration is open for the next three stops: Oct 13th in Frisco, TX, Oct 27th in Providence, RI and Feb 2nd in Charlotte, NC. More info: https://bit.ly/DMomsNightOut and save $30 off registration with the promo code “MOM30”

Diabetes Connections presents Moms’ Night Out is more than just a good time. Here are 7 reasons to put it on your calendar today:

1. Community Support: Attending an event specifically tailored for moms of children with type 1 diabetes provides an opportunity to connect with others going through similar experiences. Sharing stories, challenges, and triumphs with others who understand the unique demands of managing their child’s diabetes can provide a tremendous sense of support and solidarity.

2. Emotional Well-being: Taking care of a child with type 1 diabetes can be emotionally challenging. Moms often carry a heavy load of responsibility and often experience stress, anxiety, or burnout. Attending a moms’ night out event allows them to take a break from their routine and focus on self-care. It provides a safe space to relax, unwind, and engage in activities that promote their emotional well-being.

3. Educational Opportunities: These events feature expert speakers, healthcare professionals and industry leaders who share valuable information and insights about managing type 1 diabetes. Moms can learn about the latest research, treatment options, technologies, and strategies for effectively supporting their child’s diabetes management. Acquiring knowledge and staying up to date can empower moms to make informed decisions and enhance their child’s quality of life.

4. Peer-to-peer Learning: Besides formal presentations, these events encourage interactive discussions and networking. Moms can learn from each other’s experiences, strategies, and tips for dealing with various aspects of type 1 diabetes management. Sharing practical advice and success stories can inspire and motivate moms to implement new approaches in their own lives.

5. Break from Caregiver Role: Moms often put their children’s needs first, sometimes neglecting their own self-care. This allows them to take a well-deserved break and focus on their own needs. It’s an opportunity to relax, socialize, and recharge their emotional batteries. By prioritizing their well-being, moms can better support their children’s diabetes management in the long run.

6. Access to Resources: Moms can gather information about local organizations, diabetes camps, educational programs, and online communities that provide ongoing support and resources for both themselves and their children.

7. Creating Lasting Friendships: These connections can extend beyond the event and provide a network of support in their day-to-day lives. Having someone to reach out to, share experiences with, and seek advice from can be incredibly valuable for moms navigating the challenges of managing their child’s diabetes.

Bonus #8 – It’s fun! Where else can you enjoy a cocktail (or mocktail) while sharing stories about the weirdest place you’ve treated your child’s low BG or comparing strategies for sleepovers?

“The best part was being with my people. People who speak the same diabetes language. People who understand your concerns, hang-ups, and fears,” said Beth McCrary. “Do everything possible to attend. MNO is therapy for your soul!”

Hope to see you at the next MNO! Registration is open, learn more here: https://bit.ly/DMomsNightOut

-Stacey

 

 

[podcast src=”https://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/28055901/height/90/theme/custom/thumbnail/yes/direction/forward/render-playlist/no/custom-color/3e9ccc/” width=”100%” scrolling=”no” class=”podcast-class” frameborder=”0″ placement=”top” primary_content_url=”http://traffic.libsyn.com/diabetesconnections/Ep_591_Final_Sarah_Climbing_Guide.mp3″ libsyn_item_id=”28055901″ height=”90″ theme=”custom” custom_color=”3e9ccc” player_use_thumbnail=”use_thumbnail” use_download_link=”use_download_link” download_link_text=”Download the episode” /]This week, it’s one thing to push yourself when you live with type 1 diabetes.. we talk a lot about extreme athletes with T1D, but it’s another thing to live with diabetes when others rely on you for their safety. Sarah Janin is an outdoor adventure guide for sports like rock climbing and ice climbing and avalanche education.

Sarah was diagnosed with type 1 as a toddler, in a time before meters, let alone CGMs, and is incredibly honest about her struggles. She’s thriving with diabetes now and she shares what she does to keep herself and her clients safe in the outdoors that she absolutely loves.

