Let’s talk about driving with diabetes! Getting a driver’s license as a teenager comes with enough challenges without type 1, but letting your child with T1D get behind the wheel is stressful, to say the least! I’m sharing what worked for us and expert advice that may help you and tips to let technology be your friend in the car.

This is an excerpt of Stacey’s book, “Still the World’s Worst Diabetes Mom.” It’s the second book in her series. You can learn more about the books here on Amazon or on our website.

Learn more about Moira McCarthy’s book that Stacey mentions here.

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

Find out more about Moms’ Night Out 

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Learn more about Gvoke Glucagon Gvoke HypoPen® (glucagon injection): Glucagon Injection For Very Low Blood Sugar (gvokeglucagon.com)

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Edgepark Medical Supplies

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

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Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

 

 


This week, addressing something that half of all people with diabetes experience but that there is woefully little information and study about. Why is there so little study about periods and type 1 diabetes? We’re talking to two organizations who are teaming up to change that – but they need your help. We’re talking about Tidepool’s Period Project.

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

You’ll hear from Martina Rothenbühler, project leader data sciences and data protection officer at DCB, and Maya Friedman, founder of The Period Project at Tidepool.

Learn more and sign up for the study here: Menstrual Cycle Study: Identifying changes in insulin sensitivity across the menstrual cycle in T1D – Diabetes Center Berne (dcberne.com)

Find out more about Moms’ Night Out 

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Learn more about Gvoke Glucagon Gvoke HypoPen® (glucagon injection): Glucagon Injection For Very Low Blood Sugar (gvokeglucagon.com)

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Edgepark Medical Supplies

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

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Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

 

 


It’s In the News, a look at the top stories and headlines from the diabetes community happening now. Top stories this week: what is MicroGlucagon and how could it speed up existing rapid-acting insulin? SGLT2 medications may cause false positive alcohol tests, red light therapy for type 2 diabetes, research shows teens with type 2 might have a different kind of diabetes altogether, FDA warns against non-invasive glucose monitoring and more!

Find out more about Moms’ Night Out 

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Learn more about Gvoke Glucagon Gvoke HypoPen® (glucagon injection): Glucagon Injection For Very Low Blood Sugar (gvokeglucagon.com)

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Edgepark Medical Supplies

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

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Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

Episode transcription: 

 

Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I’m Stacey Simms and every other Friday I bring you a short episode with the top diabetes stories and headlines happening now.

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In the news is brought to you by Edgepark simplify your diabetes journey with Edgepark

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Our top story this week…

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New research in Norway.. where a group has applied for a patent for a new solution they call MicroGlucagon. Microamounts of glucagon have been added to regular rapid-acting insulin mixtures.

Trials carried out by the researchers on pigs under general anesthesia show that insulin with added microdoses of glucagon reach full effect up to 10 minutes faster than the fastest insulin currently available. In addition, the amount of insulin absorbed by the body appears to increase when the MicroGlucagon mixture is used, perhaps by as much as 30 per cent.

“The most important thing, however, is that when insulin is absorbed faster, it also disappears from the body faster,” says Carlsen.

 

The researchers believe that their solution may also reduce the risk of low blood sugar for as long as to 3-5 hours after meals.

Glucagon has one very special property that researchers have discovered and exploited. In technical terms, the hormone causes vasodilation. This means that it relaxes the smooth muscles on the inside of the smallest blood vessels. As a result, the blood vessels expand and local blood flow increases greatly.

Although glucagon increases blood sugar levels, the new microdoses will be so minuscule that they will not affect the liver’s release of glucose.

https://www.news-medical.net/news/20240222/Innovative-MicroGlucagon-solution-aims-to-transform-insulin-therapy-for-type-1-diabetics.aspx

 

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New research at the Joslin Diabetes Center sheds new light on the specific changes insulin produce beta cells go through at the onset of T1D. Their findings—published in Nature Cell Biology— suggest the beta cells are initiating events that prompt the autoimmune response. When researches targeted the beta cells they were able to delay progression of type 1 diabetes.

https://www.miragenews.com/pancreatic-cell-changes-at-type-1-diabetes-1181235/

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The diabetes field has long classified the disorder into two distinct groups, type 1 and type 2. However, new genetics research focused on a form of type 2 diabetes that is becoming more common in adolescents suggests a more complicated picture.

This study found that youth-onset type 2 diabetes is a genetically intermediate form of the disorder that lies on a spectrum between adult-onset diabetes and rare forms of the disorder caused by a single gene.

 

The research, published in Nature Metabolism, is based on analysis of DNA from more than 3,000 patients with type 2 diabetes between 12 and 18 years of age and nearly 9,800 adults, more than three-quarters of whom were of African American and Hispanic ancestry.

The work also showed that the specific mix of different types of gene variants an individual carried was linked to their particular set of symptoms. For example, those with more common variants showed more symptoms of adult-onset type 2 diabetes, such as higher insulin levels.

The findings challenge current thinking about type 2 diabetes and suggest a greater genetic overlap between the different forms of diabetes than previously thought.

https://hms.harvard.edu/news/youth-onset-type-2-diabetes-genetically-distinct

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Heads up if you take an SGLT2 inhibitor – it may cause false positive alcohol test results. You might take this medication under the brand name Farxiga, Jardiance or Invokana – there are a few other generic and brand names.

This case, described in a letter in the New England Journal of Medicine, involved a man in his 60s treated for diabetes with an SGLT2 inhibitor for 5 months.

The patient reported to his primary care clinic that he feared being sent to jail because as many as four recent urine toxicology test results taken for the city’s probation office were positive for alcohol, despite his not ingesting alcohol for 10 months. The samples otherwise showed no traces of illicit or nonprescribed substances.

 

A call to the city probation office to inquire about its urine collection protocol revealed that probation office urine samples, sent only once daily to an external lab for testing, were not refrigerated prior to transportation.

When they did further testing, they found there was microbial fermentation of the sugar in the man’s urine.

While there have been several reports of false-positive urine alcohol tests under similar circumstances, such as having chronically elevated sugar levels in the urine, “to my knowledge, this is the first report of this phenomenon with respect to this type of medication,” Schwartz told Medscape Medical News.

 

“Prior studies and cases have shown that it doesn’t take very long for microbial fermentation to occur at room temperature,” Schwartz said.

With the possibility of such cases occurring, Schwartz urges clinicians to “be skeptical of positive urine alcohol tests for patients that have high level of glucose in their urine.”

