This week, talking with one of the lawyers bringing a class-action lawsuit against the insulin companies.. a lawsuit that has been inching forward since 2017. It was set to be settled for 500-million dollars and a four year price cap, but then judge said no.  Attorney Steve Berman will talk about that last minute surprise, why he’s still going forward, and  what he needs now from the diabetes community.

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

My guest is Attorney Steven Berman from the firm Hagens (Haagens like Haagen Daas) Berman. Steve co-founded Hagens Berman in 1993 after his prior firm refused a fast food e coli case. That turned out to be the famous case against Jack in the Box, which resulted in a class action settlement and changed many food safety laws. He’s also been involved in cases against Big Tobacco and, as you’ll hear, other medical pricing lawsuits.  

Learn more about the case and fill out the form to see if you’re entitled to compensation here: https://www.hbsslaw.com/cases/insulin-overpricing#block-form-block-destination

Find out more about Moms’ Night Out – registration is open for Denver!

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Learn more about Gvoke Glucagon Gvoke HypoPen® (glucagon injection): Glucagon Injection For Very Low Blood Sugar (gvokeglucagon.com)

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Edgepark Medical Supplies

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

Instagram

Twitter

Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

Check out this episode!

It’s In the News! A look at the top diabetes stories and headlines happening now. Top stories this week: more older adults are being diagnosed with type 1 and people with T1D are living longer, Eversense gets iCGM designation, new drug to prevent low BG is being tested, Tandem diabetes app recall, and more!

Find out more about Moms’ Night Out 

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Learn more about Gvoke Glucagon Gvoke HypoPen® (glucagon injection): Glucagon Injection For Very Low Blood Sugar (gvokeglucagon.com)

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Edgepark Medical Supplies

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

Instagram

Twitter

Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

Episode transcription with links:

Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I’m Stacey Simms and every other Friday I bring you a short episode with the top diabetes stories and headlines happening now.

XX

In the news is brought to you by Edgepark simplify your diabetes journey with Edgepark

XX

Type 1 diabetes is increasingly affecting older adults in the US, with prevalence rates peaking in those aged 45 to 64, according to recent research published in JAMA.1

The life expectancy for people with T1D has increased over the last 15 years, which has led to increased prevalence among older adults.2 The CDC currently estimates that approximately 1.8 million people in the US have T1D.3

The study utilized data from the 2019 to 2022 cycles of the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), representative of the noninstitutionalized US population. The study included over 141,000 participants (110,283 adults and 30,708 youths).

The increasing prevalence of T1D in older adults suggests that further research is needed to develop treatment guidelines that include strategies to optimize treatment in older adults living with T1D. Current clinical practices often extrapolate from data on younger populations or those with type 2 diabetes, which may not be entirely appropriate for older adults with specific needs in terms of cardiovascular and glycemic management.

 

https://www.ajmc.com/view/t1d-prevalence-rising-among-us-adults-study-finds

XX

Pancreatic cancer research may have implications for diabetes. These reserachres were looking at an enzyme called focal adhesion kinase (FAK). During the trials, quote – “The pancreas looked weird, almost like it was trying to regenerate after an injury,” Even weirder, a cluster of cells in the pancreas were expressing both insulin and amylase. In normal mice and humans, the blood sugar-regulating hormone insulin is produced by beta cells, while amylase, a digestive enzyme, is manufactured by different cells. The functions of acinar and beta-cells are very distinct, so it didn’t make sense that the cluster of cells looked like a combination of the two.

Esni and his team had in fact stumbled upon this holy grail. In a new Nature Communications paper, the researchers show that a FAK-inhibiting drug, which has been studied in cancer treatment, converted acinar cells into acinar-derived insulin-producing (ADIP) cells and helped regulate blood glucose in diabetic mice and a single non-human primate.

The findings suggest that FAK inhibitors could be a new avenue as a replacement for insulin therapy in diabetic patients.

With the eventual hope of launching a clinical trial to test FAK inhibitor in diabetes patients, Esni and his team are now planning long-term experiments in mice to look at the duration of hyperglycemia control after a single course of the drug in mouse models for type 1 or type 2 diabetes. They’re also investigating the effects of FAK inhibition in pancreatic tissues from human donors.

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2024-05-repurposed-cancer-drug-diabetes-nudging.html

XX

A report published today by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) and T1International shows astonishing markups by pharmaceutical corporations on insulin injection pens and newer diabetes medicines.

Currently, only half of all the people in the world who need insulin have access to it.

Doctors without borders  is among the few humanitarian groups currently procuring insulin pens.

Based on MSF’s research of the cost of production, long-acting insulin pens, which are the standard of care in high-income countries, could be sold at profit for as low as $111 per patient per year, which includes insulin and the device needed to inject it. This is 30 percent less than human insulin in a vial with syringes, which have always been thought to be the most affordable option

 

The US must do more to ensure equitable access to diabetes drugs worldwide

“While the announcement of a recent US Senate investigation into Novo Nordisk’s GLP-1 drug prices is an important step, the US government must do more to ensure equitable access to diabetes drugs worldwide,”

https://www.doctorswithoutborders.org/latest/diabetes-only-half-people-who-need-insulin-world-have-access-it

XX

The U.S. FDA on Wednesday warned about a software glitch found in the Tandem Diabetes’ t:slim X2 insulin pump, classifying the issue as a Class I recall, the agency’s most serious type of recall. HOWEVER.. this happened in March and Tandem says it’s been resolved. Here’s what happened..

 

The error was found in the Apple iOS-based software version of the t:connect mobile app used for the t:slim X2 insulin pump with Control-IQ technology.

The defect causes the app to crash down and relaunch repeatedly, leading to excessive Bluetooth communication, which in turn drains the pump battery and leads to an unexpected pump shutdown.

More than 85K t:slim X2 insulin pumps distributed in the U.S. between February 12 and March 13 have been affected by the issue, which the FDA has categorized as a correction.

Tandem Diabetes (TNDM) sent a letter to affected customers in March requesting them to update the app.

After a discussion with the management, Citi said that 98% of users have updated their apps to version 2.7.1, released on March 13. The company has not seen any issues with the latest app version and expects the update to permanently fix the defect. Citi retains its Neutral rating on the stock.

XX

HIGH POINT, N.C., March 04, 2024 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — vTv Therapeutics Inc. (Nasdaq: VTVT), a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the development of cadisegliatin (TTP399) as an adjunctive therapy to insulin for the treatment of type 1 diabetes (“T1D”), today announced the submission of the study protocol to the FDA for the Company’s first Phase 3 trial evaluating the safety and efficacy of its lead candidate, cadisegliatin, in adults diagnosed with T1D.

The Phase 3 study will assess two doses of orally administered cadisegliatin versus placebo in patients currently being treated with multiple daily insulin injections and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, who use a continuous glucose monitor (CGM). The primary efficacy endpoint of the study will compare the incidence of Level 2 or Level 3 hypoglycemic events between cadisegliatin-treated subjects and those in the placebo group.

It received a breakthrough therapy designation (BTD) based on its Phase II trial (NCT03335371), which showed a 40% decrease in the frequency of severe and symptomatic hypoglycaemic events along with a decrease in serum and urine ketone events in the treatment group.

Cadisegliatin is not yet licensed or approved anywhere globally and has not been demonstrated to be safe or effective for any use. Cadisegliatin (TTP399) is an investigational liver-selective glucokinase activator that has been studied in healthy volunteers and in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

XX

Timing is everything.. the same day we released our episode about the Eversense CGM last week, Senseonics, in collaboration with Ascensia Diabetes Care, has announced that its Eversense product received an integrated continuous glucose monitoring (iCGM) designation from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

This marks Eversense as the first fully implantable device to achieve such status, paving the way for future devices of its kind through the FDA’s De Novo pathway.

The iCGM designation signifies that the system can be integrated with compatible medical devices, such as insulin pumps, to create an automated insulin delivery (AID) system.

https://www.medicaldevice-network.com/news/senseonics-eversense-icgm-designation-fda/

XX

Commercial

XX

 

 

XX

A big win for Georgians with Medicaid who have #diabetes. Governor Brian Kemp signed into law a bill that expands #CGM access to persons with Medicaid and diabetes who are insulin therapy and removes the age limitation and endocrinology requirement. Please see ADA press release below. Please share.

https://lnkd.in/g_WVTNpi American Diabetes Association

 

XX

61-year-old ultrarunner Linda Carrier is the first woman to complete the World Marathon Challenge (seven marathons on seven continents in seven days) three times.

 

Plus, she has run 78 marathons and 55 half-marathons and is currently in the process of running a marathon in all 50 states with just 12 to go.

 

To add to the wow factor, Carrier has accomplished it all while managing type 1 diabetes for nearly 50 years.

 

“I naturally like to challenge myself, and when someone says [you have] a life-shortening disease, I’m like, heck it’s not. I’m going to show them that I’ll be the longest-living type 1 diabetic,” Carrier told Healthline.

 

She was 14 years old when she learned she had the condition. Because her older sister had been diagnosed a few years before, Carrier was familiar with the symptoms. She also knew the outlook was daunting.

She will finish her latest goal of running a marathon in all 50 states next October in Twin Cities, Minnesota. The race will be sponsored by Medtronic.

 

“Seems like the perfect way to finish,” Carrier said. “And to show that type 1 diabetes should not stop you from reaching any of your goals, whatever it might be.”

https://www.healthline.com/health-news/linda-carrier-diabetes-marathon

XX

Join us again soon!

Check out this episode!

It’s In the News! A look at the top diabetes stories and headlines happening now. Top stories this week: more older adults are being diagnosed with type 1 and people with T1D are living longer, Eversense gets iCGM designation, new drug to prevent low BG is being tested, Tandem diabetes app recall, and more!

Find out more about Moms’ Night Out 

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Learn more about Gvoke Glucagon Gvoke HypoPen® (glucagon injection): Glucagon Injection For Very Low Blood Sugar (gvokeglucagon.com)

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Edgepark Medical Supplies

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

Instagram

Twitter

Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

Episode transcription with links:

Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I’m Stacey Simms and every other Friday I bring you a short episode with the top diabetes stories and headlines happening now.

XX

In the news is brought to you by Edgepark simplify your diabetes journey with Edgepark

XX

Type 1 diabetes is increasingly affecting older adults in the US, with prevalence rates peaking in those aged 45 to 64, according to recent research published in JAMA.1

The life expectancy for people with T1D has increased over the last 15 years, which has led to increased prevalence among older adults.2 The CDC currently estimates that approximately 1.8 million people in the US have T1D.3

The study utilized data from the 2019 to 2022 cycles of the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), representative of the noninstitutionalized US population. The study included over 141,000 participants (110,283 adults and 30,708 youths).