More about Sarah here

 

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

Moms’ Night Out Info 

 

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Take Control with Afrezza 

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

Instagram

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Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

 

 

[podcast src=”https://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/27993174/height/90/theme/custom/thumbnail/yes/direction/forward/render-playlist/no/custom-color/3e9ccc/” width=”100%” scrolling=”no” class=”podcast-class” frameborder=”0″ placement=”top” primary_content_url=”http://traffic.libsyn.com/diabetesconnections/Ep_590_Final_Glucagon_Stoners.mp3″ libsyn_item_id=”27993174″ height=”90″ theme=”custom” custom_color=”3e9ccc” player_use_thumbnail=”use_thumbnail” use_download_link=”use_download_link” download_link_text=”Download the episode” /]Most of us wouldn’t think twice about using someone else’s emergency glucagon if our child or another adult needed it. But that’s something a school nurse or other health care provider could lose their license over. Now, some states are passing legislation to make it easier for anyone to use any one’s rescue glucagon.

We talk to Georgia State Rep. Doug Stoner and his wife, Trip Stoner, a long-time diabetes advocate who lives with type 1 about what they were able to get passed in their state, what you can do to take action in yours, and what they’re planning next to help people with diabetes.

Find your legislators here 

Read Georgia’s glucagon bill here 

Contact Doug here: Rep.DougStoner@gmail.com

Moms’ Night Out Registration is OPEN

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Take Control with Afrezza 

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

Instagram

Twitter

Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

 

 

[podcast src=”https://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/27973380/height/90/theme/custom/thumbnail/yes/direction/forward/render-playlist/no/custom-color/3e9ccc/” width=”100%” scrolling=”no” class=”podcast-class” frameborder=”0″ placement=”top” primary_content_url=”http://traffic.libsyn.com/diabetesconnections/Ep_589_Final_In_the_News.mp3″ libsyn_item_id=”27973380″ height=”90″ theme=”custom” custom_color=”3e9ccc” player_use_thumbnail=”use_thumbnail” use_download_link=”use_download_link” download_link_text=”Download the episode” /]It’s In the News, a look at the top stories and headlines from the diabetes community happening now. Top stories this week: Abbott acquires Bigfoot, a new study looks at low-dose aspirin to prevent type 2, researchers look into whether the AI ChatGPT can answer FAQs about diabetes, Beyond Type Run is back for the NYC Marathon, and more!

Our previous episode with Bigfoot Biomedical: https://diabetes-connections.com/?s=bigfoot

Join us for Moms’ Night Out! (use promo code School30 to save)

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Take Control with Afrezza 

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Learn about Edgepark

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

Instagram

Twitter

Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I’m Stacey Simms and these are the top diabetes stories and headlines happening now
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In the news is brought to you by Edgepark simplify your diabetes journey with Edgepark
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Our top story this week – Abbott scoops up Bigfoot Biomedical. The deal is expected to close later this year – no financial terms yet disclosed. Abbott and Bigfoot have worked together since 2017 on a connected insulin pen system. Bigfoot Unity exclusively works with Abbott’s FreeStyle Libre® Long time listeners will recall that Bigfoot was founded in 2015 around serving people with type 1 diabetes with a closed loop pump system that Byran Mazlish had developed for his wife and son. Mazlish was very secretive at first about the algorithm – this was before people were sure the FDA wouldn’t crack down on them – so a journalist nicknamed him Bigfoot. Along the way, the company pivoted to CGM connected SmartPens. I believe Bigfoot was my third interview, back in 2015 – I’ll ink up all of the interviews I’ve done with them in the show notes.

Home


https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/abbott-to-acquire-bigfoot-biomedical-furthering-efforts-to-develop-personalized-connected-solutions-for-people-with-diabetes-301918254.html
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Low-dose aspirin reduces the risk for type 2 diabetes among older adults and slows the increase in fasting glucose levels over time, new research finds.