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/sglt2-inhibitors-cause-false-positive-test-results-2024a10003pu

-glucose-sensor-design-sets-sights-fda-pivotal-trial

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People with type 2 diabetes who underwent bariatric surgery achieved better long-term blood glucose control compared to people who received medical management plus lifestyle interventions, according to a new study supported by the National Institutes of Health. The participants who underwent bariatric surgery, also called metabolic or weight-loss surgery, were also more likely to stop needing diabetes medications and had higher rates of diabetes remission up to 12 years post-surgery.

At seven years, participants in the surgery group experienced an average 20% weight loss compared to 8% in the medical/lifestyle group. The surgery group had greater improvements in blood glucose control, measured by HbA1c, with 54% of participants in the surgery group achieving an HbA1c less than 7% compared to only 27% of participants in the medical/lifestyle group. More participants with surgery achieved diabetes remission compared to participants in the medication/lifestyle group, and the percent of participants using medications to treat diabetes in the surgery group decreased from 98% to 61%, yet remained largely unchanged in the medication/lifestyle group.

 

The results and differences between groups remained significant at 12 years.

https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/bariatric-surgery-provides-long-term-blood-glucose-control-type-2-diabetes-remission

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A new study suggests that red light therapy could help people manage their blood sugar. One catch – the study was done on people without diabetes.

These researchers say they decided to look at red light therapy as a way to help control blood sugar levels after reading a study that sunlight exposure could correlate with improved glucose metabolism.

“Red light is absorbed by mitochondria and helps them produce more energy,” he explained.

scientists found that participants receiving the red light therapy reduced their peak blood sugar level and also reduced their total blood sugar levels during the two hours, compared to those not receiving the light therapy.

Next step, looking at people who actually need this kind of help.

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/red-light-therapy-improves-blood-sugar-levels

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Commercial

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No surprise if you’re a long time listeners, but the Food and Drug Administration warned patients against using smartwatches or smart rings that claim to measure blood sugar without piercing the skin.

Officials published the safety notice Wednesday after learning that people are selling wearables that claim to noninvasively monitor blood glucose. The devices are “manufactured by dozens of companies and sold under multiple brand names,” according to the agency.

The FDA has never authorized a noninvasive wearable that measures or estimates blood glucose values on its own and is concerned inaccurate readings could lead to errors in the management of diabetes.

As well as alerting consumers and physicians to the issue, the FDA is working to ensure “manufacturers, distributors and sellers do not illegally market unauthorized smartwatches or smart rings that claim to measure blood glucose levels,” the agency said.

https://www.medtechdive.com/news/fda-warns-smartwatches-noninvasive-blood-sugar/708320/#:~:text=The%20FDA%20has%20never%20authorized,in%20the%20management%20of%20diabetes.

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Know Labs is ramping up its efforts to change that.

 

The Seattle-based company on Tuesday unveiled the latest iteration of its needle-free glucose monitor device, comprising the version of its internal sensor technology that’ll be included in an eventual submission for FDA clearance.

 

 

The new device—dubbed KnowU—builds on the Generation 1 prototype that Know Labs debuted last summer. In the months since, the company said, it has tested out the glucose-sensing technology under a variety of conditions and miniaturized it to fit in a slimmed-down device.

the new KnowU device can be either placed on the body with an adhesive or strapped onto the wrist or arm for continuous use.

 

The system is designed to last for several years, Steven Kent, Know Labs’ chief product officer, said in a video showing off the KnowU’s features. It’s equipped with a rechargeable battery, with each charge expected to last at least 24 hours.

 

 

The noninvasive device relies on the company’s radiofrequency dielectric sensor technology, which sends radio waves through the skin and collects information about how the RF voltage response travels back to the sensor, and its machine learning algorithms, which analyze the sensor’s findings to continuously measure the amount of glucose in the blood.

https://www.fiercebiotech.com/medtech/know-labs-finalizes-noninvasive

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Join us again soon!

 

 


She calls it the Chaos Lottery – and says we all have different ways of dealing with what life throws our way. I’m talking to Sarah Stewart Holland, host of the huge podcast Pantsuit Politics about her family’s journey with diabetes – her young son was diagnosed almost two years ago. She has a lot to say about parenting a child with a chronic condition – this is not her son’s first serious diagnosis – and also about roles and identity and being a person without type 1 whos’ raising a person with type 1. It’s a lot and it’s great.

This interview was taped at Moms’ Night Out Charlotte. I think it’s a great example of what happens at these events. We moms aren’t looking for perfection, we’re looking for community.

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

Find out more about Moms’ Night Out 

Here’s the episode of Pantsuit Politics with Stacey 

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Learn more about Gvoke Glucagon Gvoke HypoPen® (glucagon injection): Glucagon Injection For Very Low Blood Sugar (gvokeglucagon.com)

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Edgepark Medical Supplies

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

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Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

 

 


We are far away from New Year’s resolutions and it’s feeling a little wintry and dreary around here. Good time to get some motivation and check in with Chris Ruden. Many of you know likely know Chris – who lives with type 1 – from his appearance on the Titan games, his bodybuilding videos or maybe it’s the videos where he shows his prosthetic hand.

Chris has a lot to say about where all of that has brought him and what’s different for him now. He also uses the implantable Eversense CGM – always a lot of questions about that, so I asked him all about it.

More about Chris here

More about Friends for Life here

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

Find out more about Moms’ Night Out 

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Learn more about Gvoke Glucagon Gvoke HypoPen® (glucagon injection): Glucagon Injection For Very Low Blood Sugar (gvokeglucagon.com)

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Edgepark Medical Supplies

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

Instagram

Twitter

Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

Episode summary:

Overcoming labels and finding identity beyond disability.
Chris Ruden shares his journey of overcoming adversity, including living with type one diabetes and bodybuilding, while also revealing his hidden disability of having a prosthetic hand.
Ruden discusses how he has felt limited by people only knowing him for his hardships, despite his diverse range of experiences and accomplishments.
Speaker Chris reflects on his journey with disability and how he’s learned to embrace his identity beyond his physical limitations.
Chris shares how he’s shifted his focus from his disability to his thoughts and feelings, and how he wants to be known for more than just his prosthetic arm.
Diabetes as a part of identity, not defining it.
Stacey Simms shares anecdotal experience of children with type 1 diabetes resisting being defined solely by their condition in middle school.
Chris speaks about how people attach their identities to different aspects of their lives and turn those stories into facts, but feelings are not facts.
Chris speaks about recognizing one’s value beyond diabetes, and how it can create more community in and outside of the diabetes world.
Diabetes management, technology, and lifestyle changes.
Stacey Simms interviews Chris about their diabetes management journey, including past experiences with various pumps, CGMs, and meters, and how they’ve improved their management by focusing on themselves.
Chris focuses on subtraction, not addition, to manage diabetes, with accuracy and flexibility from a long-term CGM implant.
Diabetes management and self-awareness.
Chris discovers personalized insulin management techniques, including micro-bolusing and intentional dosing, to improve blood sugar control.
Chris emphasizes honesty and self-awareness in personal growth and management style.
Diabetes management with a new implantable sensor.
Chris discusses the insertion of an implant for diabetes management, emphasizing its simplicity and minimal invasiveness.
Chris addresses concerns about the surgery, highlighting the quick insertion and removal time, lack of stitches, and the small incision size.
Chris experiences reliable and long-lasting sensor performance with minimal skin irritation
Public speaking, diabetes technology, and managing feelings of inadequacy.
Chris emphasizes the importance of choice in diabetes management, citing small freedoms like wearing clear or colorful clothing as making a big difference in their minute-by-minute condition.
Chris and Stacey Simms reminisce about color forms, a childhood sticker that could be placed and repositioned, and discuss how this concept could be applied to diabetes technology.
Stacey Simms seeks public speaking advice from Chris, who helps people overcome their fear of public speaking by identifying the root cause: the fear of looking dumb to others.
Chris suggests managing this internalized feeling of being “dumb” can make public speaking more accessible and less intimidating.
Chris emphasizes the importance of practicing public speaking and being willing to share knowledge to improve.
He is working on a new book about change, reframing it as an opportunity for improvement rather than a negative thing.

 

It’s In the News, a look at the top stories and headlines from the diabetes community happening now. Top stories this week: Tandem announces it’s taking orders and starting to ship the Mobi pump, Insulet gets European approval for the Abbott Libre integration with Omnipod 5, new study looks at type 2 remission and gastric bypass surgery, one type of medication seems to do a much better job preventing kidney stones in people with type 2, big new grant to look at exercise and type 1 and a look back at diabetes at the Super Bowl.

Find out more about Moms’ Night Out 

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Learn more about Gvoke Glucagon Gvoke HypoPen® (glucagon injection): Glucagon Injection For Very Low Blood Sugar (gvokeglucagon.com)

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Edgepark Medical Supplies

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

Instagram

Twitter

Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

Episode transcript:

Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I’m Stacey Simms and every other Friday I bring you a short episode with the top diabetes stories and headlines happening now.
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In the news is brought to you by Edgepark simplify your diabetes journey with Edgepark
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Our top story this week…
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Tandem diabetes announces the US launch of the Tandem Mobi, the small durable pump – this means they’re taking orders and shipping them out. The Mobi uses The Control-IQ advanced hybrid closed-loop automated insulin delivery feature, cleared for use by people with type 1 diabetes age 6 and up
Infusion Set Options – Compatible with all existing Tandem-branded infusion sets manufactured by Convatec, including a new 5-inch tubing option made just for Tandem Mobi. Infusion sets allow users to temporarily disconnect from their pump for convenience and provide the flexibility of more than 30 mix-and-match infusion site and tubing length combinations.

Tandem Mobi Mobile App – Full iOS mobile control through a user’s compatible iPhone5

Sensor Compatibility – Compatible with the Dexcom G6 Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) System. Additional CGM sensor integrations are planned, including Dexcom G7 in the second quarter of 2024, followed by integration with the Abbott FreeStyle Libre 3 sensor.

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/tandem-diabetes-care-launches-tandem-133000335.html

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Insulet received European approval for integration of the Abbott (NYSE:ABT) FreeStyle Libre 2 Plus with Omnipod 5. Currently, Omnipod 5 works with Dexcom 6 CGM and is working on G7 integration.
Insulet expects availability for the system with Abbott’s CGM to come first in the UK and the Netherlands through a phased launch in the first half of 2024. It then projects other markets in Europe to follow. Dexcom’s technology remains the only approved CGM for use with Insulet pumps in the U.S.

Insulet integrates Abbott FreeStyle Libre 2 Plus, Omnipod 5 in Europe


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Despite diabetes technology, many with type 1 diabetes (T1D) miss glycemic targets and experience severe hypoglycemia and impaired awareness of hypoglycemia (IAH).

METHODOLOGY:
The clinical management of T1D through technology is now recognized as the standard of care, but its real-world impact on glycemic targets and severe hypoglycemic events and IAH is unclear.
Researchers assessed the self-reported prevalence of glycemic metrics, severe hypoglycemia, and hypoglycemia awareness according to the use of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) and automated insulin delivery (AID) systems.
They enrolled 2044 individuals diagnosed with T1D for at least 2 years (mean age, 43.0 years; 72.1% women; 95.4% White) from the T1D Exchange Registry and online communities who filled an online survey.
Most participants (91.7%) used CGM, and 50.8% of CGM users used an AID system.
Despite advanced interventions, only 59.6% (95% CI, 57.3%-61.8%) of CGM users met the glycemic target (A1c < 7%), while nearly 40% of CGM users and 35.6% of AID users didn’t reach the target.
At least one event of severe hypoglycemia in the previous 12 months was reported in 10.8% of CGM users and 16.6% of those using an AID system.
IAH prevalence was seen in 31.1% (95% CI, 29.0%-33.2%) and 30.3% (95% CI, 17.5%-33.3%) of participants using CGM and CGM + AID, respectively.
IN PRACTICE:
“Educational initiatives continue to be important for all individuals with type 1 diabetes, and the development of novel therapeutic options and strategies, including bihormonal AID systems and 𝛽-cell replacement, will be required to enable more of these individuals to meet treatment goals,” the authors wrote.
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/diabetes-tech-falls-short-hypoglycemic-challenges-persist-2024a100032k

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In late January 2024, the medical journal JAMA Internal Medicine published a new study showing that SGLT2 inhibitors could reduce the risk of kidney stone formation in people with type 2 diabetes. The work was a collaboration between Massachusetts area experts in diabetes and nephrology, led by Julie Paik, MD, ScD, MPH. The study examined the insurance records of over one million American adults with type 2 diabetes. They found that those who had begun using an SGLT2 inhibitor were about 30 percent less likely to experience a kidney stone than those who used alternative glucose-lowering medications. The positive effect took hold very quickly — most patients only participated in the study for about six months.