The increasing prevalence of T1D in older adults suggests that further research is needed to develop treatment guidelines that include strategies to optimize treatment in older adults living with T1D. Current clinical practices often extrapolate from data on younger populations or those with type 2 diabetes, which may not be entirely appropriate for older adults with specific needs in terms of cardiovascular and glycemic management.

 

https://www.ajmc.com/view/t1d-prevalence-rising-among-us-adults-study-finds

XX

Pancreatic cancer research may have implications for diabetes. These reserachres were looking at an enzyme called focal adhesion kinase (FAK). During the trials, quote – “The pancreas looked weird, almost like it was trying to regenerate after an injury,” Even weirder, a cluster of cells in the pancreas were expressing both insulin and amylase. In normal mice and humans, the blood sugar-regulating hormone insulin is produced by beta cells, while amylase, a digestive enzyme, is manufactured by different cells. The functions of acinar and beta-cells are very distinct, so it didn’t make sense that the cluster of cells looked like a combination of the two.

Esni and his team had in fact stumbled upon this holy grail. In a new Nature Communications paper, the researchers show that a FAK-inhibiting drug, which has been studied in cancer treatment, converted acinar cells into acinar-derived insulin-producing (ADIP) cells and helped regulate blood glucose in diabetic mice and a single non-human primate.

The findings suggest that FAK inhibitors could be a new avenue as a replacement for insulin therapy in diabetic patients.

With the eventual hope of launching a clinical trial to test FAK inhibitor in diabetes patients, Esni and his team are now planning long-term experiments in mice to look at the duration of hyperglycemia control after a single course of the drug in mouse models for type 1 or type 2 diabetes. They’re also investigating the effects of FAK inhibition in pancreatic tissues from human donors.

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2024-05-repurposed-cancer-drug-diabetes-nudging.html

XX

A report published today by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) and T1International shows astonishing markups by pharmaceutical corporations on insulin injection pens and newer diabetes medicines.

Currently, only half of all the people in the world who need insulin have access to it.

Doctors without borders  is among the few humanitarian groups currently procuring insulin pens.

Based on MSF’s research of the cost of production, long-acting insulin pens, which are the standard of care in high-income countries, could be sold at profit for as low as $111 per patient per year, which includes insulin and the device needed to inject it. This is 30 percent less than human insulin in a vial with syringes, which have always been thought to be the most affordable option

 

The US must do more to ensure equitable access to diabetes drugs worldwide

“While the announcement of a recent US Senate investigation into Novo Nordisk’s GLP-1 drug prices is an important step, the US government must do more to ensure equitable access to diabetes drugs worldwide,”

https://www.doctorswithoutborders.org/latest/diabetes-only-half-people-who-need-insulin-world-have-access-it

XX

The U.S. FDA on Wednesday warned about a software glitch found in the Tandem Diabetes’ t:slim X2 insulin pump, classifying the issue as a Class I recall, the agency’s most serious type of recall. HOWEVER.. this happened in March and Tandem says it’s been resolved. Here’s what happened..

 

The error was found in the Apple iOS-based software version of the t:connect mobile app used for the t:slim X2 insulin pump with Control-IQ technology.

The defect causes the app to crash down and relaunch repeatedly, leading to excessive Bluetooth communication, which in turn drains the pump battery and leads to an unexpected pump shutdown.

More than 85K t:slim X2 insulin pumps distributed in the U.S. between February 12 and March 13 have been affected by the issue, which the FDA has categorized as a correction.

Tandem Diabetes (TNDM) sent a letter to affected customers in March requesting them to update the app.

After a discussion with the management, Citi said that 98% of users have updated their apps to version 2.7.1, released on March 13. The company has not seen any issues with the latest app version and expects the update to permanently fix the defect. Citi retains its Neutral rating on the stock.

XX

HIGH POINT, N.C., March 04, 2024 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — vTv Therapeutics Inc. (Nasdaq: VTVT), a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the development of cadisegliatin (TTP399) as an adjunctive therapy to insulin for the treatment of type 1 diabetes (“T1D”), today announced the submission of the study protocol to the FDA for the Company’s first Phase 3 trial evaluating the safety and efficacy of its lead candidate, cadisegliatin, in adults diagnosed with T1D.

The Phase 3 study will assess two doses of orally administered cadisegliatin versus placebo in patients currently being treated with multiple daily insulin injections and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, who use a continuous glucose monitor (CGM). The primary efficacy endpoint of the study will compare the incidence of Level 2 or Level 3 hypoglycemic events between cadisegliatin-treated subjects and those in the placebo group.

It received a breakthrough therapy designation (BTD) based on its Phase II trial (NCT03335371), which showed a 40% decrease in the frequency of severe and symptomatic hypoglycaemic events along with a decrease in serum and urine ketone events in the treatment group.

Cadisegliatin is not yet licensed or approved anywhere globally and has not been demonstrated to be safe or effective for any use. Cadisegliatin (TTP399) is an investigational liver-selective glucokinase activator that has been studied in healthy volunteers and in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

XX

Timing is everything.. the same day we released our episode about the Eversense CGM last week, Senseonics, in collaboration with Ascensia Diabetes Care, has announced that its Eversense product received an integrated continuous glucose monitoring (iCGM) designation from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

This marks Eversense as the first fully implantable device to achieve such status, paving the way for future devices of its kind through the FDA’s De Novo pathway.

The iCGM designation signifies that the system can be integrated with compatible medical devices, such as insulin pumps, to create an automated insulin delivery (AID) system.

https://www.medicaldevice-network.com/news/senseonics-eversense-icgm-designation-fda/

XX

Commercial

XX

 

 

XX

A big win for Georgians with Medicaid who have #diabetes. Governor Brian Kemp signed into law a bill that expands #CGM access to persons with Medicaid and diabetes who are insulin therapy and removes the age limitation and endocrinology requirement. Please see ADA press release below. Please share.

https://lnkd.in/g_WVTNpi American Diabetes Association

 

XX

61-year-old ultrarunner Linda Carrier is the first woman to complete the World Marathon Challenge (seven marathons on seven continents in seven days) three times.

 

Plus, she has run 78 marathons and 55 half-marathons and is currently in the process of running a marathon in all 50 states with just 12 to go.

 

To add to the wow factor, Carrier has accomplished it all while managing type 1 diabetes for nearly 50 years.

 

“I naturally like to challenge myself, and when someone says [you have] a life-shortening disease, I’m like, heck it’s not. I’m going to show them that I’ll be the longest-living type 1 diabetic,” Carrier told Healthline.

 

She was 14 years old when she learned she had the condition. Because her older sister had been diagnosed a few years before, Carrier was familiar with the symptoms. She also knew the outlook was daunting.

She will finish her latest goal of running a marathon in all 50 states next October in Twin Cities, Minnesota. The race will be sponsored by Medtronic.

 

“Seems like the perfect way to finish,” Carrier said. “And to show that type 1 diabetes should not stop you from reaching any of your goals, whatever it might be.”

https://www.healthline.com/health-news/linda-carrier-diabetes-marathon

XX

Join us again soon!

Check out this episode!

This week, what growing up with diabetes meant for career choices, financial decisions, and family relationships. Madison Carter is a local news anchor who makes T1D very visible – and she does not hold back. She’s generous with incredible insight into how she was raised, sacrifices her family made and what her mom and dad have to say now.

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

Find out more about Moms’ Night Out – registration is open for Denver!

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Learn more about Gvoke Glucagon Gvoke HypoPen® (glucagon injection): Glucagon Injection For Very Low Blood Sugar (gvokeglucagon.com)

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Edgepark Medical Supplies

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

Instagram

Twitter

Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

Check out this episode!

This week, managing type 1 diabetes into your 70s is a bit of uncharted waters.. While thankfully more and more people are living long with T1D, that wasn’t always the case. I’m taking to Dianne Mattiace who is in her early 70s and was diagnosed as an adult, 30 years ago. She was the first person in the US to use the Eversense CGM when it was approved in 2018 and she’s still using it today. She answers your questions about this implantable CGM, why she’s stayed with it and what else she does to manage in retirement and beyond.  

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

More about Eversense here

Our previous episodes about Eversense here 

Find out more about Moms’ Night Out 

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Learn more about Gvoke Glucagon Gvoke HypoPen® (glucagon injection): Glucagon Injection For Very Low Blood Sugar (gvokeglucagon.com)

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Edgepark Medical Supplies

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

Instagram

Twitter

Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

Episode Transcription: 

Stacey Simms  0:00
Diane Matisse. Thanks so much for joining me. Welcome to Diabetes Connections. It’s great to talk to you.

Dianne Mattisse  0:04
Thank you so much for having me. Yeah, let’s

Stacey Simms  0:07
jump right in. Let’s start with your diagnosis story, because you were initially misdiagnosed, right? Take me through what happened? Yes,

Dianne Mattisse  0:15
I was 40 years old. And my family history was type two diabetes. And they actually, as soon as you say that to a physician, and it was a general practitioner, it was not an endocrinologist, they automatically just put that label on me and said, you know, you’re another type two in your family. It went on for about three months. And I actually was in the honeymoon phase, which now was not even recognized back then. But I, it was at the time where you’re making enough insulin to keep you from going into DKA into ketoacidosis end up in a hospital, but not enough to make you feel well, so my blood sugar’s were still rising, the medication they had me on wasn’t working. And finally, after, I think about three or four months, well, during that time, I saw an endocrinologist. And he also was doing a lot of testing, even the C peptide, which is now a diagnosis tool wasn’t able to be done where I lived, they had to send it out to a lab in Atlanta. So once that was kind of established, he admitted me, and started me on insulin and, you know, multiple injections per day,

Stacey Simms  1:35
why did you What led you to actually seek out an endocrinologist?