The data come from a secondary analysis of ASPREE, a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of healthy adults aged 65 years or older, showing that 100 mg of aspirin taken daily for about 5 years did not provide a cardiovascular benefit but did significantly raise the risk for bleeding. It’s a big study, more than 16-thousand people.

This new analysis shows that individuals taking aspirin had a 15% lower risk for developing type 2 diabetes and that the medication slowed the rate of increase in fasting plasma glucose, compared with placebo, during follow-up.

However, lead author Sophia Zoungas, MBBS, PhD, head of the School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia, says, “Major prescribing guidelines now recommend older adults take daily aspirin only when there is a medical reason to do so, such as after a heart attack… Although these new findings are of interest, they do not change the clinical advice about aspirin use in older people at this time.”
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/996058
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A class-action lawsuit filed against Medtronic (NYSE: MDT)+
alleges that the company’s insulin delivery devices shared patient data with third parties.
The lawsuit — filed by the plaintiff “A.H.” in U.S. District Court in Central California — levels allegations against Medtronic and its MiniMed and InPen devices. It addresses MiniMed’s transmission and disclosure of personally identifiable information and protected health information to Google and other third parties.

Per the lawsuit, the data was transmitted via tracking and authentication technology, including Google Analytics, Crashlytics, Firebase Authentication and related tools. A.H. says these technologies, installed on the website and/or mobile applications, include the InPen iOS and Android applications.

“Information about a person’s health is among the most confidential and sensitive information in society, and its mishandling can have serious consequences, including embarrassment, discrimination, and denial of insurance coverage,” the lawsuit reads.

A Medtronic spokesperson issued the following statement via email:
We have strong processes, technologies, and people in place to safeguard and protect our information and systems, the information of our business partners, and most importantly, the privacy and safety of the patients and healthcare providers that use our products.”

Lawsuit alleges ‘potentially problematic’ patient data sharing from Medtronic Diabetes devices


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Interesting new way to look at type 2 – not weight loss or medication, but about reducing how much blood glucose goes up and stays up after eating and drinking. University of Virginia Daniel Cox says this is called Glucose Everyday Matters, or GEM – aims to prevent blood sugar spikes via educated food and drink selection. This is coupled with physical activity to hasten recovery when blood-sugar spikes do occur. So someone might indulge in a piece of fruit or a small, sweet treat, knowing how it will affect them, and then go for an evening stroll to help even out their blood sugar.
Sounds really simple, but in its first study, it helps almost 70-percent of people put their type 2 into remission without weight loss or medication.
The National Institutes of Health has provided $3.5 million for a large-scale clinical trial
Cox himself went from an A1C of 10.3 at the time of diagnoses to reading consistently under 6.0 for the past 13 years on no medication using his approach.

Radical New Approach to Managing Type 2 Diabetes Receives $3.5 Million

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Final preparations are in place to initiate the first clinical site for DIAGNODE-3 in the United States, and additional sites are expected to be initiated over the coming months. Approximately 10-12 clinical sites across the US are planned to be initiated, expanding the DIAGNODE-3 trial in the US and eight European countries to approximately 60 clincal sites in total. DIAGNODE-3 is designed to confirm the efficacy and safety of the antigen-specific immunotherapy Diamyd® in patients aged 12 to 29 years recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and carrying the genetic HLA DR3-DQ2 marker.
Approximately 40% of all screened patients carry the genetic HLA DR3-DQ2 haplotype. This proportion aligns well with expectations based on previous Diamyd® clinical trials and published epidemiological research. Supported by published retrospective analyses and prospective clinical trials, the presence of the genetic HLA DR3-DQ2 haplotype determines the likelihood of responding to Diamyd® therapy, and serves as one of the main inclusion criteria in the DIAGNODE-3 trial.