It’s also worth noting that SLGT2 inhibitors outperformed the blockbuster GLP-1 receptor agonist class, which includes the world’s most hyped drug, semaglutide (Ozempic). Although early evidence suggests that semaglutide can also protect kidney health, the JAMA study shows that it is not nearly as effective at preventing kidney stones. GLP-1 users were about 40 percent more likely to receive treatment for a kidney stone.
Sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are pills that help lower blood glucose levels by stopping the kidneys from reabsorbing the sugar in your bloodstream. Extra sugar leaves the body through the urine. They are approved for use in type 2 diabetes, and are also frequently prescribed off-label for people with type 1 diabetes.

There are four SGLT2 inhibitors available today in the United States:

Canagliflozin (Invokana)
Dapagliflozin (Farxiga)
Empagliflozin (Jardiance)
Ertugliflozin (Steglatro)

Diabetes and Kidney Stones? This Drug Could Help


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New research shows that gastric bypass surgery in people with type 2 diabetes results in lasting remission of the disease, even after regaining their weight. The study, from the Mayo Clinic and published in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons, shows that gastric bypass patients were more likely to remain in remission five years later even after weight is regained, compared with those who had undergone sleeve gastrectomy, who were five times more likely to see their diabetes return.
Gastric bypass surgery bypasses a part of the small intestine called the duodenum, while sleeve gastrectomy, which is minimally invasive and a more popular surgery, works by making the stomach smaller thereby restricting the amount of food a person can consume.

Ghanem noted that the duodenum helps regulate what is referred to as the “gut metabolic pathway” and that bypassing it contributes to many physiologic actions or changes in metabolism including the regulation of glycemia.
Among the entire group, 75% of gastric bypass patients had their diabetes remain in remission compared with 34.8% of those who received a sleeve gastrectomy. After adjusting for patient weight-related factors the sleeve gastrectomy group was 5.5 times more likely to have their diabetes return compared with those who underwent gastric bypass surgery.

Gastric Bypass Surgery Results in Lasting Type 2 Diabetes Remission Even after Weight Is Regained


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As Americans age, a skyrocketing number is anticipated to be diagnosed with diabetes in the next few decades.

McKinsey analysts predicted that age-related diseases like diabetes or kidney diseases could soar by 60 percent by 2040 globally. At that time, one in six people worldwide will be over 60.
Jones said this will create a greater need for medical interventions, medications and long-term care, meaning the average American could see far higher health care costs,” Jones said. “Health care resources may need to be reallocated to address the growing burden of chronic diseases. This could affect the availability of health care services for other medical conditions.”

https://www.newsweek.com/age-related-diseases-skyrocketing-next-decades-diabetes-rise-1869550
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Can type 2 diabetes lead to more back problems? New study show type 2 can alters the behavior of disks in the vertebral column, making them stiffer, and also causes the disks to change shape earlier than normal. As a result, the disk’s ability to withstand pressure is compromised. Warning.. this was a study in rats –
“These findings provide novel insight into the potential mechanisms underlying diabetes-related disk tissue damage and may inform the development of preventative and therapeutic strategies for this debilitating condition,” the researchers write.
https://medicalxpress.com/news/2024-02-diabetes-behavior-disks-vertebral-column.html
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Big new grant to help support research aimed at helping people with type 1 more safetly incorporate exercise into their lives. The Helmsley Charitable Trust announced more than $12 million, to building onto the T1D Exercise Initiative (T1-DEXI). It is the largest observational exercise study in people with T1D.
The seven funded projects are:
DiabetesWise for exercise
A team led by Dessi Zaharieva, PhD and Korey Hood, PhD, at Stanford University will work to include education around exercise as an integral part of T1D management into the DiabetesWise platform for people with T1D. DiabetesWise provides unbranded and unbiased information for diabetes technologies, and the expansion to include exercise information will allow people with T1D to have easy access to evidence based information helping them improve their quality of life with exercise.
Educational intervention to support Diabetes Guidance for Exercise (EDGE)
Robin L. Gal, MSPH, CCRA at the Jaeb Center for Health Research in collaboration with Michael C. Riddell, PhD at York University and Michael Rickels, MD, MS, and Jorge Kamimoto, MD at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania will lead a remote study, that will seek to understand if easily accessible, evidence-based education can improve glycemic control for adults with T1D who exercise. Jaeb will develop the modular, multimedia, on-demand education and conduct a clinical study to evaluate its impact. Data from this study will help identify areas of improvement for current T1D exercise guidelines.
Exercise-specific AID algorithm for T1D
Yao Qin, PhD, at the University of California, Santa Barbara will lead a team including collaborators from Stanford University, Tidepool, and University of Trento to conduct a clinical trial to help people with T1D maintain their time in range during and after exercise with Automated Insulin Delivery (AID). Current systems are not designed to manage exercise well, and algorithms need to be adjusted to handle glucose variability that can occur with exercise. This project will design and evaluate an exercise-specific AID algorithm. If successful, it could enhance the FDA-cleared Tidepool Loop algorithm, making it more effective in handling exercise.
Development of a personalized decision support tool using net insulin on board
Rayhan A. Lal, MD. at Stanford University will lead a team including collaborators from CeADAR’s team AI/Machine Learning researchers at University College Dublin under the leadership of Arsalan Shahid, PhD, MBA, and OpenAPS developer Dana Lewis to explore the incorporation of the net insulin-on-board concept and its relationship to exercise management for T1D. The project will also develop a prototype decision support tool to inform pre-exercise decision-making for people with T1D. The prototype will include net insulin on board education and simulations to understand the impact of different types of exercise on glucose outcomes in combination with user behaviors.
Leveraging new ultra-rapid insulins with AID
Robin L. Gal, MSPH, CCRA, at the Jaeb Center for Health Research in collaboration with Dr. Riddell, York University and Dr. Rickels, University of Pennsylvania will lead an in-clinic pilot study that will examine the safety and efficacy of new, ultra-rapid insulins (Affrezza and Lyumjev) for better management of exercise induced glucose levels in adults using AID.
Whey protein to reduce risk of hypoglycemia during exercise with T1D
Dale Morrison, PhD will lead a study at the University of Melbourne to test whether the use of whey protein, as an alternative to carbohydrate ingestion, during or after exercise will reduce the risk of hypoglycemia for people with T1D. The study will provide practical advice and a potentially cost-effective solution for people with T1D engaging in exercise.
Impact of Menstruation on glycemic response and exercise
A team led by Janet Snell-Bergeon, MPH, PhD, at the University of Colorado, Denver will study the impact of menstrual cycles and hormonal birth control on glycemic response and exercise for people with T1D. Additionally, the study will help understand how people can personalize insulin dosing to optimize glucose management during menstrual cycles.
https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20240213270299/en/Helmsley-Charitable-Trust-Awards-Over-12-Million-to-Projects-Aimed-at-Helping-People-With-Type-1-Diabetes-Safely-Incorporate-Exercise-Into-Their-Daily-Lives
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There is growing evidence that ongoing inflammation in the mouth, such as that seen in gum disease, in addition to causing bad breath is associated with serious diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease or type 2 diabetes. Now, researchers report that when people with type 2 diabetes gargled with an antiseptic mouthwash, the numbers of periodontitis-related bacteria decreased. In addition, some patients with reduced bacteria also achieved much better control of their blood sugar, hinting at promising future clinical applications.
Given that poor oral health is linked to serious disease, simple methods to improve oral hygiene have important ramifications. If researchers can identify patients who are likely to respond well to antiseptic mouthwash, this easy-to-use treatment may improve the lives of people with periodontitis-linked diseases such as diabetes, dementia, cardiovascular disease, and respiratory tract infections.