Dianne Mattisse  1:39
I was not feeling great with the general doctor treating me and I just kept getting worse and worse. And I was taking oral medications, they weren’t all these designer meds that they have now for type twos. Back then it was couple pills. So I was I would call them increase the pills. And as I was increasing the pills over the three or four months, so was my blood sugar increasing, and I kept losing weight. And I’m thinking, well, this is a great diet I’m on I was eating better. But my blood sugar’s were going into the three hundreds. So finally, I had been in the medical field before that, actually, it was in the medical field at the time, I was a controller for a nursing home company, but it didn’t really have access to a lab or anything like that. I was actually the Regional Controller. And I was on the financial side, right? So I actually went to a lab got my blood sugar taken. I didn’t even think to buy a meat or anything like that, which I should have, but I did not. And I kept seeing my blood sugar’s go up and up and up. And so I finally just on my own said, I’m gonna go to an endocrinologist. And as soon as I went, he told me, I think you’re a type two. And type one, I think you are type one, misdiagnosed as a type two. And let’s do some testing. He started he did the C peptide, sent it out, did a bunch of other tests. I have no no recollection. Now, it’s been 33 years of what else he did. But over that weekend, so that was like a Friday over that weekend, I just be compensated more I started getting muscle cramps, I called him and he said, go to the hospital Monday morning, seven o’clock and bring a bag you’re being admitted. So I did. And he said, I was really on the brink of going into diabetic ketoacidosis. So it was really, really just, you know, it’s good that I went to the hospital that morning and got on insulin, I think but I think a lot of people when they’re diagnosed after 40 or 35, I just talked to somebody the other day who was diagnosed at like 55. And I think the older you get, the less they even think it just automatically think you’re a type two. Yeah, yeah,

Stacey Simms  3:58
it’s something like half of all cases of Type one are occurring and people over the age of 20. But as you say, once you’re over 20, many doctors don’t know that it could be type one. I hear a lot of stories of Pupil misdiagnoses type two who have type one of a lot of people who have lotta, you know, latent autoimmune diabetes in adults. I don’t hear a lot of these stories happening in the late 1990s. Or prior to that time period. Did you ever talk to your endocrinologist? Like, I don’t want to say he was cutting edge because it was pretty obvious you were suffering, right at that point. But it is interesting that this was 33 years ago, and somebody finally got it right.

Dianne Mattisse  4:41
I think I was just so sick. By the time I actually went to see him and I had lost about 40 pounds. By that point. He looked at the amount of medication oral meds that I was on, and I think it had been about a period of three months and I kind of was keeping track of the blood sugars on a piano And a little notebook back then, that we had. And he looked at that and said, you know, you’re you’re decompensating, you’re not doing well on any of these meds, the amount of weight I had lost. And I was young, younger. So I wasn’t. I mean, I was losing muscle mass, but it wasn’t as noticeable if I had been 60 or 70 years old. And he said, You’re losing muscle mass. And you’re just feeling so bad. I mean, I remember going on a trip with my husband. And we went to the Statue of Liberty at that point. It was you were able to go up the stairs and go into the statue. Yeah, well, we actually went with some family members. And this is before I actually was on insulin about a month before. And I remember going up three steps, and turning around and telling my husband, I can’t do this. Oh, wow. And we had always, I had always been going to the gym be doing aerobics. Back then more of a runner than walking. Walking is more popular. Now. Of course, you know, less on the joints and everything. But I was a runner back then I was into aerobics. I was very athletic skier and, you know, snow ski or water skier. And he looked at me and said, What do you mean? And I said, I can’t do it. I’m out of breath on step number three, I need to turn around. So that kind of pushed me to figure out. And now when I look back at those pictures of what I look like, I’m like, I actually looked very, very sick. I mean, that weight for me was not a normal weight ever in my life. Maybe when I was 10.

Stacey Simms  6:45
For a lot of weight, I

Dianne Mattisse  6:48
think I weighed 103. And I mean, I think I weighed more than that. Honestly, in fourth grade. Yeah.

Stacey Simms  6:53
Wow. Especially for somebody athletic. That’s really tiny. Right? Right. Um,

Dianne Mattisse  6:59
you know what it is? It’s it’s denial. Oh, because nobody in my family. I mean, my family thought I look great. You’re, you’re on a diet, you’re doing great, everything’s good. But they didn’t know how I was really feeling you know, health wise, I felt horrible. And weak and, and constantly thirsty, and constantly urinating and, you know, in the bathroom all the time and starving me, you actually are starving your body. And it’s just the worst, it was a thirst. When I describe it to people, it was a thirst that no matter how much you drank, you could never make it go away. It was just something that was there all the time. So I mean, it was very, I was very lucky to find the right endocrinologist that, like you said, was a little bit of ahead of time, and kind of just said, You’re a type one. You’re not a type two, there’s just no way and immediately hospitalized me and got me on track. So

Stacey Simms  8:00
I’m imagining that you did go home with a meter this time. Do you mind taking us through your technology journey because we’re here to talk about you know what, you’re one of the first people to use the ever since

Dianne Mattisse  8:12
I was first I was the first person implanted in the United States with the ever since and my doctor who is in Opelika, Alabama was the for about Columbus, Georgia. And he has an office in OPA Leica. He was the first person to be sort of the first physician to be certified. Wow, the technology. Let me tell you technology now. I always say this if you have to have a disease and a chronic disease. I’m so happy now that I have all of the help and see GMs I had actually left the hospital with a meter. And it was like, I think he had to wait two minutes for it to actually read. You know, your drop of blood. It had to be a much bigger drop of blood and all that. My doctor at the time would not there were pumps, but they were obviously much larger. And the CGM, the first CGM that I had was I had to go to the hospital and have it put on and I wore it it was a big box and I had to wear it for seven days. Then go back to the hospital. They would take the recording out they would review and and print everything, send it to my endocrinologist and then I had to go back to the endocrinologist for a report. So it only took a week of my life and of course, like anybody else I was sure that I was doing everything right and trying to have good read, you know a good recording done. So I would get a good report when I went there. Now I had changed my my original endocrinologist had a family tragedy with his son, so I had to change endocrinologist. And I thought I had a really good endocrinologist. But for some reason, she didn’t really push me with the CGM. So I really pushed that. And I have been on all of them. I’ve been on all of the 10 to 14 day ones I’ve been on. Like I said, the original one that had to wear for seven days. And honestly, the last one, not the last few years before I went on, ever since I did not, they didn’t get along with my body. I mean, I had too many alarms. I had too many failures. I had skinny rotations, I had just inaccuracies. And I finally said to myself, I’m not being compliant because of it. So I just started doing more meter checks. And I tried to manage my diabetes, which I could not I mean, to be honest, I was thinking I was compliant when I when I moved to Alabama and got with my physician now, my endocrinologist. I was not I was not being compliant, because I didn’t have a CGM. So I mean, it’s almost impossible to stick your finger every five minutes. I was gonna say do

Stacey Simms  11:19
you think the right word is compliant, though? I mean, you were trying, right? It’s not like you were in your like, I hit that non compliant page. I

Dianne Mattisse  11:27
was right. You’re right. I was trying. But now that I look back, I’m like, I should have. Well, there was nothing like ever since before I got it. So it was funny thing. My husband heard about it. I actually moved to Alabama a year earlier than my husband he was working down there want to do is finish his job for another year. And so I moved to Alabama, because we bought a house on the spur of the moment. We’re on a visit up here. And so yeah, we weren’t it wasn’t a plan. It was not a plan. We just did it. So when I came up here, I did not have a physician here. I didn’t even have a primary. But I did have a pump and I needed to get my supplies. So I I actually called there’s only two endocrinologist in Auburn, Alabama. And that’s about a half hour from where I live. So one of them wanted me to have a referral. But I didn’t even have a primary yet. So I called the other one. Because I needed to get my insulin and my supplies. And they gave me an appointment. And it was funny. I went in on a Thursday to see Dr. Baliga. And he looked at me and said, This is my you know, I’m a new patient started talking to me about the ever since. Have you ever seen it? Have you ever heard about it? And I said, you know, it’s funny. My husband saw something on the news about it a few months ago, and he mentioned it to me, but I hadn’t seen anything else about it. So he started telling me about it that it was something that was placed under the skin. You wore it for at that time, it was 90 days now it’s 180 days. And I said well, let’s let’s do it today, because he made it sound so wonderful that you wouldn’t have to be doing, you know, I would know something every five minutes, I would know if you know and I was familiar with other products that gave you arrows, whether you’re going up whether you’re going down so you can kind of fix things as you’re going along. I didn’t have that right now. When I went to see him so I’m like, Ah, it sounds great. He goes well wait, we we haven’t got he was at the FDA had certified it. He was certified, but they had to bring the team from Atlanta at the time. So he says but we can do a Tuesday. And I’m like, Okay, I can’t wait. I mean, I was so excited. So I had it placed on Tuesday four days after I saw him and I’m now on number 24th sensor and it has been actually so life changing for me i One of the main reasons I was so anxious and happy to hear about something like that is because I was having severe low blood sugars at night and nothing not to wake me up. I mean I My husband actually would call me every morning at 839 o’clock to make sure I had made it through the night that I was still alive. So it was a horrible really way to live and I was having multiple sometimes multiple low blood sugars during the day and or blood glucose during the day. And then I would treat them and then I would go up and down you know so it was it was just up and down cycle and you don’t feel well with that at I don’t anyway most people don’t because you you know you now you have to fix this and you know hope that it fixes that. So once the I got on ever since that disappeared, basically disappeared from my life, I maybe have one, low blood sugar, maybe once every two months now, I have a very, very low percentage less than 1%, every 90 days. So it’s amazing to me how technology has changed my life and made me feel like I can actually live kind of like a normal life. I need it. And I also was never really addicted to looking at my phone all the time, like a lot of younger people do. And you know, I don’t do a lot of selfies and but now, I mean, I do sit at the table and have my phone there because I want to see what’s going on. And if I’m out to dinner, I put it there. And I want to see if it’s going down, is it going up? And it gives me that you know that that safety net of, I’m not going to go high, and I’m not going to go low. Do you mind if I ask

Stacey Simms  15:57
what other technology you’re using because the CGM alone isn’t going to prevent lows.

Dianne Mattisse  16:02
I have an insulin pump. I don’t have the loops. I don’t use that because I have the CGM that I 100% believe in and, and love it. I do have a meter. And I do have to calibrate the Eversense once a day, which to me, gives me that feeling of security and safety that I am getting good numbers throughout the day. And if something’s really off, you know if it feels like it’s off, I will check with my meter. But I use the meter a lot less to be honest, I you know, I really trust you ever since. And I mean, it’s been it’s proven to me because many times the meter and the ever since will have exactly the same number, or within a few a few numbers. And that makes me feel so much better. Right.

Stacey Simms  16:53
But you use you use a pump. That’s just I wouldn’t call it a dumb pump. But you don’t use an automated system. I

Dianne Mattisse  16:59
don’t use the loop. I don’t use the automated system. It has the capability. Okay, but but I don’t I just that’s not an important factor for me, right?

Stacey Simms  17:10
I mean, I’m just trying to be clear for folks that you know, we’re listening, you know what you’re using in right with, I mean, my son, it’s funny to look at technology because he was diagnosed in 2006. So we went, you know, shots and meter, and then DME pump and meter for forever. And then CGM pump your meter to calibrate like you say, and now in 2020, he went closed loop. So he’s got a pump that communicates with the CGM. So it’s just wild to see how it all works. All right, all the questions people have about ever since tell us about the insertion and the removal, because a lot of that makes a lot of people uncomfortable to think about.