“Patient recruitment is a complex and central element in any trial and it is encouraging to see a significant and continuous uptick in the screening rate and that the observed frequency of the genetically defined responder group enrolled into DIAGNODE-3 confirms our previous observations”, says Ulf Hannelius, President & CEO of Diamyd Medical. “This shows the operational and clinical feasibility of our precision medicine approach to Type 1 Diabetes and we look forward to expanding the trial to the United States”.
https://finance.yahoo.com/news/registrational-phase-iii-trial-type-142600082.html
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A low-carbohydrate diet during pregnancy may have some benefits in gestational diabetes, but overall, low-carbohydrate diets are not associated with any significant differences in outcomes. That was the conclusion of a presentation at the ADA Scientific Sessions. That was back in June but I just learned about it, so I’m passing along to you in case you missed it as well.

During a debate at the American Diabetes Association Scientific Sessions, Amy M. Valent, DO, MCR, associate professor in the division of maternal-fetal medicine in the department of obstetrics and gynecology at Oregon Health & Science University, said identifying

Teri L. Hernandez, PhD, RN, associate dean of research and scholarship in the College of Nursing and professor in the department of medicine and the division of endocrinology, metabolism and diabetes at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, agreed that the first line of therapy with gestational diabetes is nutrition. However, Hernandez said, low-carbohydrate diets are not the only approach in gestational diabetes treatment with nutrition.
Currently, dietary advice for treating gestational diabetes is inconsistent, and current professional guidelines have limitations and biases, according to Valent. Different diet strategies include low-carbohydrate, low glycemic index and total energy restriction eating plans, according to Valent. Valent said ACOG guidelines recommended a low-carbohydrate diet for gestational diabetes until the most recently revised edition in January.

Valent reviewed several major landmark studies demonstrating that gestational diabetes treatment can decrease pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia and large for gestational age infants.

“These studies were in the era where treatment of diabetes in pregnancy involved recommending a low-carbohydrate diet,” Valent said. “The concern with lowering carbohydrates is the risk of consuming lower nutrient-dense foods and resulting in the body to produce ketones, which may be associated with negative effects on the developing baby.”

“Pregnancy is dynamic. Nobody’s the same today as they were yesterday. They’re going to be different 1, 2 or 3 weeks from now, and the nutritional demands and the fetal growth and development stage are going to be different,” Valent said. “So, nutritional demands are going to vary.”

Hernandez also added that women and girls tend to be priced out of good nutritional patterns, which is an issue not only in the pregnancy field, but also in the global community. According to Hernandez, it is important to create ways moving forward to identify what nutritional patterns are best that are also affordable for families, especially in lower-income settings.
https://www.healio.com/news/womens-health-ob-gyn/20230905/experts-debate-benefits-of-lowcarb-diets-for-gestational-diabetes

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Commercial – Edgepark
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Can ChatGPT help answer questions about diabetes?
In a recent study published in the journal PLoS ONE, researchers tested chatGPT, a language model geared for discussion, to investigate whether it could answer frequently asked diabetes questions.

In the present study, researchers evaluated ChatGPT’s expertise in diabetes, especially the capacity to answer commonly requested questions related to diabetes in a similar manner as humans.
The ‘Frequently Asked Questions’ section of the Diabetes Association of Denmark’s website, viewed on 10 January 2023, included eight questions. The researchers designed the remaining questions to correlate to particular lines on the ‘Knowledge Center for Diabetes website and a report on physical activity and diabetes mellitus type 1.

Across the 10 questions, the proportion of correct responses ranged from 38% to 74%. Participants correctly identified ChatGPT-generated replies 60% of the time, which was over the non-inferiority threshold. Males and females had 64% and 58% chances of accurately recognizing the artificial intelligence-generated response, respectively. Individuals who had past contact with diabetes patients had a 61% chance of precisely answering the questions, compared to 57% for those who had no prior contact with diabetes patients.
In contrast to the initial premise, participants could discern between ChatGPT-generated and human-written replies better than tossing a fair coin.
While ChatGPT demonstrated some potential for accurately answering frequently asked questions, issues around misinformation and the lack of nuanced, personalized advice were evident. As large language models increasingly intersect with healthcare, rigorous studies are essential to evaluate their safety, efficacy, and ethical considerations in patient care, emphasizing the need for robust regulatory frameworks and continuous oversight.