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2024-02-gargling-bad-bacteria-diabetes.html
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JDRF, the leading global type 1 diabetes (T1D) research and advocacy organization, is recognizing Grammy award-winning megastar Usher and NFL Super Bowl Champion Noah Gray of the Kansas City Chiefs for shining a spotlight on T1D during Super Bowl LVIII.

Usher’s now teenage son was diagnosed with T1D at just six years old. As Usher prepared for his highly anticipated Super Bowl Halftime Show and the release of his forthcoming album, he also prioritized raising awareness for T1D and the importance of screening. The music star spoke about his journey as the parent of a child with T1D and the need for greater knowledge and understanding about the disease in numerous media interviews in the run up to Super Bowl LVIII.
https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/jdrf-applauds-usher-and-nfl-star-noah-gray-for-shining-a-spotlight-on-type-1-diabetes-at-super-bowl-lviii-302059838.html

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Join us again soon!


 

This week, we get an update from Dexcom. I’m talking to the Chief Operating Officer about everything from their soon to be launched CGM for people with type 2, that’s called Stelo, to interoperability, connectivity and lots of your questions about G6, G7 and beyond.

 

Find out more about Moms’ Night Out 

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Learn more about Gvoke Glucagon Gvoke HypoPen® (glucagon injection): Glucagon Injection For Very Low Blood Sugar (gvokeglucagon.com)

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Edgepark Medical Supplies

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

Instagram

Twitter

Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

Episode summary (AI generated)

A new CGM product for people with type 2 diabetes.
Stacey Simms and Jake Leach discuss a new CGM product for people with type 2 diabetes, currently under FDA review.
Stello extends sensor wear to 15 days while maintaining accuracy and reliability for CGM users, regardless of insulin titration.
Stello aims to help people with diabetes understand how food impacts their glucose levels through a simple and user-friendly CGM device.

CGM for type 2 diabetes and payer coverage.
Jake Leach explains how the new CGM product will notify users of high glucose levels without alerting them to take insulin, providing valuable insights into food and diet impact on glucose levels.
Stacey Simms seeks more detail on the product and its potential for long-term use, expressing interest in education and training for users to fully understand and benefit from the technology.
Stacey Simms asks Jake Leach about the continuous use of CGMs, and Jake explains that the product is designed to be engaging and provide value continuously, with users learning and improving their diabetes management over time.
Jake also mentions that the company is working with payers to expand coverage for CGMs beyond Medicare, as it can be a challenge for people without insulin use.

CGM access, naming, and interoperability.
Stello is a cache pay product starting off affordable and competitive, with potential for reimbursement as evidence of benefits grows.
Jake Leach: Excited about new brand for Dexcom, with different design for new population, but still with expected performance reliability.
Jake Leach: G6 and G7 interoperability is a focus, with Omni pod integration and launch timing controlled by Dexcom.

G7 features and enhancements.
Jake Leach: Enhancements made to Bluetooth connectivity on G7 device, now available across channels and geographies.
Jake Leach discusses the company’s focus on improving sensor reliability and user satisfaction through ongoing software development and user feedback.
The company prioritizes features based on user feedback and releases them in a timely manner, with a dedicated team working on the Apple Watch feature.

Dexcom’s CGM technology and its potential for more widespread access.
Jake Leach and Stacey Simms discuss the evolution of G7, including its smaller size and reduced environmental footprint.
The company is working on a direct-to-watch submission and has validated alerts and alarms on the watch platform.
Dexcom aims to provide best CGM for users’ pump systems, partnering with multiple companies globally.
Jake Leach is passionate about expanding access to CGM technology for people with diabetes worldwide.

 


This week, legal rights and diabetes have come a long way – but as the technology changes, so have some of the challenges. What happens when a school refuses to use CGM technology? I’m talking to two attorneys this week who have actionable advice and the law on their side. The Dept of Justice has already ruled on this in one state, in a decision that has nationwide impact.

Bonnie Roswig is an attorney with the small non profit Center for Children’s Advocacy which focuses on addressing legal needs of vulnerable children.
Jonathan Chappell lives with type 1 and is a private practice lawyer in Connecticut.

They recently filed an administrative complaint with DOJ in the Eastern district of VA, with more to come. They’ve also created a template for families, on their own to download, complete, and file on their own: Here’s more information for parents

There’s also a Facebook group that is following this issue: https://www.facebook.com/groups/followt1ds

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

Don’t miss our Diabetes Summer Camp Webinar this week!

Find out more about Moms’ Night Out 

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Learn more about Gvoke Glucagon Gvoke HypoPen® (glucagon injection): Glucagon Injection For Very Low Blood Sugar (gvokeglucagon.com)

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Edgepark Medical Supplies

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

Instagram

Twitter

Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

 

 


It’s In the News, a look at the top stories and headlines from the diabetes community happening now. Top stories this week: a look at how weight loss might lower cancer risk in people with type 2, a new study that says BG spikes are good(?!), Modular Medical submits a new insulin pump the FDA, another look at COVID-19’s effects on people with diabetes, a marathoner with type 1 heads to the last trial for this summer’s Olympics, and more!

