Diabetes Connections Presents

Diabetes Connections TYPE 2

It’s time to expand the conversation!

JDRF is now “Breakthrough T1D” – Behind the rebrand (and other changes)


JDRF… is no more. A rebranding and name change means the organization founded in 1970 by concerned parents will now be known as Breakthrough T1D. You can guess some of the reasons for this change – the “J” for juvenile has long been a turn off for adults living with type 1 – but some of the other reasons are surprising. We’ll do a deep dive into what this means for the community, the fund raising and research, and the organization itself.

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

Stacey’s webinar with Breakthrough T1D Mountain West Chapter

The Breakthrough T1D announcement video 

Find out more about Moms’ Night Out – registration is open for Denver and Philadelphia!

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Learn more about Gvoke Glucagon Gvoke HypoPen® (glucagon injection): Glucagon Injection For Very Low Blood Sugar (gvokeglucagon.com)

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Edgepark Medical Supplies

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

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Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

Diabetes Connections presents Moms’ Night Out!

Announcing THREE new cities! Treat yourself to some time away with other moms who get it.

Recent Episodes

It’s In the News! A look at the top diabetes stories and headlines happening now. Top stories this week: Dexcom goes Direct to Watch in the US, Abbott gets FDA okay for its OTC CGM, new study about metformin during pregnancy, an update on semaglutides, JDRF changes its name, and more!

Find out more about Moms’ Night Out 

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Learn more about Gvoke Glucagon Gvoke HypoPen® (glucagon injection): Glucagon Injection For Very Low Blood Sugar (gvokeglucagon.com)

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Edgepark Medical Supplies

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

Instagram

Twitter

Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

Episode transcription with links:

 

Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I’m Stacey Simms and every other Friday I bring you a short episode with the top diabetes stories and headlines happening now.

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In the news is brought to you by Edgepark simplify your diabetes journey with Edgepark

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Our top story this week – some CGM news…

Dexcom announces Direct to Watch is here in the US.

From the release: Using its own dedicated Bluetooth connection, Dexcom G7 sends glucose information and personalized alerts right to a user’s Apple Watch. Dexcom G7 is the only CGM system that can display glucose on multiple devices simultaneously and independently, including on a smartphone, smart watch, receiver or connected automated insulin delivery system.‡

Apple products are built with strong privacy protections and users have control over their data in the Health app.

(If you like to keep track of these things, we are just over 7 years since the official announcement this was going to happen)

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FDA approves Abbot’s over-the-counter continuous glucose monitoring system. It’s called Lingo and comes a couple of months after Dexcom won clearance for its Stelo over-the-counter CGM. Abbott has been selling Lingo in the UK as more of a lifestyle device – not aimed at people with diabetes. They call it a consumer biowearable designed to help people make decisions about their overall health and wellness; Lingo is not intended for use in diagnosis, treatment or management of a disease or medical condition. No word yet on exactly what kind of app they’ll launch here in the US or if it will be marketed toward people with diabetes like the Libre currently is.. just as an OTC option. While it seems like the same hardware, the company has not confirmed that.

https://www.drugdeliverybusiness.com/abbott-wins-fda-clearance-for-its-lingo-otc-glucose-monitor/

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New study looking at the use of continuous glucose monitors (CGMs by rural children and adolescents living with type 1 diabetes.

Previous studies examining the use of CGMs by children relied on prescription records to identify use of these devices, but just because someone is prescribed a CGM does not mean that they use one; barriers such as cost can stand in the way. this study instead identified use of these devices according to billing codes for the interpretation of CGM readings by the provider.

The results unearthed a sizeable disparity. Those living in rural areas were significantly less likely to use a CGM than those in urban areas, even after adjusting for sex, race or ethnicity and insurance type. Specifically, compared with youth living in urban areas, the use of CGMs was 31% lower for children and adolescents living in small rural towns, and 49% lower for those living in isolated rural towns. The gap between rural and urban patients persisted across the four years of the study, even as the use of CGMs increased for all patient types during this time. These results are also relevant to people with type 2 diabetes who require insulin, Tilden said.

The results also revealed that non-White patients, those who had public insurance and patients who lived in areas with a higher NPI all were less likely to use CGMs.

More research is needed to explore the reasons for these disparities, but Tilden said they likely are a function of such issues as cost, reduced internet access, which CGMs require to relay their data, and distance from clinics and Medicaid-contracted pharmacies.