Dianne Mattisse  17:49
Right, right. I think the placement of the ever sense has, I think a lot of people think about it as a surgery and as this and that, it really is such a tiny little, maybe just a tiny little incision, not even as big as your pinky fingernail. And they actually, you know, they numb you, of course, and then they put the little the little sensor right under the skin. I mean, you can actually kind of feel it through the skin, you know, which is helpful when you’re placing the transmitter. And it doesn’t. I mean, honestly, it doesn’t hurt at all, I’d rather have that done and then have my teeth cleaned, to be honest. I mean, it’s it’s really that simple. And I’ve had, like I said, I’m on number 24. And it’s really nothing the removal is the same thing. It takes maybe the insertion the longest part of the insertion or the placement is getting the Lidocaine to numb the area, you know, they actually do it in a very sterile way comes with a big sterile cape. And you know, you’re laying on the table and they clean the area very well. I’ve never had an infection I’ve never had any what I would call any bleeding I mean it might bleed a little tiny bit, but they cover it with steri strips, there’s no stitching, there’s no you know, there’s nothing like you have to go back and have surgery looked at it or anything like that there’s no stitches or anything like that. So the removal my physician has always used an ultrasound for removal. So I think that has become very popular because I belong some a lot of these pages that people talk about it and I can actually feel mine because it really is right under the skin and but I think the ultrasound kind of helps them know exactly where the end is. Because listen, there’s you’re putting it under the skin, it could move a little bit it could you know turn or whatever, right so I’ve never really had any issues. I mean, you hear horror stories from people who have never even had it, which really is quite annoying, because I think it’s just like slamming a restaurant, if you’ve never eaten there, you know, just and I think the greatest thing is that we have a choice. Now, it might not be for everyone. But it is something that for people who get these severe irritations or allergies to certain products, you know, with some of the 10, the 14, ones, 14, day 10 to 14 day CGMS. And also, I think a lot of people worry about getting it knocked off. And the cost of it, were this the transmitter, which where you were on the outside, if it comes off, you know, you just stick a new adhesive on it and stick it back on. The other great thing is, you know, we live by a lake and we have a boat. And if I want to go swimming, I take my transmitter off, I get into the water. And I don’t have to worry about anything, I don’t have like a permanent thing going into my body a permanent or fish going in, you know, which always kind of bothered me going into a pool or going into a lake or something like that. This is once that heals up after a couple of days, there’s nothing really on the outside plus it you know, the great thing about ever since also is it uses a different kind of technology. It’s not the same technology as other CGMS use. So I believe and this is personally my opinion, I believe that it’s much more accurate because of the type of technology that they’re using. It’s very advanced,

Stacey Simms  21:47
you being the way the sensor reads. Yes, the way the sensor reads. And you said you had a lot of irritation from the other CGM. You don’t have any irritation with the adhesive that the transmitter sticks

Dianne Mattisse  21:59
on at all. None at all. None at all. The little adhesive ups the little adhesive that we put on the back of the transmitter is very very skin friendly. Very skin friendly i and I’m fair and I have blue fair skin blue wise, so I have had pretty severe irritations with other CGM said I had to move them around and try different things and try different products under it. Also products to keep them on, which haven’t had to do that either. You know, this kind of stays on? And I don’t really think about it. I mean, I think more about checking my phone now than I do thinking about having the sensor. So tell me again,

Stacey Simms  22:47
this is your 24th Yes, sir. How long will this one stay in?

Dianne Mattisse  22:54
Six months, not? Well, it stays now up to 180 days or up to six months. beginning it was up to three months. And I do know that the FDA is working on the approval for the what 365 Day, which we’re all looking forward to that. What I mean, I love going to my doctor so I’m like, you know, I we always kid around. So you know, we have to stop meeting like this. But yes, I mean, it’s a it’s going to be quite awesome for a lot of people to get it for one year because I do go to my doctor every three months to get prescriptions for the other supplies I need and insulin and things like that. But some people only go to see their endocrinologist or their primary doctor only once a year to manage your diabetes.

Stacey Simms  23:49
In the six months, I’m just trying to you know, I’m trying to picture that you think that all the different the CGM changes that would happen within six months. Have you had any issues any reason to go back to your endo and say take a look at this get out the ultrasound machine or is it smooth sailing for you?

Dianne Mattisse  24:05
I haven’t had any issues for several years. I mean, we’re going on six years this July that I’ve had it the greatest thing is which I’ve never used the most recent products I’m not sure but but the ever since has an online or on your phone whole picture of what’s going on. So I’ll tell you how long you’re you know how much time you’re in. It will tell you exactly the percentage time and range and it also will tell you seven days, 14 days, 30 days, 60 days, 90 days so you can actually see and it will also tell you what your estimated A1C will be it will tell you what percentage is low you’re in the low area what percentage you’re in high so it gives you all kinds of information. The greatest thing is my doctor has that information also. So if I make a call to him, and I say, you know, I’m not doing well, something’s not right, I can’t get the sugars down and, and it’s not the pump I, you know, I’ve moved it, I’ve changed insulin, all that thing, all those things, then he will go on there and say this is what you need to do. But this is what we need to change around, you know, because it’s all based on the insulin that you’re getting and the activity. It’s nothing really I don’t feel to do with the CGM. Right? So with the sensor, so I haven’t ever had to call him and say, I think it’s a sensor. I think most of the time, it’s just been the amount of insulin. Or maybe I’m sick. You know, maybe if I have an illness that’s not, you know, I had or I made a couple months ago, I had take a steroid shot my wrist. And that just blew me out of the water. So I called him and he was like, Okay, this is what we need to do for two days, you know, so the CGM? No, I mean, I find no fault with that. I mean, I think if the built in protection there is if your meter reading when you put in your calibration in the morning, which I do mine in the morning, you can kind of set it up to do whenever, but I always want to do it first thing in the morning, because I want to know where I’m starting anyway, my day, is it going to be good, bad or ugly that day? So I put my calibration number in there. And if it’s, let’s say it’s off, it’s off by 30 or 40 points, you know, you, the sensor itself will tell you something’s not right. And it will actually ask you to do another calibration in another hour or so. So, to me, it’s, it’s kind of a safety check. So that I don’t worry about it going off, and being kind of crazy on its own. Because, you know, if something like that happens, and I’m sure with technology, everything has, you know, kinks in it. They you would call the customer service, they have great customer service. And they can actually do a lot with Reese not resetting it actually totally, but figuring out if it really is the sensor really is you. I’ve had to do a reset on the sensor maybe?

Stacey Simms  27:20
Sure. Um, I’m curious, you had mentioned you’re in some groups, and I’m sure you know, people who also were there ever since and a lot of people who are interested in it. What’s the first question people ask you about it? Like diabetes people?

Dianne Mattisse  27:35
How about how is the insertion? How is the placement? Does it hurt? Does it scar does it? How is the surgery? You know, they all like to think it’s surgery and everything? Because listen, when you’re thinking about that you’re thinking about, I don’t know, maybe they’re thinking of a transplant or something. But it’s a very simple thing. And there’s a lot of other medical procedures now that use these placements under the skin. There’s hormonal ones. I know there’s a testosterone one, I think there’s an there’s one for birth control now. So it’s it’s, you know, very upfront technology that’s being used a lot in medical treatment. So it’s not anything, you know, that people should be afraid of. I mean, this is an advanced, very advanced product, I think, and simple life is so much simpler with this, you know, just, I mean, once every six months now you go in, I mean, you’re it’s 15 minutes, and you know, I mean, the 10 minutes, I’m waiting for the Lidocaine to work. That’s, that’s the biggest thing.

Stacey Simms  28:44
Do you have scoring? Do you have a scar on other very

Dianne Mattisse  28:46
fair, like I said before, and I don’t scar and usually the FDA requires that they switch arm to arm every six months. So like, they’ll do the left arm and then they do the right arm. So in that meantime, I can’t even like when I go back to have the removal. If if the sensor has already expired, like but I usually try to go a couple days before. If it’s expired, of course, it’s not going to have a reading. And then, you know, I have to really figure out where it is because I don’t see the scar anymore. There is actually I think it’s so tiny that it heals up. I mean, you’re supposed to leave the bandaging and everything on instructions or five days. Usually, it’s healed up in about two or three days completely healed. You can’t even really see anything. So I mean, some people would scar I would imagine, but I mean, I think you have that’s the trade off or having a totally accurate CGM. That’s easier. That’s less expensive than things that are failing and you have to replace all the time I mean, for me, it’s, it was never I never thought twice about that. I may be by my age, I have a lot of scars anyway, from falling, and it’s like, you know, I’m not worried about having perfect skin anymore. So, but no, actually, because I’m fair. I, I did think about that, but but only for about two seconds.

Stacey Simms  30:25
Well, you know, and if you don’t mind, um, you know, I’d love to talk about aging with type one. I mean, you know, it’s different. Life is different from 20 to 50. Certainly, you’ve mentioned like, you don’t run so much anymore, you know, so I don’t want to make a whole Pash of like we all know we’re getting older. For lucky, we know we’re getting older as like, but you know, years and years ago, people weren’t living past 50 type 1 diabetes, let alone 70. And I have listeners in their 80s. And we know people in their 90s with type one. So it’s a pretty wild. So I