Find out more about Moms’ Night Out 

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Learn more about Gvoke Glucagon Gvoke HypoPen® (glucagon injection): Glucagon Injection For Very Low Blood Sugar (gvokeglucagon.com)

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Edgepark Medical Supplies

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

Instagram

Twitter

Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

 

Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I’m Stacey Simms and every other Friday I bring you a short episode with the top diabetes stories and headlines happening now.

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In the news is brought to you by Edgepark simplify your diabetes journey with Edgepark

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Our top story this week…

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A weight loss intervention in people with type 2 diabetes was found to alter levels of cancer-related proteins. The study, published in eBioMedicine, is the first to show that weight loss in people recently diagnosed with diabetes can change the levels of cancer-related chemicals circulating in the blood.

Previous studies have found that having increased body weight alters the levels of circulating proteins with a known link to cancer. Motivated by these findings, researchers from Bristol Medical School collaborated with colleagues from the universities of Glasgow and Newcastle who led the DiRECT trial. They sought to evaluate whether the benefits of weight loss in people with type 2 diabetes also impacts their risk of developing cancer.

Nine cancer-related proteins in blood samples were found to be changed by the weight loss intervention compared with the control group who had received standard care for diabetes treatment.

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2024-01-weight-loss-intervention-people-diabetes.html

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While a lot is being studied about the factors that trigger the onset of chronic diseases like diabetes and cholesterol, a new study has shed light on an uncommon risk factor. A study done by researchers at the Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute has found that the milestones in a female’s reproductive years could be the risk factors for metabolic dysfunction.

This was published in Cell Metabolism.

These reproductive risk factors include early age of first menstruation, menstrual irregularity, the development of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), high weight change in pregnancy, abnormal blood sugar and lipid levels during pregnancy and the severity and timing of menopausal symptoms.

https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/life-style/health-fitness/health-news/age-of-first-menstruation-among-risk-factors-for-diabetes-cholesterol-in-females-finds-study/articleshow/107249372.cms?from=mdr

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Dexcom has submitted its new CGM to the FDA – this is intended for people with diabetes who do not require insulin. Called Stelo, it will last for 15 days and it won’t have the same alarms as the previous Dexcom models. Pricing said to be in line with the Abbott Free Style Libre systems.

https://www.drugtopics.com/view/dexcom-submits-new-cgm-for-non-insulin-type-2-diabetes-for-fda-clearance

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This study is one to watch.. researchers at Sinai Health have discovered important insights into the link between post-meal insulin levels and long-term cardiac and metabolic well-being. This study challenges the prevailing belief that an insulin spike after eating is a bad thing.

These doctors say it could be an indicator of good health to come.

The team reported their findings in the online journal eClinicalMedicine, published by the Lancet group.

These researchers say In the long run, higher corrected insulin response levels were linked with better beta-cell function and lower glucose levels.

Overturning Old Myths: New Research Indicates That Insulin Spike After Eating Is Actually a Good Thing

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For people with diabetes, disruption from the COVID-19 pandemic led to higher rates of death and other adverse outcomes, particularly diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in children, new research found.

 

The data came from what was believed to be the first systematic review of evidence related to the clinical impact of the disruptions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and delays in seeking care among people with diabetes, rather than illness from the virus itself. The review was commissioned by the World Health Organization (WHO) and included a total of 138 studies.

While there were no differences in overall amputations or DKA in adults, there were significantly higher rates of DKA hospitalizations in children and adolescents, both with new-onset and preexisting type 1 diabetes.

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/pandemic-disruption-adversely-affected-people-diabetes-2024a10001wt

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Disordered eating BBC

https://www.bbc.com/news/health-68057324

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A new insulin pump is before the FDA – this is from San Diego-based Modular Medical. It’s let by Paul DiPerna who founded Tandem Diabetes Care.  A news release says:

Modular Medical designed the 90-day MODD1 with new microfluidics technology to allow for the low-cost pumping of insulin. Its new intuitive design makes the product simple to use and easier to prescribe.

 

The pump has a reservoir size of 300 units/3mL. Users can monitor the pump activity with their cell phone and do not require an external controller. The pump uses a provided, single-use, disposable battery.

Modular Medical submits next-gen insulin pump for FDA clearance

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Dexcom CIQ | Garmin

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Commercial

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A new CGM from Roche? What do we know?

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The last qualifier for the Women’ Marathon at the Summer Olympics is this weekend and there’s a runner with type 1 hoping to make the cut. Sofie Schunk

Was diagnosed with type 1 while in college, where she played soccer and track and field. The Albuquerque native has passed two qualifying Olympic trials for the marathon. In both runs, she set personal records.

The top three runners, as well as three alternatives, will represent Team USA in Paris.

The qualifying race is set for Saturday, Feb. 3. in Orlando.

The 2024 Summer Games in Paris begins Friday, July 26.

 

https://www.runnersworld.com/runners-stories/a46552797/sofie-schunk-diabetes-olympic-marathon-trials/

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Join us again soon!


Let’s talk about diabetes camp! It’s probably still cold where you live, but now is the time to start planning. Your local camp may open for registration in the next couple of weeks.

My guest is the Dr. Gregory Fox, medical director of Camp Surefire in Rhode Island. He’s going to answer many common questions about sending your child away.. and he’ll talk about Camp Views – this is a system that lets staff monitor every single kid’s CGM in one place at all times.

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

Find out more about Moms’ Night Out 

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Learn more about Gvoke Glucagon Gvoke HypoPen® (glucagon injection): Glucagon Injection For Very Low Blood Sugar (gvokeglucagon.com)

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Edgepark Medical Supplies

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

Instagram

Twitter

Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

 

 

[podcast src=”https://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/29599923/height/180/theme/custom/thumbnail/no/direction/forward/render-playlist/no/custom-color/3e9ccc/” width=”100%” scrolling=”no” class=”podcast-class” frameborder=”0″ placement=”top” primary_content_url=”http://traffic.libsyn.com/diabetesconnections/DC1_Ep_619_Final_Rebel_Health_Fox.mp3″ libsyn_item_id=”29599923″ height=”180″ theme=”custom” custom_color=”3e9ccc” player_use_thumbnail=”” use_download_link=”use_download_link” download_link_text=”Download” /]Have you heard about the rebel alliance of healthcare?  That’s what my guest calls the patient-led movement to improve health & health care. Susannah Fox served as the Chief Technology Officer for the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services and she’s got a new book out called Rebel Health. If you’re thinking hey – that’s sounds like a lot of the diabetes community – oh yeah. You’re right and we talk about it.