https://www.news-medical.net/news/20230905/Can-ChatGPT-be-a-diabetes-consultant-Study-probes-the-potential-and-pitfalls.aspx
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SAN MATEO, Calif., Aug. 24, 2023 /PRNewswire/ — On November 5, diabetes nonprofit Beyond Type 1 will join more than 550 official charity partners and philanthropists raising awareness and funds while participating in the world’s largest marathon, the TCS New York City Marathon. This year, the organization is expanding its 50-person team, Beyond Type Run, to include people living with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, as well as caregivers to those living with diabetes.

“Since 2017, we’ve featured more than 200 runners on our teams who’ve exemplified what it means to survive and thrive with diabetes,” said Beyond Type 1 CEO Deborah Dugan.

Beyond Type 1 announces the 2023 NYC Marathon team to raise awareness and funds for people living with diabetes

As a part of the Beyond Type Run team, runners will be advocating to raise awareness and funds for Beyond Type 1’s portfolio of educational resources, awareness campaigns and peer-to-peer support programs for people impacted by diabetes. This advocacy is elevated through the NYRR Official Charity Partner Program, which offers opportunities for nonprofit organizations to raise funds to support their missions and services.

Dexcom and Tandem Diabetes Care are presenting sponsors of Beyond Type Run for a fourth consecutive year.

The TCS New York City Marathon Official Charity Partner Program has raised more than $440 million for more than 1,000 nonprofit organizations since its establishment in 2006.
https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/team-of-50-individuals-impacted-by-diabetes-prepare-for-the-2023-tcs-new-york-city-marathon-301909163.html
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MNO update
On the podcast next week.. tandem diabetes celebrity panel from friends for life – Hollywood, the NFL and NASCAR. Last week’s episode was Benny off to college

That’s In the News for this week.. if you like it, please share it! Thanks for joining me! See you back here soon.
—-

 

[podcast src=”https://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/27927141/height/90/theme/custom/thumbnail/yes/direction/forward/render-playlist/no/custom-color/3e9ccc/” width=”100%” scrolling=”no” class=”podcast-class” frameborder=”0″ placement=”top” primary_content_url=”http://traffic.libsyn.com/diabetesconnections/Ep_588_Final_Breaking_Limits_documentary.mp3″ libsyn_item_id=”27927141″ height=”90″ theme=”custom” custom_color=”3e9ccc” player_use_thumbnail=”use_thumbnail” use_download_link=”use_download_link” download_link_text=”Download the episode” /]This week, a new project to show an adventurous side of diabetes. a documentary about extreme athletes with type 1. The film makers are interviewing snowboarders, kayakers and professional athletes like Indy Driver Conor Daly and Soccer’s Jordan Morris.

Director Dylan Leonard talks to me about why he wanted to make this movie – he lives with type 1 – how they’re going about it and why he thinks – in an age when we can see people with T1D doing all sort of amazing things – like playing in the NFL or serving on the Supreme Court – this type of film is still needed.

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

Breaking Limits GoFundMe page

There’s another T1D-focused movie fundraising right now as well. Check out “The Cost” here

DOFFLEs (Dads of Friends for Life) info here: https://www.facebook.com/CWDiabetes

Learn more about Moms’ Night Out

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Take Control with Afrezza 

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

Instagram

Twitter

Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

 

 

Ryan Reed, Chad Bower and Mary Mouser show their Tandem tslim x2 pumps

[podcast src=”https://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/27866688/height/90/theme/custom/thumbnail/yes/direction/forward/render-playlist/no/custom-color/3e9ccc/” width=”100%” scrolling=”no” class=”podcast-class” frameborder=”0″ placement=”top” primary_content_url=”http://traffic.libsyn.com/diabetesconnections/Ep_587_Final_Tandem_Panel_FFL.mp3″ libsyn_item_id=”27866688″ height=”90″ theme=”custom” custom_color=”3e9ccc” player_use_thumbnail=”use_thumbnail” use_download_link=”use_download_link” download_link_text=”Download the episode” /]Meet three young adults who are all in the spotlight AND have type 1 diabetes. NFL player Chad Muma, actor Mary Mouser, and professional race car driver Ryan Reed took part in a panel discussion at this summer’s Friends for Life conference. The moderator is CNN correspondent Oren Liebermann, who also lives with T1D.