Dianne Mattisse  30:58
73. It’s changed 73. My A1C is 6.6. I’m so proud of that. Because when I first got the Eversense inserted, it was in the mid nines or a little bit higher. It wasn’t 10, but it was in the night. So I’ve made tremendous strides in getting it down being healthier. And I’m just very proud of that. Because you know, I would like to be in the fives but I, you know, I’m fine. My physician is fine with it being in the sixes, getting rid of the low blood sugars was a huge thing for me because many, many people die in the middle of the night from having a low blood sugar. And that still happens to people and really with CGM and all these choices, it shouldn’t happen. And the fact that the CGM gives me this vibration, I know all anywhere, anytime, if I’m out eating, if I’m in bed sleeping, I know I’m going to get a vibration that’s going to tell me what’s going on. So that has really helped me be happier in my life. I think I worked 25 years in health care as administrator and then 25 years is real estate. Now I’m retired but I do a lot. I have a charity I’m treasurer for up here in Alabama, that does art. We provide art classes and projects for kids in the schools here, elementary schools and some high schools. I have a little word working business with my sister here, we make maps of the lake and we sell to all the little stores around here and everything. And I keep very busy, I also do a transaction. I’m a transaction broker for my son who’s a broker in Florida. So I do a lot of paperwork online for him. So I keep very busy. But the fact that I’m getting older, you know, and I know people will say this, you talk to anybody old, your mind is still young, you still look you know, when you look in the mirror, you go Who is that old lady, but when you when you when you feel good, and I feel so much better with a normal blood sugar. I don’t feel like I’m that age, you know, I mean, I I enjoy traveling, I traveled to Florida quite a bit because of a lot of relatives and friends still down there having been there for a long living there my entire life basically. And I feel comfortable traveling by myself, which is a huge thing. Because I can tell you 10 years ago, I did not I mean, I always wanted to have my husband or my son or somebody with me. So that getting old and having diabetes. And I’ve been very lucky because I don’t have any side effects. I don’t have any complications from having diabetes for so long. I mean, on one hand, I was very lucky, I didn’t have to go through puberty or childbearing. So I got it when all that was done, had my children and everything. But on the other hand, you know, 33 years when I think back 33 years is a long time to be dealing with a chronic disease 24/7 And I don’t think anybody really understands that it is a full time job. It is something that is with you 24/7 You cannot forget about it even for a day. I mean, it’s dangerous if you think you can, but you just can’t. But getting older. I just like to I’m so excited to see all the things that have have come from diabetic technology, all the opportunities that we have now. I love being part of the ever since group of people because honestly I never knew anybody growing up, you know, during when I was diagnosed at 40 I never knew another type one. I felt very isolated and kind of depressed about it because I’m like, even in my family, they didn’t really acknowledge it because Nobody had the knowledge about it, they knew a lot about type twos and you should lose weight, eat better and exercise, but they didn’t really know much about why I was a type one or how I was managing it or how encompassing it was to your life. So I think just having better communities, among us is has helped tremendously for me. And the ever since has just been, like I said, before, life changing for me, no matter what age I would have gotten it, I think it’s just the best product because it’s the easiest product to use. And I’ve used them all, I mean, you can’t name one that I haven’t used and, and I’ve gone through the progression from when they had to put it on the hospital until the very newest ones. And nothing really, my body didn’t like them for whatever reason. But getting old is great. I just look at it and go, I have friends from first grade still, that I see when I go down. And I’m like, you know, and they, you know, most of my close friends know when everything and they, they are very supportive, but they don’t really understand it. So now that I understand it better. I’m okay with that. I mean, I think age has just made me feel like, Hey, I am so lucky to be here and feel as good as I do can be as active as I want to be. No, I don’t run anymore, and I don’t ski anymore. I last skied when I was 65 And I’m like, hey, that’s it. I’m done. I’m not doing that anymore. I you know, I got away without ever having a broken bone or anything. Or last time we went, you know, I went with a bunch of younger girls and, and family, bunch of family. And and I’m like, Hey, I’m skiing is good as he’s 40 year olds, but I’m not risking it anymore. Yeah.

Stacey Simms  36:45
So I meant to ask Do you know is ever since covered by Medicare? I can look that. Yes, I

Dianne Mattisse  36:49
did. Absolutely. Now the first couple years, it was not. And my husband I made that decision to pay out of pocket. But yes, it is covered now. That’s great. Yes, right. covered. And it covers the insertion and the removal for the physician also, which I think some of the other insurances don’t but but yeah, that was not the deciding factor for me. I mean, we paid out of pocket, and and we just knew it was going to be the best thing for me.

Stacey Simms  37:18
Good to know, though. I mean, it’s really interesting, again, with a lot of my older listeners, you know, and as we are so excited that people with type one are living to Medicare year and beyond, right, it’s really important to look at these things. It is it’s a deciding factor for a lot of people. Yes. Okay, before I let you go, Diane, how did you get hooked up as an ambassador? I mean, it makes sense. You’re the very first patient in America. So I guess it’s kind of a dumb question that everybody wants to speak out, you know, right?

Dianne Mattisse  37:42
Well, I never Well, okay. So like I said, I never really was in a group of people, I didn’t really even have anybody. You know, nobody in my family, nobody to talk to. So the team came from Atlanta, when I had my first insertion, placement, they’d like you to lose placement. So when I had my first placement, the team from Atlanta came, and that was six years ago, this July. So the person who is head of the sales now I believe, she was on that team, and she came in, and we kind of hit it off. And then I think it went on for about, I think six months later, they decided to get a group together, and call them the patient ambassadors. And that’s when that is before a Sensia actually got began, began to be involved in the marketing. So that was when Sen. psionics was doing it. So this person picked eight or nine people. And we still have, I believe, four or five of the original ambassadors, and now it’s more demographically varied. You know, we have young, I obviously, I’m the older person, you know, but it is good, because I think it’s, you know, it shows that it’s for everyone. I mean, there’s not an age barrier. And there’s not a weight barrier. There’s not any kind of barrier, except you have to be a type one and you have to want this device. And it’s just but that’s how are we got hooked up and we kind of it kind of slacked off a little bit when we became the marketing went over to a Sensia. And they had that agreement with a Sensia. And then they picked four or five of the original people and and you know, we’re still very close, we have our own little group chats and things like that. So and it’s good because now I know if I have a question or if they have a question we can get with each other. It’s it that is the greatest thing. I think younger people or anybody now, Facebook has pages, you know, people like you who are spreading the word. I mean, if there had been This, I think I would have felt so much better. I mean it I’m almost getting teary here. But I think I would have felt so much more inclusive, then than I felt for many, many, many years. So I think that you’re doing a wonderful thing by spreading the word and helping people and sharing. And I think you know, somebody like your son, who’s 19 is going to have a whole different experience with this than I did. And, you know, because you just by 40, you’ve gone through all those teenage angst and everything but and I was done having children everything, but then it’s like, what the heck now? i What is this, you know, coming on, and I was healthy at that time. And I’m like, What did I ever do? Never did drugs, never smoked. Never, you know, there wasn’t all the information about immune system, autoimmune and it runs in my family. We have so much autoimmune disease, but not type one. Yeah. So but the patient ambassador, it’s a greatest group, we have a blast when we get together. That’s awesome. Well,

Stacey Simms  41:10
doing the show is truly a privilege for me, you know, getting to talk to people like you and learning so much. I really appreciate it. Diane, thank you so much for joining me. I hope we connect again soon. So

Dianne Mattisse  41:21
and I hope you are very good at that editing.

 

Check out this episode!

It’s In the News! A look at the top diabetes stories and headlines happening now. Top stories this week: A new study links emulsifiers, a common ingrediant, to type 2 diabetes, reserachers map out the pancreas in a new way that’s already yielding new information, new guidliens about using GLP-1s and SGLT-2 medications with exisiting oral meds, genetic T1D studies and more!

Find out more about Moms’ Night Out 

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Learn more about Gvoke Glucagon Gvoke HypoPen® (glucagon injection): Glucagon Injection For Very Low Blood Sugar (gvokeglucagon.com)

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Edgepark Medical Supplies

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

Instagram

Twitter

Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

Check out this episode!

This week, catching up with Medtronic’s Senior Director of Global Medical Affairs Dr. Jennifer McVean. It’s been one year since the 780G was approved in the US, what does the device – and its seven-day infusion set – look like in the real world. Plus, we have a big discussion about the future of type 1 diabetes – Dr. McVean has lead some significant trials – she lives with type 1 and has some big ideas about changes she’d like to see.

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

This week, the newest pump coming to the market is called the twiist. It’s a very different shape – circular with a top half that twists off – with very different software – Tidepool Loop. The company behind this pump – they’re called Sequel – wants to be different as well, hoping to offer solutions to bigger issue than basal and bolus rates. It’s very ambitious and we have a wide ranging conversation about it all with Sequel’s CEO Alan Lotvin This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

Our episode about Tidepool Loop approval

Episode summary:

New insulin pump technology with AI-based loop algorithm and discreet design.

Insulin pump technology and its modern features.

New insulin pump with advanced features and compatibility with Dexcom CGM.

Diabetes management and new pump technology.

Insulin pumps and their compatibility with different insulin types and ages.

Affordable insulin pricing and accessibility, with a focus on improving patient outcomes.

New insulin pump for type 1 and 2 diabetes, with focus on upcoming demos and clinical trials.

AI-powered insulin pump for diabetes management.