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

Learn more about “Rebel Health” and order the book here: Rebel Health (mit.edu)

Find out more about Moms’ Night Out 

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Learn more about Gvoke Glucagon Gvoke HypoPen® (glucagon injection): Glucagon Injection For Very Low Blood Sugar (gvokeglucagon.com)

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Edgepark Medical Supplies

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

Instagram

Twitter

Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

 

 

[podcast src=”https://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/29552108/height/180/theme/custom/thumbnail/no/direction/forward/render-playlist/no/custom-color/3e9ccc/” width=”100%” scrolling=”no” class=”podcast-class” frameborder=”0″ placement=”top” primary_content_url=”http://traffic.libsyn.com/diabetesconnections/DC1_Ep_618_Final_In_the_News.mp3″ libsyn_item_id=”29552108″ height=”180″ theme=”custom” custom_color=”3e9ccc” player_use_thumbnail=”” use_download_link=”use_download_link” download_link_text=”Download” /]It’s In the News, a look at the top stories and headlines from the diabetes community happening now. Top stories this week: Vertex pauses their stem cell transplantation trials after a patient death, spray insulin is tested, learning more about Dexcom’s sensor for type 2, measuring A1C through menstrual blood and more!

Find out more about Moms’ Night Out 

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Learn more about Gvoke Glucagon Gvoke HypoPen® (glucagon injection): Glucagon Injection For Very Low Blood Sugar (gvokeglucagon.com)

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Edgepark Medical Supplies

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

Instagram

Twitter

Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

Episode transcript:

Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I’m Stacey Simms and every other Friday I bring you a short episode with the top diabetes stories and headlines happening now.

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In the news is brought to you by Edgepark simplify your diabetes journey with Edgepark

XX

Our top story this week…

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Vertex Pharmaceuticals, Inc. has paused a study of stem cell–derived, fully pancreatic islet cell replacement therapy (VX-880) following two patient deaths.

Neither death is related to the therapy itself – called VX-880 – according to the company. Vertex says they plan to share full data soon. In the study that was paused, 14 patients with type 1 received infusions of VX-880 and standard immunosuppression. After 90 days, 13 of the patients have an A1C under 7 without using exogenous insulin.

This was the study that made a big splash in the New York Times in late 2021 with the headline “A Cure for Type 1 Diabetes?” and featuring Brian Shelton among others. Shelton is one of the two patients who have died.

 

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/vertex-pauses-islet-cell-study-after-patient-deaths-2024a10000oe

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Early days but researchers in Norway are testing an insulin body spray.

Patients squirt the insulin directly on to their inner forearm, where skin tends to be thinner, allowing easier absorption. Within minutes, it gets absorbed into the bloodstream.

This joins other research on skin patches packed with micro-needles that punch tiny and reportedly painless holes in the skin to let insulin seep through.

The spray contains insulin and propylene carbonate, a chemical often used in cosmetic skin creams to help them penetrate the outer layers of the skin.

In this case, it’s hoped the chemical — attached to insulin in the spray droplets — will help the hormone seep as far as the tiny blood vessels that lie beneath the surface of the skin, where the hormone will then get absorbed into the bloodstream.

 

InsuLife, the Norwegian company developing the body spray, is setting up a trial involving 12 patients with type 1 diabetes to see how different doses of the spray compare with injected insulin in controlling blood-sugar levels. It is used just before a meal, like injected insulin.

 

The clinical trial was set up after a study involving five people found the spray reduced blood sugar levels by about 20 per cent after a meal.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-12965203/insulin-spray-arm-diabetes-jab-Hope-sight-millions.html

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The FDA clears the Qvin’s Q-Pad™ A1c Test System which uses menstrual blood to get an A1C result.

The kit is intended for the collection of menstrual blood samples by individuals 18 years of age and older using the Q-Pad, a pad with an embedded blood collection strip (Q-Strip). Each kit includes 2 Q-Pads, a return sample container, and a stamped mailing pouch.

The FDA clearance was based on data from a clinical validation study that included 198 participants. Samples were collected using the Q-Pad Kit and were returned to the laboratory by mail. To provide the reference sample, a venous blood draw was performed on participants by a phlebotomist. An analysis of both samples demonstrated that the clinical performance of the Q-Pad test system in measuring HBA1c was equivalent to the traditional method of blood testing.

FDA-Approved Q-Pad Test System Uses Menstrual Blood to Measure HbA1c

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Learning more about Dexcom’s upcoming CGM designed for people with type 2 who don’t use insulin. It’s to be called Stelo and they’ve submitted to the FDA with an eye on a late summer launch. I was at the announced last June – this is a system that will have very few alerts and alarms.. Stelo looks a lot like the G7 but will have different software and will last for about 15 days per sensor.

https://www.theverge.com/2024/1/11/24034098/dexcom-stelo-cgm-diabetes-health-tech-ces-2024

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Tandem Diabetes Care’s t:slim X2 Insulin Pump Automated Insulin Delivery System is now the first to incorporate the Abbott FreeStyle Libre 2 Plus Sensor for users in the United States. The FreeStyle Libre 2 Plus sensor is a modified version of the FreeStyle Libre 2 sensor cleared in 2023 by the US Food & Drug Administration for use with automated insulin delivery (AID) systems.

The move follows Tandem’s December announcement of integration with the recently available 10-day Dexcom G7 sensor.

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/tandem-insulin-pump-system-integrates-libre-sensor-2024a10000iq?form=fpf

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If you use Omnipod 5 with an Android, there’s a software update you need to do. The FDA has issued a Class one correction recall. due to a software error that occurs when the user enters a bolus amount less than 1 unit without putting a leading zero before the decimal point.

This recall is not a product removal and users should have already received an alert that won’t let them use the app until they do the software update.

https://www.fda.gov/medical-devices/medical-device-recalls/insulet-corporation-recalls-omnipod-5-android-app-due-software-error#:~:text=Reason%20for%20Recall,zero%20before%20the%20decimal%20point.

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Embecta continues to move ahead with its insulin patch pump.. submitting a 510(k) premarket filing to the FDA for its proprietary insulin patch pump.

This is a disposable pump for people with type 2 diabetes. It also has a closed-loop version under development to follow. That version features an embedded algorithm that requires Embecta to run a clinical study.