I attended this panel in person and thought it would be fun to bring to a wider audience.

One of the things you don’t hear is a short film about Chad Muma that was shown at the start of the panel.. it’s a great look at how he kept his dream of playing in the NFL going after his diagnosis. You can watch it here:

https://www.tandemdiabetes.com/resources/community/team-tandem/tandem-ambassadors/chad-muma

Note: Mary Mouser, Chad Muma, and Ryan Reed have compensation agreements with Tandem Diabetes Care. Individual experiences may vary.

RX ONLY. The t:slim X2 insulin pump with Control-IQ technology is indicated for patients with type 1 diabetes, 6 years and older. BOXED WARNING: Control-IQ technology should not be used by people under age 6, or who use less than 10 units of insulin/day, or who weigh less than 55 lbs. For full safety information, visit: https://bit.ly/2OKAQsw

Don’t miss Moms’ Night Out – a new event just for moms of children with diabetes:  https://diabetes-connections.com/events/

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Take Control with Afrezza 

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

Instagram

Twitter

Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

 

 

[podcast src=”https://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/27851130/height/90/theme/custom/thumbnail/yes/direction/forward/render-playlist/no/custom-color/3e9ccc/” width=”100%” scrolling=”no” class=”podcast-class” frameborder=”0″ placement=”top” primary_content_url=”http://traffic.libsyn.com/diabetesconnections/Ep_586_Final_In_the_News.mp3″ libsyn_item_id=”27851130″ height=”90″ theme=”custom” custom_color=”3e9ccc” player_use_thumbnail=”use_thumbnail” use_download_link=”use_download_link” download_link_text=”Download the episode” /]It’s In the News, a look at the top stories and headlines from the diabetes community happening now. Top stories this week: Amazon Pharmacy will automatically apply insulin coupons, a new study shows A1Cs are going down for people with T1D who have access to technology, pollution and gestational diabetes study and a wild study that looks at how a parasite might help prevent type 2.

Don’t miss Moms’ Night Out! 

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Take Control with Afrezza 

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

Instagram

Twitter

Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

Transcript: 

Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I’m Stacey Simms and these are the top diabetes stories and headlines happening now
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In the news is brought to you by Edgepark simplify your diabetes journey with Edgepark
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Amazon’s online pharmacy will automatically apply manufacturer-sponsored coupons to more than 15 insulin and diabetes medicines to help patients access discounts pledged by the drug industry.
With the new program, patients using Amazon Pharmacy will no longer have to search for and manually enter coupons from the three largest insulin makers, Novo Nordisk (NOVOb.CO), Eli Lilly (LLY.N), and Sanofi (SASY.PA), to lower the cost of their insulin to as little as $35 for a month’s supply, the company said.
Novo, Lilly and Sanofi announced in March that they would slash their insulin prices by at least 70% by or in 2024, but many reports some patients were finding it difficult to get already discounted generic insulin from pharmacies at the promised lower price.
Amazon Pharmacy will also automatically apply available discounts to diabetes-related medical devices from manufacturers Dexcom and Insulet, including continuous glucose monitors and pumps, as well as to other cardiometabolic medicines such as Novo’s powerful weight-loss drug Wegovy.
https://www.reuters.com/business/retail-consumer/amazon-pharmacy-automates-discounts-help-insulin-patients-get-pledged-prices-2023-08-15/