It’s In the News! A look at the top diabetes stories and headlines happening now. Top stories this week: Dexcom launches direct-to-watch with the G7 in the UK and Ireland, more studies looking at heart benefits with Wegovy and diabetes, a new T1D study investigating an injectable to prevent overnight hypoglycemia, lobbying for Levimir, a ChatGPT diabetes diagnosis and more! Find out more about Moms’ Night Out  Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible! Learn more about Gvoke Glucagon Gvoke HypoPen® (glucagon injection): Glucagon Injection For Very Low Blood Sugar (gvokeglucagon.com) Omnipod – Simplify Life Learn about Dexcom  Edgepark Medical Supplies Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens  Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter: Sign up for our newsletter here Here’s where to find us: Facebook (Group) Facebook (Page) Instagram Twitter Check out Stacey’s books! Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com  Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com Episode transcription with sources: Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I’m Stacey Simms and every other Friday I bring you a short episode with the top diabetes stories and headlines happening now. XX In the news is brought to you by Edgepark simplify your diabetes journey with Edgepark XX Dexcom direct to watch is live in the UK and Ireland.  First announced in 2017..  this is probably the feature most listeners have asked me to ask Dexcom about. It should be available in the US this year.. and yes.. this means direct from transmitter to watch OR transmitter to phone AND transmitter to your medical device, the G7 is the first CGM that can beam its info to three devices. Btw, big thanks to my my friend Kamil Armacki for this news – you may know him better at Nerdabetic – he posted a video all about hit and I’ll link that up, like all of my sources, in the show notes. XX New study about Wegovy – that shows the drug helped people with type 2 diabetes who also had a specific obesity-related heart condition. This condition happens when the heart pumps normally, but the organ is too stiff to fill properly. The researchers say weight loss is a factor, but it doesn’t explain everything. Wegovy was first approved in 2021 to treat obesity. Just last month, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration also approved Wegovy to reduce the risk of cardiovascular death, heart attack and stroke in obese/overweight adults with heart disease. This latest study offers up fresh evidence that Wegovy’s benefits extend to people with diabetes. I’m not sure the surprise here, because Wegovy is the exact same drug as Ozempic.. which is only approved for people with diabetes. Worth noting – Novo Nordisk funded this study – they make Ozempic and Wegovy. https://www.usnews.com/news/health-news/articles/2024-04-09/wegovy-helps-those-with-both-diabetes-heart-failure-study XX Statins raise the risks for increased glucose levels and the development of type 2 diabetes among people who don’t have it but those risks are outweighed by the cardiovascular benefit, new data suggested. Big study review of 23 trials involved more than 150-thousand people. Moreover, they say, “since the effect of statin therapy on measures of glycemia within an individual is small, there is likely to be little clinical benefit in measuring glucose concentrations and A1c values routinely after starting statin therapy with the aim of making comparisons to values taken before the initiation of a statin. However, people should continue to be screened for diabetes and associated risk factors and have their glycemic control monitored in accordance with current clinical guidelines.” In an accompanying editorial, Hertzel C. Gerstein, MD, and Marie Pigeyre, MD, PhD, both of McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, noted that the decreased absolute annual incidence of life-threatening cardiovascular outcomes with statins in people at high risk for type 2 diabetes “clearly exceeds the 0.1%-1.3% per year increased absolute incidence of type 2 diabetes.” The researchers say “these findings emphasize the importance of holistic care. As people at risk for cardiovascular outcomes are also at risk for type 2 diabetes, any prescription of a statin should be accompanied by promoting proven strategies to prevent or delay diabetes, such as modest weight reduction and increased physical activity. Finally, these findings emphasize the importance of always being alert for harmful adverse effects, even with the most beneficial and successful preventive therapies.” https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/statins-raise-diabetes-risk-cv-benefit-outweighs-it-2024a10006ol XX New study looking for participants will investigate a new medication to help avoid nighttime low blood sugars. Right now the medication is called ZT-01 – it’s an injectable that works by increasing the amount of glucagon that is made during hypoglycemia. In a small proof-of-concept trial, 90% of participants saw increased glucagon levels after ZT-01 treatment, with no serious health events reported. Research suggests nighttime hypoglycemia is relatively common, with a global prevalence of 73%. You may be eligible to participate if you: Are 18 to 75 years old and have had type 1 diabetes for at least five years Have a history of recent nocturnal hypoglycemia Have an A1C ≤10% Have a BMI ≥18.5 and <33 kg/m2 People who use automated insulin delivery (AID) systems are not eligible. While this trial is not open to people with type 2 diabetes, Zucara is developing ZT-01 for both people with type 1 and with insulin-dependent type 2 diabetes, so future studies may be open to all people with diabetes. https://diatribe.org/join-clinical-trial-investigating-new-medication-prevent-nighttime-lows XX Nearly four in every 1,000 U.S. youths and five in every 1,000 U.S. adults reported having type 1 diabetes from 2019 through 2022, according to a research letter published online April 4 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.     Michael Fang, Ph.D., from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, and colleagues updated estimates of type 1 diabetes prevalence and characterized rates in population subgroups. The analysis included data from the 2019 to 2022 cycles of the National Health Interview Survey (110,283 adults and 30,708 youths).   The researchers found that among youths, the reported prevalence of type 1 diabetes was 3.5 per 1,000, with the highest rates seen among those aged 10 to 17 years (5.0), males (4.0), Hispanic youths (3.5), and non-Hispanic White youths (3.9). The reported prevalence in adults was 5.3 per 1,000 and was highest among those aged 45 to 64 years (6.1) and 65 years and older (5.3), non-Hispanic Black adults (4.8), and non-Hispanic White adults (5.9).   “These results are consistent with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s estimates for 2021,” the authors write. “This study adds to existing research by providing more precise up-to-date national estimates and by characterizing differences across subgroups.” https://medicalxpress.com/news/2024-04-prevalence-diabetes-steady-youth-adults.html XX No update or change on Novo Nordisk’s decision to discontinue Levimir, the long acting insulin they’re taking off the market. Alison Smart has a daughter with type 1 and says nothing else on the marked works as well for her. Smart has created the Alliance to Protect Insulin Choice, a volunteer organization and she’s lobbying congress. She’s also reached out to Mark Cuban.. and his Cost Plus pharmacy. Cuban says he’d be happy to partner with Novo to sell Levimir. Of course, no sign that Novo is interested in partnering with anyone and so far, Cost Plus doesn’t sell insulin. But we’ll keep watching this one.
Utah mom enlists Mark Cuban in fight for daughter’s access to insulin
XX Becton Dickinson said on Thursday it has increased production of medical syringes in the United States after the country’s drug regulator recommended not using some China-made syringes as part of its ongoing quality probe. The U.S.-based medical equipment maker — one of the world’s largest syringe suppliers — said it had increased manufacturing in its Nebraska and Connecticut facilities, since the U.S. Food and Drug Administration first raised concerns about China-made syringes in November.” For more information on BD’s commitment to quality, safety and our customers, please visit: https://www.bd.com/en-us/about-bd/quality-at-bd. https://investors.bd.com/news-events/press-releases/detail/826/bd-increases-domestic-production-to-support-u-s-health-care-need-for-syringes XX Another non invasive CGM to talk about.. but this one’s a little different. Biolinq has a wearable patch that uses an array of tiny electrochemical sensors to measure glucose levels from the intradermal space just below the surface of the skin. The technology combines glucose information with relative levels of activity in one device. They say they’ll complete US U.S. pivotal clinical trials this year. From the release: Placed on the upper forearm, the patch incorporates an intuitive display on the device. It informs users when glucose levels stand within a target range and when they go beyond a healthy range. The company designed its sensors on a silicon chip for redundancy, reliability and multi-analyte capabilities.   “Our technology approach enables access to a coveted, metabolically active compartment of the skin for biosensing without the use of introducer needles or bleeding,” said Rich Yang, CEO, Biolinq. “Over the past decade, our team has been pioneering a new biosensor platform designed to inform and inspire, with a mission to reach more people that are in need of simple solutions to improve metabolic health.”
Biolinq raises $58M to support intradermal glucose sensor
XX Commercial XX I’m sure this isn’t the first or only time it’s happened, but a South Carolina man used ChatGPT to get the correct diabetes diagnosis. Cooper Myers had been diagnosed with type 1 – his father, grandfather and great grandfather all had type 2 but they were all rally lean, he says almost underweight. Then in January 2023, Myers consulted the artificial intelligence program ChatGPT and asked: “If my father is a skinny type 2. My grandfather is a skinny Type 2 and I am a skinny Type 1 with no antibodies, then could we have a different kind of diabetes?” ChatGPT came back with a list of diabetes conditions that were not the common Type 1 or Type 2 and a little about each of them. One of them was MODY: Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young. It happens when there is a gene mutation through many generations. It also resembles Type 1 or Type 2. He went to a doctor – didn’t say anything about ChatGPT just pushed for another diabetes diagnosis and found out he has the gene mutation for MODY 2, one of the three kinds of MODY. His gene was 90% affected, which meant that while he did produce some insulin, it wasn’t enough. MODY is treated very differently – he can take oral meds twice a day – bit difference from an insulin pump.   https://www.statesman.com/story/news/healthcare/2024/04/06/chatgpt-ai-diabetes-austin-tx-man-finds-diagnosis-mody-maturity-onset-diabetes/73033228007/

There used to be a lot of bolus calculators in the app store, maybe you’ve used one and haven’t updated it in a while. Don’t try now.. it’s likely been pulled. Apple and the FDA are cracking down on this types of tools – no unreasonable, right? But surely there are more coming.. how hard can it be to create a simple insulin bolus calculator that’s FDA approved, easy to find, easy to use, free, and doesn’t require you buy anything else? Turns out, it’s pretty darn hard. We’re talking about that today with the inventor of such an app with an interesting story – he’s still in high school.

My guest this week was diagnosed with type 1 at age 13 – and while he and his family were calling in every blood sugar to help their doctor make adjustments, he thought there should be a better way. So Drew Mendelow created T1D1. I’ll let him and his parents Laura and Mike tell you more about it and what makes it unique.

It was recommended by his doctors to other patients and the word spread – they had tens of thousands of downloads. But in 2021, the FDA started cracking down on these kinds of apps and Apple pulled it. Drew has been working toward approval ever since and they’re pretty close.

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

Find out more about Moms’ Night Out 

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Learn more about Gvoke Glucagon Gvoke HypoPen® (glucagon injection): Glucagon Injection For Very Low Blood Sugar (gvokeglucagon.com)

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Edgepark Medical Supplies

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

Instagram

Twitter

Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

 

 


Diabetes technology is getting better and better – automated insulin systems that link pumps and CGMs – smart insulin pens that have precise calculations and reminders – it’s been quite the evolution over the past few years. But outcomes – time in range, A1Cs, aren’t exactly where experts thought they might be. I’m talking to Dr. Stephen Ponder about why that is, how a social media post he shared about this caused a strong reaction, and what does work for better long term outcomes.

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

Find out more about Moms’ Night Out 

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Learn more about Gvoke Glucagon Gvoke HypoPen® (glucagon injection): Glucagon Injection For Very Low Blood Sugar (gvokeglucagon.com)

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Edgepark Medical Supplies

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

Instagram

Twitter

Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

 

 


It’s In the News! A look at the top diabetes stories and headlines happening now. Top stories this week: a new study shows that drugs like Ozempic can be produced for just a few dollars, we upate the insulin vial shortage Lilly announced, a new pump has been FDA cleared, a genetically modified cow can product human insulin, and more!

Transcript and links below

Find out more about Moms’ Night Out 

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Learn more about Gvoke Glucagon Gvoke HypoPen® (glucagon injection): Glucagon Injection For Very Low Blood Sugar (gvokeglucagon.com)

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Edgepark Medical Supplies

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

Instagram

Twitter

Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

Episode transcription and links:

Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I’m Stacey Simms and every other Friday I bring you a short episode with the top diabetes stories and headlines happening now.

XX

In the news is brought to you by Edgepark simplify your diabetes journey with Edgepark

XX

Our top stories this week… all about cost.

XX

The blockbuster diabetes drug Ozempic could be manufactured for less than $5 a month, even as Novo Nordisk  charges close to $1,000 per month for the injection in the U.S. before insurance, a study released Wednesday suggests.

The study, from researchers at Yale University, King’s College Hospital in London and the nonprofit Doctors Without Borders, raises more questions about the hefty price tag of the top-selling diabetes treatment and similar drugs for weight loss, which are all part of a new class of treatments called GLP-1s.

The study also comes after years of political pressure on Novo Nordisk and other drugmakers to slash high costs of diabetes care, especially insulin.

Researchers found that a month’s supply of the treatment could be manufactured for an estimated 89 cents to $4.73. They evaluated manufacturing costs for the weekly injection along with a profit margin with an allowance for tax to produce those estimates, which they call “cost-based prices.”

 

Novo Nordisk’s list price for a monthly package of Ozempic is $935.77 before insurance and other rebates.

In a statement on Wednesday, Novo Nordisk declined to provide production costs for Ozempic and its weight loss drug counterpart Wegovy. But the Danish drugmaker noted that it spent almost $5 billion on research and development last year, and will spend more than $6 billion on a recent deal to boost manufacturing to meet demand for GLP-1s.

Separate research from the University of Liverpool and other researchers has found that Wegovy could be produced for $40 a month.

 

https://www.cnbc.com/2024/03/27/novo-nordisk-ozempic-can-be-made-for-less-than-5-a-month-study.html

XX

Update on the product shortage from Eli Lilly – I’m being careful not to say insulin shortage, because it looks like this is actually a vial shortage.