Henry Anhalt, chief medical officer, says nine out of 10 people with diabetes live with type 2 diabetes. However, Anhalt says the majority of automated insulin delivery systems cater to those with type 1 diabetes. Embecta aims to offer more options and tools to the broader diabetes care community, he says.

 

Embecta submits insulin patch pump for FDA clearance

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Update on insulin prices.. as a few prices changes went into affect at the beginning of the year. So, what took effect this month was that Sanofi followed suit with Eli Lilly and Novo Nordisk to implement this cap on insulin co-pays at $35 that took effect January 1.

And that comes after the provisions of the Inflation Reduction Act capped insulin for people on Medicare at $35. The Medicare cap is automatic and part of policy. For everyone with commercial insurance, the cap is voluntary from the companies. For those without government or private insurance, the picture is more complicated. If your insulin is still more than $35 per month, ask your pharmacist for coupons or check out getinsulin dot org.

https://www.pbs.org/newshour/show/new-law-caps-insulin-prices-for-some-with-diabetes-but-cost-remains-high-for-millions

 

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Commercial

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Young adults who reported higher stress during their teenage years to adulthood were more likely to have high blood pressure, obesity and other cardiometabolic risk factors than their peers who reported less stress, according to new research published today in the Journal of the American Heart Association, an open access, peer-reviewed journal of the American Heart Association.

Cardiometabolic risk factors often occur together and are a significant cause of cardiovascular disease. These include obesity, Type 2 diabetes or prediabetes, high cholesterol and high blood pressure, researchers noted.

In 2020, cardiometabolic diseases, including cardiovascular diseases and Type 2 diabetes, were the most prevalent chronic health conditions and collectively accounted for nearly a quarter of all deaths in the U.S., according to the American Heart Association statistics. In 2023, the American Heart Association noted the strong connections among cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, Type 2 diabetes and obesity, and suggested redefining cardiovascular risk, prevention and management.

 

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/childhood-stress-linked-higher-risk-100000670.html

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Shout out to NBC News for a great story they did recently on LADA – featuring two women who have both been on this podcast. Dr. Phyllisa DeRoze and Mila Clark were both first misdiagnosed with type 2 before they got a correct diagnosis of LADA. I’ll link up the NBC story along with our chats with both women.. thanks to Mila for giving me a mention as one of the voices in the diabetes community who made her think was she had might not be type 2.. but could be LADA.

https://www.nbcnews.com/health/diabetes/diagnosed-type-2-diabetes-may-different-form-disease-rcna132571

 

 

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Join us again soon!

[podcast src=”https://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/29497903/height/180/theme/custom/thumbnail/no/direction/forward/render-playlist/no/custom-color/3e9ccc/” width=”100%” scrolling=”no” class=”podcast-class” frameborder=”0″ placement=”top” primary_content_url=”http://traffic.libsyn.com/diabetesconnections/DC1_Ep_617_Final_Molly_Glucose_Vital_Sign.mp3″ libsyn_item_id=”29497903″ height=”180″ theme=”custom” custom_color=”3e9ccc” player_use_thumbnail=”” use_download_link=”use_download_link” download_link_text=”Download” /]Why isn’t blood glucose considered as, and monitored as, a vital sign? That’s the question this week’s guest is asking. Molly McElwee Malloy has big plans to change how hospitals and doctors are able to keep track of glucose.

You may recognize Molly. She’s worked at Tandem Diabetes and kept us posted over the years about Control IQ and other advances there. She’s got a new job and this big new goal. As always with Molly, who lives with type 1, it’s a great conversation.

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

our past episodes with Molly: https://diabetes-connections.com/?s=mcelwee

Find out more about Moms’ Night Out 

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Learn more about Gvoke Glucagon Gvoke HypoPen® (glucagon injection): Glucagon Injection For Very Low Blood Sugar (gvokeglucagon.com)

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Edgepark Medical Supplies

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

Instagram

Twitter

Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

 

 

[podcast src=”https://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/29275233/height/180/theme/custom/thumbnail/no/direction/forward/render-playlist/no/custom-color/3e9ccc/” width=”100%” scrolling=”no” class=”podcast-class” frameborder=”0″ placement=”top” primary_content_url=”http://traffic.libsyn.com/diabetesconnections/DC1_Ep_616_Final_Sernova_Pussinen.mp3″ libsyn_item_id=”29275233″ height=”180″ theme=”custom” custom_color=”3e9ccc” player_use_thumbnail=”” use_download_link=”use_download_link” download_link_text=”Download” /]Sernova is making progress developing a cell pouch system they hope will be a functional cure for type 1 diabetes. This week, we’re talking to Sernova’s CEO Cynthia Pussinen for an update on their latest research, clinical trials and she answers your questions about everything from immunosuppressive drugs, how long people in these trials stay off insulin, and how to get into their trials.

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

Find out more about Moms’ Night Out 

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Learn more about Gvoke Glucagon Gvoke HypoPen® (glucagon injection): Glucagon Injection For Very Low Blood Sugar (gvokeglucagon.com)

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Edgepark Medical Supplies

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

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Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

 

 

[podcast src=”https://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/29230428/height/180/theme/custom/thumbnail/no/direction/forward/render-playlist/no/custom-color/3e9ccc/” width=”100%” scrolling=”no” class=”podcast-class” frameborder=”0″ placement=”top” primary_content_url=”http://traffic.libsyn.com/diabetesconnections/DC1_Ep_615_Final_2024_Predictions_Scheiner.mp3″ libsyn_item_id=”29230428″ height=”180″ theme=”custom” custom_color=”3e9ccc” player_use_thumbnail=”” use_download_link=”use_download_link” download_link_text=”Download” /]Happy New Year! It’s our first episode of 2024 so let’s talk about what this year could bring. I’m doing some predictions with the wonderful Gary Scheiner, MS, CDCES.

Gary is the founder of Integrated Diabetes Services and has been named Educator of the Year by the ADA. He’s the author of Think Like a Pancreas and has launched a podcast with the same name.

We’ll take a quick look back at 2023, find out what he’s most looking forward to in 2024 and what else we might expect in the months to come.

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

2023 prediction episode here

2022 prediction episode here

Find out more about Moms’ Night Out 

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Learn more about Gvoke Glucagon Gvoke HypoPen® (glucagon injection): Glucagon Injection For Very Low Blood Sugar (gvokeglucagon.com)

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Edgepark Medical Supplies

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

Instagram

Twitter

Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com