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New study will look at Liver Targeted Insulin (LTI) in Type 1 diabetes.. Directing insulin action to the liver may help restore normal liver physiology for people with Type 1 diabetes, leading to better glucose control and overall health outcomes. Jeremy Pettus and a team of researchers are working to determine the mechanism of action and evaluate the safety profile of the Liver Targeted Insulin
Pettus lives with type 1 and is an endocrinologist who is also the xx at TCOYD.
“Living with Type 1 diabetes is extremely tough,” said Pettus. “One of the major barriers to helping patients with Type 1 diabetes achieve normal glucose levels is that injected insulin simply does not get to the ‘right’ places. Normal insulin has its main effects in the liver, but patients with Type 1 diabetes must inject insulin into the fat tissue. Doing so makes the insulin act very slowly, can lead to weight gain and can cause deadly low blood sugars. This project seeks to attach a molecule to insulin that can help direct it to the liver. In doing so, much of the normal physiology may be restored and patients may get better results.”

Pettus is working with the company Diasome to conduct a single center clinical study with 14 patients with Type 1 diabetes to test the safety, tolerability and effectiveness of the novel LTI.

If this study finds that the LTI is active and preferentially targeting the liver, the findings could spur research and development efforts in the LTI space, leading to additional clinical trials and eventually a novel insulin available that could help improve clinical outcomes.
https://today.ucsd.edu/story/2m-grant-drives-research-on-novel-insulin-in-type-1-diabetes
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Good news about A1c reduction in people with type 1.. but it’s limited for those with access to technology.
The new findings from a study involving patients at the Barbara Davis Center for Diabetes Adult Clinic between January 1, 2014, and December 31, 2021. They show that as technology use has increased, A1c levels have dropped in parallel. Moreover, progression from use of stand-alone continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) to automated insulin delivery systems (AIDs), which comprise insulin pumps and connected CGMs, furthered that progress.
On the flip side, A1c levels rose significantly over the study period among nonusers of technology. “We cannot rule out provider bias for not prescribing diabetes technology among those with higher A1c or from disadvantaged socioeconomic backgrounds,” Karakus and colleagues write.

Also of note, even with use of the most advanced AID systems available during the study period, just under half of patients were still not achieving A1c levels below 7%. “The technology helps, but it’s not perfect,” Shah observed.

This study is the first to examine the relationship of A1c with technology use over time, in contrast to prior cross-sectional studies. “The intention here was to look at the landscape over a decade,” Shah said.
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/995738
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Can a parasite help with type 2 diabetes? This is kind of gross but very true.. In the first clinical trial of its kind, a team led by scientists from James Cook University in Australia inoculated volunteers with human hookworm larvae (Necator americanus) to see if these parasites can improve their metabolic health. The two-year study included 24 participants, each of whom showed heightened insulin resistance at the start of the trial.
By the end of the investigation, researchers found those who were infected with hookworms showed a significant reduction in their insulin resistance scores compared to those who were given a placebo.
In recent decades, scientists have noticed that in places where parasitic worms are endemic, people report fewer metabolic and inflammatory diseases. I’m sure I don’t have to say this – but more study is needed. No one is recommending you try to get a parasitic infection
https://www.sciencealert.com/radical-trial-shows-hookworms-may-protect-people-from-type-2-diabetes
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https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/simple-blood-test-may-predict-future-heart-kidney-risk-for-people-with-type-2-diabetes
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Exposure to air pollution early in pregnancy—and even shortly before conception—increases a woman’s risk of developing gestational diabetes, according to a new USC study out in The Lancet Regional Health—Americas.
“Interestingly, we found gestational diabetes risk wasn’t associated with long-term air pollution exposure but was associated with air pollution in a relatively short but critical periconceptional window, from five weeks before to five weeks after conception,” said first author Zhongzheng “Jason” Niu, a postdoctoral fellow in population and public health science at the Keck School of Medicine of USC.
The researchers also found the association between air pollution and gestational diabetes was more pronounced among study participants experiencing prenatal depression.
The mechanism connecting ambient air pollution and gestational diabetes remains unclear, researchers say, but an interplay among impaired glucose metabolism, inflammation and hormonal changes could be to blame. Prenatal depression, with disrupted immune and hormonal functions, could make the case worse.