“The 10 mL [millilter] vials of Humalog® and Insulin Lispro Injection are or will be temporarily out of stock at wholesalers and some pharmacies through the beginning of April,” Lilly said in a recent statement.

The company said it is continuing to make the 10 mL vials, and “will ship them as soon as we can.” However, in the meantime patients with diabetes may need to consult with their doctors “to discuss switching to the same insulin in a prefilled pen or other insulin treatment options,” Lilly said.

Lilly said it is offering customers without insurance a coupon program offering insulin for $35.

 

Lilly spokesman Tarsis Lopez told CNN that the “dynamic nature of insulin supply and demand, coupled with a brief delay in manufacturing, led to the temporary supply constrain.

Editorial comment: this sounds like complete BS. I’ve reached out to Lilly and – if you’re listening – we’d love to have you on the show.

Lilly took in 2 point 1 billion dollars for the fourth quarter of 2023  – that’s three months NET income! So buy some vials and fix this.

https://www.usnews.com/news/health-news/articles/2024-03-25/eli-lilly-warns-that-2-insulin-products-will-be-in-short-supply

 

https://www.pharmaceutical-technology.com/news/eli-lilly-q4-2023-income/#:~:text=The%20company’s%20revenue%20in%20Q4,quarter%20of%20the%20previous%20year.&text=Lilly’s%20earnings%20per%20share%20grew,to%20%242.42%2C%20up%2013%25.

XX

Medicare wil now cover certain weight loss drugs but.. not for weight loss.. only when they are prescribed to prevent heart attacks and strokes. This includes Novo Nordisk’s Wegovy, a medication that’s surged in popularity due to its remarkable effects for treating obesity and excess weight in people without diabetes. Last month, the FDA expanded Wegovy’s uses, making it the first medication to reduce the risk of heart attacks, strokes, and cardiovascular death in people with heart disease and obesity.

Since 2003, Medicare has been banned from covering weight loss medications, because they are considered cosmetic. This, even though many studies have shown people living with obesity and excess weight are at a greater risk for other health conditions including type 2 diabetes, heart disease, certain cancers, and more.

Making things even more difficult, Medicare hasn’t been allowed to negotiate medication prices directly with drug companies – until recently. Thanks to the Inflation Reduction Act passed in 2022, Medicare has entered the first cycle of price negotiations for 10 drugs, including ones approved for diabetes, heart failure, and kidney disease.

Does Medicaid cover weight loss drugs?

Right now, Medicaid offers more flexibility than Medicare on coverage for weight loss medications – depending on what state you live in. As of 2023, the states that offer Wegovy and another weight loss drug Saxenda (liraglutide) without restrictions include:

California Delaware Minnesota Rhode Island Virginia

Five other states – Georgia, Michigan, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin – also offer coverage of Wegovy or Saxenda but with restrictions.

This is also a possible precedent for private insurers to follow suit.

https://diatribe.org/medicare-can-now-cover-wegovy-%E2%80%93-not-weight-loss

XX

 

 

A new study in the peer-reviewed journal Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics (DTT) evaluated the use of tirzepatide in overweight/obese adults with type 1 diabetes.

 

Tirzepatide is approved for managing type 2 diabetes. It improves glucose control, facilitates weight loss, and improves cardiovascular disease outcomes.

 

Satish Garg, MD, from the University of Colorado Denver, and coauthors, compared a group of adults with type 1 diabetes who were prescribed tirzepatide (off-label) to a control group of adults with type 1 diabetes who were not using any weight-loss medication. The investigators reported significantly larger declines in body mass index (BMI) and weight in the treated group compared to controls. HbA1c decreased in the treated group as early as three months and was sustained through a one-year follow-up. Insulin dose decreased at 3 months in the treated group and throughout the study period.

 

“We conclude that tirzepatide facilitated an average 18.5% weight loss (>46 pounds) and improved glucose control in patients with T1D at one year,” stated the investigators.

 

We recommend

Inhibiting the inhibitors: Development of the IAP inhibitor xevinapant for the treatment of locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

Robert L. Ferris et al., Cancer Treatment Reviews, 2023

Powered by

“Most of the patients with diabetes, both type 1 diabetes (T1D) and T2D are either overweight or obese in the United States and Western Europe,” state Satish Garg, MD, and coauthors of an accompanying Editorial. The newer therapies for diabetes, which are known to not only improve glucose control but also cause significant weight loss and improve cardiovascular disease and diabetic kidney disease are currently not approved in the U.S. for use in type 1 diabetes. “Using GLP analogs in patients with T1D poses many challenges, but with close follow-up both patients and the healthcare provider may see many benefits such as significant weight loss and reduction of insulin dose, increased time-in-range on continuous glucose monitoring, and improve HbA1c levels,” state the authors. Long -term side-effects like gastroparesis, GERD, Cholelithiasis etc. from use of GLP analogs in patients with diabetes are not known. The authors recommend proper randomized control trials especially in patients with T1D.

 

Source:

https://www.news-medical.net/news/20240322/Study-evaluates-the-use-of-tirzepatide-in-overweightobese-adults-with-type-1-diabetes.aspx

 

XX

State caps on insulin costs lowered privately insured patients’ out-of-pocket spending, but they didn’t appear to increase insulin use.

State insulin caps, which range from $25 to $100 for a month’s supply, were associated with 17.4% relative decrease in consumer out-of-pocket costs,

The savings were over twice as large (40%) among patients using health savings accounts, while patients in states with caps between $25 and $30 were most likely to see a drop in costs.

However, insulin use remained constant for nearly all populations, though it increased for lower-income patients with HSAs in states with $25-$30 caps.

Previous studies found Medicare enrollees’ prescription fills rose after Medicare implemented a new $35 cap on monthly insulin costs.

Not sure why its surprising that those with the lowest income and on government healthcare – Medicare – used more insulin when the price went down. Especially because Researchers said those with private insurance are on average healthier and less likely to need insulin, and they might be less affected by caps because they have more resources to afford the medication.

https://www.axios.com/2024/03/26/insulin-costs-insurance

XX

New FDA Clearance for the Twiist Automated Insulin Delivery System. This is hardware from DEKA Research, and will be brought to market by Sequel Med Tech. Software is Tidepool Loop.

DEKA is the company behind the Segway and a lot of other tech.. it’s founder Dean Kamen invented the first wearable insulin pump decades ago.

The Twiist looks like a small, flat disc. It has a tube. The company says it’s the first drug delivery system that measures both insulin volume and flow with each micro-dose, according to a company press release.1 The system is cleared for use in individuals aged 6 years and older with type 1 diabetes.

I’m set to talk to Sequel Med Tech in April..

https://www.drugtopics.com/view/fda-grants-clearance-to-twiist-automated-insulin-delivery-system-for-t1d

XX

Use of continuous glucose monitoring by patients with type 1 diabetes was associated with lower odds of developing diabetic retinopathy, according to a study recently published in the JAMA Network Open.

Diabetic retinopathy affects the blood vessels in the retina and can cause vision loss and blindness.

One study, published in January 2024, found that 49.8% people with type 1 diabetes in the sample of those with commercial insurance used the devices from 2016 to 2019, up from 20.1% from 2010 to 2013.

Researchers found that use of continuous glucose monitoring was associated with lower the risk of developing diabetic retinopathy, as well as lowering the risk of the disease progressing. They suggested that the use of such technology reduces variability in glucose levels.

One limitation that researchers identified was that they did not assess people with Medicare or Medicaid coverage and this could be an area for future examination.

https://www.managedhealthcareexecutive.com/view/continuous-glucose-monitoring-lowers-risk-of-diabetic-retinopathy

XX

A new analysis pours cold water on the effectiveness of widely used digital diabetes management solutions, stirring up discussion about how best to evaluate the growing market of digital health tools.

Before we go further – and this was buried in most of the article I saw about this – they’re referring not to AID systems or CGM but to eight widely used digital health tools that support people with Type 2 diabetes from DarioHealth, Glooko, Omada, Perry Health, Teladoc (Livongo), Verily (Onduo), Vida Health and Virta Health.

The blistering report, released by the Peterson Health Technology Institute (PHTI), concluded that diabetes monitoring apps “do not deliver meaningful clinical benefits, and result in increased healthcare spending.”

 

It’s the organization’s first analysis since launching in July as an independent evaluator of digital health technologies. The Peterson Center on Healthcare launched the PHTI, with a commitment of $50 million, to assess the clinical benefits and economic impact of digital health solutions along with the offerings’ effects on health equity, privacy and security.

“If health plans or employers are going to be paying extra for these solutions, they have to deliver extra benefit clinically above and beyond what a patient would expect in ‘usual care,'” she said.

https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/digital-health/diabetes-management-tools-not-worth-cost-study-finds-digital-health-companies-push

 

XX

XX

Is a cow going to be our rescue here? A genetically altered brown bovine cow recently made history by producing human insulin in its milk.

The results, published March 12 in Biotechnology JournalTrusted Source, indicate a potential solution for mass-produced insulin, but more research is warranted to confirm these findings. Caution around using genetically modified animals to advance human pharmacology is also needed.

Non-study author Brett M. Sansbury, PhD, principal investigator and leader of discovery research at ChristianaCare’s Gene Editing Institute, commented on the potential implications of this research to Medical News Today:

“Genetic engineering has so much potential for significant advancements in how we understand, diagnose and treat diseases. This study highlights the promise this field has in applications for improving human health. While the researchers here describe the practical challenges they experienced in this proof-of-concept study, the implications for increasing the supply of an essential drug, with the potential to make it more accessible to a wider population suffering from a very prominent disease, could be very impactful.”

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/genetically-altered-cow-produces-human-insulin

XX

 

Join us again soon!

 

Approved last year, Tandem’s Mobi is now widely available. We’re getting an update from Ben Mar, Director of Product Marketing, on the features of the Mobi that make this tiny pump different and we look ahead to what Tandem is working on next. Ben also answers your questions about everything from algorithm updates, international access, and much more

Our previous episode with Ben Mar about Mobi here

All of our episodes about Tandem Diabetes here 

Our episode from 2022 about the Sigi Pump here 

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

Find out more about Moms’ Night Out 

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Learn more about Gvoke Glucagon Gvoke HypoPen® (glucagon injection): Glucagon Injection For Very Low Blood Sugar (gvokeglucagon.com)

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Edgepark Medical Supplies

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

Instagram

Twitter

Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

 

 


This week, one of the pioneers of the DIY movement is turning her attention to exercise. Dana Lewis is partnering with other researchers to create a tool to help you make better and easier decisions around whatever workout you choose. There’s a lot of variability here – big difference between say, weight lifting and long distance running – so this is no easy task. Dana will explain the tools they’re using, the big goals here, and we get to catch up about what she’s using these days to manage her life with T1D which now includes ultramarathoning.