Exposure to air pollution early in pregnancy increases risk of gestational diabetes, study finds


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Commercial – Edgepark
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A look at Tandem’s bolus by phone feature shows it seems to be helping people with “low bolus frequency” give insulin more. Last year, the t:connect app was updated to allow people with the tslim x2 pump to initiate bolusing from a smart phone or the pump itself. This study looked at those who gave less than three boluses per day prior to the smartphone bolus update – the media number was 2.2. After the smartphone option, that number rose to 2.7.
https://journals.sagepub.com/eprint/QYVHSJUZKND8JJAKRUTG/full
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Great story from Diabetes Daily about two brothers with type 1 who are creating a low or almost no sugar beer. This is in Ireland and I don’t know exactly how to explain it quickly..
“Normally, the reason that the beers have sugar in them – which is what will mess with your blood sugar levels – is that there are unfermentable sugars that remain in the beer, sugars that the yeast isn’t able to convert into alcohol. It’s just a byproduct of how you make it. But this enzyme glucoamylase actually breaks down these unfermentable sugars and makes them into fermentable sugars, so the yeast can convert all of the sugar into alcohol, and there will be no sugar left in the beer at all.
Brut beers are usually done in a clean, bitter, highly fizzy IPA style, almost like a beery champagne, but Seán has tried the glucoamylase in other recipes as well.

“Normally it’s only a pale ale or IPA that people put this enzyme into. But I really like German wheat beers. So I decided I’d try and make a wheat beer with this enzyme as well.”

“It did exactly what it was supposed to do. You end up with no sugar at the end, and a really tasty beer. So I’ve been doing it with a few others – a rye, and a Kolsch, and all the sugars completely ferment out.”

“We’ve had some fun in naming them as well. The first one, the IPA style, we call it Insulin, because it keeps the levels down. The wheat that I like to make we have now called Diawheaties.”

And his non-diabetic friends approve:

“Everyone seems to like it. They tend to be quite nice, easy-drinking beers. We wouldn’t make them just for the zero sugar if they were no good. They’re as good as the normal beers.”

How Two Irish Brothers with Type 1 Diabetes Brew Their Own Zero-Sugar Beer


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MNO update
On the podcast next week.. tandem diabetes celebrity panel from friends for life – Hollywood, the NFL and NASCAR. Last week’s episode was Benny off to college

That’s In the News for this week.. if you like it, please share it! Thanks for joining me! See you back here soon.

 

Benny and Stacey - mother and son - stand together on a college campus in front of a sign that says Patriot Pride

[podcast src=”https://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/27799746/height/90/theme/custom/thumbnail/yes/direction/forward/render-playlist/no/custom-color/3e9ccc/” width=”100%” scrolling=”no” class=”podcast-class” frameborder=”0″ placement=”top” primary_content_url=”http://traffic.libsyn.com/diabetesconnections/Ep_585_Final_Benny_off_to_college.mp3″ libsyn_item_id=”27799746″ height=”90″ theme=”custom” custom_color=”3e9ccc” player_use_thumbnail=”use_thumbnail” use_download_link=”use_download_link” download_link_text=”Download the episode” /]It’s one of the biggest milestones in my family’s experience with diabetes. Our son is off to college! I asked Benny to come on and talk about what’s on his mind, how he’s feeling and to answer your questions, including if he’s going to tell people he has T1D.

We also answer your questions about overnights, how we’ve prepared, our plan for share and follow and much more. I can’t believe this day is here!

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

Our previous episodes with Benny: https://diabetes-connections.com/?s=benny

Don’t miss Moms’ Night Out – our next stops are in Texas, Rhode Island, & North Carolina

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Take Control with Afrezza 

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

Instagram

Twitter

Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com