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

Here’s more about the Helmsley grants Stacey mentioned

Here’s more about T1Dexi

Here are our previous episodes with Dana

Find out more about Moms’ Night Out 

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Learn more about Gvoke Glucagon Gvoke HypoPen® (glucagon injection): Glucagon Injection For Very Low Blood Sugar (gvokeglucagon.com)

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Edgepark Medical Supplies

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

Instagram

Twitter

Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

 

 

It’s In the News! A look at the top diabetes stories and headlines happening now. Top stories this week: The annual ATTD conference wraps up with news about CGMs, including new FDA approvals and a look at CGMs outside of the US, new eyedrops are being studied to treat diabetic eye disease and Beyond Type 1 opens applications for their annual Beyond Scholars.

Transcript and links below

Find out more about Moms’ Night Out 

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Learn more about Gvoke Glucagon Gvoke HypoPen® (glucagon injection): Glucagon Injection For Very Low Blood Sugar (gvokeglucagon.com)

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Edgepark Medical Supplies

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

Instagram

Twitter

Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

 

Episode transcription:

Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I’m Stacey Simms and every other Friday I bring you a short episode with the top diabetes stories and headlines happening now.

XX

In the news is brought to you by Edgepark simplify your diabetes journey with Edgepark

XX

Our top story this week…

XX

The ATTD Conference wrapped up earlier this week – that’s the Advanced Technology and Treatments Conference that takes place in Europe. It was in Italy this year. Lots of news and studies from there – we’ll touch on a few, but lots of links to additional reports in the show notes. I also have a link to every story I do feature. Let’s dive in!

From where I sit – NOT in Italy, it seems to me that the two big stories from ATTD are CGM options and patient involvement. The latter has come a long way with more patient voices being included on the conference floor and in studies than years ago.

In terms of CGM.. there are more than 30 in development and we got news about some of those.

First, the established players. Dexcom announces that the FDA approved Stelo – their new CGM meant for people with type 2 who don’t use insulin. We’ve covered that a lot – but the surprise here was that it was okayed for Over the Counter distribution. No pricing info yet.. much more to come.

Dexcom also announced FDA approval for G7 direct to watch connection. That means no smartphone needed – the G7 will transmit directly to Apple Watch. Both Stelo and this feature expected by the end of summer.

Stelo OTC

https://www.bmj.com/content/384/bmj.q611

XX

In terms of studies, new data shows long-term use of an AID system powered by Dexcom CGM can safely maintain improvements in glycemic outcomes for up to two years1.

Real-world evidence demonstrates reduction in severe hypoglycaemia and diabetic ketoacidosis over 12 months in people with Type 1 diabetes using a Dexcom-powered Automated Insulin Delivery (AID) system2.

Also.. new study shows an association between Dexcom CGM usage and a meaningful reduction in HbA1c for people treating their T2D with a GLP-1.

https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20240305323546/en/Dexcom-Showcases-Leadership-in-AID-and-Power-of-Dexcom-CGM-in-Type-2-Diabetes-With-New-Data-at-ATTD

XX

Freestyle Libre releases a similar study, showing that people with Type 2 diabetes using GLP-1 medicines saw a significant improvement in their HbA1C after adding FreeStyle Libre technology. Better HbA1c results were achieved irrespective of GLP-1 duration, GLP-1 type, or insulin therapy type

https://abbott.mediaroom.com/2024-03-06-Real-World-Data-Show-Abbotts-FreeStyle-Libre-R-Systems-and-GLP-1-Medicines-Work-Better-Together-for-People-with-Type-2-Diabetes

XX

Roche debuted its first continuous glucose monitor (CGM) offering that utilizes predictive AI. The company unveiled its Accu-Chek SmartGuide which is an investigational device not yet authorized for sale. Accu-Chek SmartGuide features a 14-day wear time but does require initial calibration.

 

The company reports a mean absolute relative difference (MARD) of 9.2% based on a 48-patient study, according to BTIG analysts. MARD is a measurement of accuracy for CGM, with lower percentages highlighting stronger accuracy. For instance, Dexcom’s G7 previously demonstrated a MARD of 8.2%, while Abbott’s FreeStyle Libre 3 came in at 7.6%.

Roche unveils new CGM tech with predictive AI, outlines diabetes strategy

XX

 

Photo courtesy of i-SENS

The South Korean Ministry of Food and Drug Safety has approved the first locally-developed continuous glucose monitoring device.

The CareSens Air, developed by blood glucose device maker i-SENS, is touted to be the smallest and lightest CGM device available in South Korea. It can also be used for 15 days straight and features a calibration mechanism to make readings more reliable.

CareSens Air is also the fourth CGM device that has been approved by the South Korean government, following approvals for foreign products by Medtronic, Abbott, and Dexcom.

Moreover, i-SENS is currently seeking a CE clearance for its CGM offering, eyeing to market the product in Europe by the first half of 2024.

https://www.mobihealthnews.com/news/asia/south-korea-approves-first-local-cgm-device

XX

As I said, lotta CGM news! Elsewhere..

MannKind Corporation announced initial meal challenge data from INHALE-3 a Phase 4 U.S. clinical trial evaluating inhaled insulin (plus basal) vs. standard of care.

The statistically significant findings included: Subjects utilizing inhaled insulin experienced significantly reduced post-meal hyperglycemia, compared with those who used subcutaneous rapid-acting analogues (RAA) delivered by MDI or pumps Area under the curve (AUC; 180 mg/dL) was reduced by 20%; Inhaled insulin subjects demonstrated significantly lower glucose excursions from baseline; Mean glucose excursions were reduced by 22%; In the inhaled insulin group, mean glucose levels peaked 15 minutes sooner than in the standard of care group despite inhaled insulin being given at start of the meal vs. RAA being administered 5-15 minutes prior to the meal. The 17-week endpoint results from INHALE-3 will be presented Saturday, June 22, during a symposium at the American Diabetes Association?s 84th Scientific Sessions in Orlando.

https://www.marketscreener.com/quote/stock/MANNKIND-CORPORATION-34185045/news/MannKind-Corporation-Announces-INHALE-3-Study-s-Initial-Meal-Challenge-Results-Comparing-Afrezza-H-46141572/

XX

A new eye drop could mean a much simpler solution for diabetic eye disease. Current treatments for diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema are invasive and include medication injections into the eye and laser therapy. New study on the eye drops reported it safe and tolerable.. 100% of people stayed in the study which is significant.

Researchers also reported a significant decrease in central macular thickness after 85 days of use, as well as inhibition of further increases in vascular leakage in study participants using the eye drop

 

“Finding a noninvasive, safe, and efficacious treatment for non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy patients would help prevent progression to more severe disease at an early stage,” he continued.

The new eye drop, called EXN407, is reportedly the first topical treatment for retinal vascular diseases such as diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema.

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/could-an-intervention-as-simple-as-eye-drops-treat-eye-damage-in-diabetes

XX

High-dose of vitamin D analog can prolong the remission period of type 1 diabetes (T1D) by preserving the function of insulin-producing beta cells in newly diagnosed patients.

Researchers conducted a secondary post hoc analysis of a randomized clinical trial looking at residual beta function and vitamin D supplementation in 36 youths (age, 10-21 years; mean age, 13.5 years; 33.3% women) with recently diagnosed T1D.

Participants were randomly assigned to receive vitamin D (50,000 international units) or placebo every week for 2 months and then biweekly for 10 months.

Vitamin D supplementation improved the insulin secretion capacity of beta cells, as observed by the decrease in the mean fasting PI:C ratio compared with placebo (−0.0009 vs 0.0011; P =.01).

The reduction in %ΔAUC of C-peptide was notably slower with vitamin D than placebo (−2.8% vs −4.7%; P =.03), indicating a longer delay in the loss of C-peptide.

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/vitamin-d-supplement-protects-insulin-producing-cells-t1d-2024a10004mb

XX

In the UK. Oxford University researchers are to establish a national registry to track individuals at risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The measure is targeted at those who test positive for diabetes autoantibodies – proteins that indicate potential pancreatic damage and possible future diagnosis of type 1 diabetes.

The expectation is for enrolment into the registry to star later this year.

The registry aims to share information about upcoming treatments and opportunities for participation in research, such as trials of immunotherapy treatments.

 

https://www.oxfordmail.co.uk/news/24178874.oxford-establishing-diabetes-registry-people-at-risk/

XX

Commercial

XX

March 12, 2024 — The Food and Drug Administration announced last week that it will allow yogurt producers to say that regular consumption of their products may prevent Type 2 diabetes, but labels must also include the qualification that this is based on “limited scientific evidence.”

There has been some research that supports this claim, Frank Hu, Fredrick J. Stare Professor of Nutrition and Epidemiology and chair of the Department of Nutrition at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, said in a March 5 New York Times article. For example, a 2014 study by Hu and colleagues found an association between regular consumption of yogurt—but not other forms of dairy—and lowered Type 2 diabetes risk. Hu said in the article that the live bacteria cultures in yogurt may reduce inflammation and insulin resistance.

Yogurt is high in protein, vitamins, and minerals, and can be part of a healthy diet if it’s not loaded with added sugars, Hu said. However, yogurt is unlikely to prevent diabetes on its own, according to Hu and other experts quoted in the article.

To lower diabetes risk, Hu suggested consuming a dietary pattern such as the Mediterranean diet, maintaining a healthy weight, and limiting consumption of products linked to increased diabetes risk, including sugary beverages and processed meats. Yogurt, he noted, is “not a magic bullet.”

Read the New York Times article: Does Eating Yogurt Reduce Your Diabetes Risk?

 

Eating yogurt may help reduce Type 2 diabetes risk

XX

 

Beyond Scholars is a scholarship program designed specifically for the diabetes community.

 

Originally founded as the Diabetes Scholars Foundation in 2008, the program officially became a part of the Beyond Type 1 portfolio in 2018. Beyond Scholars offers scholarships of up to $5,000 for students living with diabetes as they pursue their educational dreams.

 

“Pursuing post-secondary education is no small—or inexpensive—feat, especially if you are a student living with a chronic illness,” says Kristian Hurley,  Senior VP of Programs, Advocacy and Health Equity at Beyond Type 1.. “We are incredibly proud to offer resources to this talented and deserving class of grads, and the many alumni before them.”

 

Since 2008 Beyond Scholars has provided students more than $2 million in scholarship money. Scholarships are made possible by individual and corporate donors.

 

To apply for a scholarship, click here.

 

The deadline for submissions is April 19, 2024.

Beyond Scholars

XX

XX

Join us again soon!