 

The next step is figuring out how to eliminate those disparities. These researchers are seeking funding to design an intervention that uses telemedicine and partners with a network of 35 clinics across Kansas to deliver specialty care to diabetes patients in rural areas.

 

https://www.kumc.edu/about/news/news-archive/diabetes-monitoring-disparities.html

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Metformin is just as safe to use during pregnancy to treat type 2 diabetes as insulin. The study, which hasn’t been published yet in a peer-reviewed journal, tracked health data and potential long-term side effects of using metformin during pregnancy for up to 11 years postpartum.

While today’s popular GLP-1 medications, such as Ozempic, are not approved yet for use during pregnancy, metformin and insulin have been used during pregnancy for decades.

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/metformin-may-be-as-safe-as-insulin-to-treat-diabetes-during-pregnancy

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Once weekly basal insulin is a no go from an FDA advisory panel. They found the potential benefits of the investigational once-weekly basal insulin analog icodec (Novo Nordisk) don’t outweigh the increased risk for hypoglycemia in people with type 1 diabetes.

We’ve been following this for a long time. Most of the trials here have been in people with type 2 – and the FDA hasn’t publicly raised concerns about efficacy and safety seen in any of those trials.

But the type 1 trial found a significant increase in serious or severe hypoglycemia with icodec compared with degludec (4.66 vs 1.0 events per 100 patient-years; 14 events in nine patients versus three in three patients), with the greatest incidence in the icodec group on days 2-4 after injection. None of the events resulted in treatment discontinuation or study withdrawal.

This doesn’t mean the FDA can’t approve the drug – and the panel mentioned that they hope the FDA would work with Novo Nordisk to – quote – make sure that if this is approved there are as many guardrails as possible to make sure we don’t harm people with type 1 diabetes.”

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/advisory-panel-votes-against-once-weekly-insulin-type-1-2024a10009we

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The shortage of Ozempic and Mounjaro continues… with some doctors offering advice of what to do if you can’t fill your prescription. Health care company Ro recently launched a public crowd-sourced shortage tracker to help patients. The company says they also share the patient-reported shortages to the FDA. Chae says some patients could discuss with their doctor off-label use of other medications, like liraglutide injections (such as Trulicity, for example), depending on their preexisting conditions.

Patients may also consider trying compounded semaglutide. Compounded drugs are made to order in local pharmacies, but Chae says be wary of them: Because of their bespoke nature, the drugs’ safety isn’t regulated by the FDA.

“The state of Mississippi, North Carolina and West Virginia have banned these compounded drugs,” he said.

https://www.scrippsnews.com/health/popular-diet-and-diabetes-drugs-in-short-supply-as-demand-surges

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Commercial

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Big news from JDRF – they’ve changed their name to “Breakthrough T1D.” Here’s the statement: “Breakthrough T1D was selected following a rigorous, data-informed process because it more accurately conveys the nonprofit’s ability to connect with and work on behalf of the entire type 1 diabetes community,”

The median age for a person living with T1D worldwide is 37 years. Only about one in five are aged 20 years or younger, two thirds are aged 20-64 years, and another one in five are aged 65 years or older.

 

The organization was founded in 1970 by parents of children with T1D and was originally called the “Juvenile Diabetes Foundation.” The “research” part was added in 2012 to reflect that aspect of its mission.

We will have much more on this next week – Tuesday’s episode is an interview with JDRF. Oops with Breakthrough T1D.

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/type-1-diabetes-group-grows-jdrf-now-breakthrough-t1d-2024a1000afr

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Android users – heads up! The FDA has approved a hybrid, closed-loop, insulin-delivery Android app. In May, CamDiab, revealed that the CamAPS FX had received approval.

CamAPS FX is approved for people with type 1 diabetes who are two years of age or older, including those who are pregnant.

 

CamAPS FX works in unison with the FreeStyle Libre 3 and the Dexcom G6 to produce a hybrid, closed-loop system that is compatible with the Ypsomed mylife YpsoPump. The app and those pumps are already approved in several other countries.

You may recall that the YspoPump had a partnership with Lilly to bring that pump to the US – but that deal died in 2022. Yspomed is still moving forward to get FDA approval for their pump.

https://beyondtype1.org/fda-approves-camaps-fx-hybrid-closed-loop-insulin-delivery-app/?fbclid=IwZXh0bgNhZW0CMTEAAR137RhLAt2GfIJ_BBYMrhU2R-maQ0EQmwOFhPfKN9iCnG2BKWY6dEB0sTk_aem_ATLPk1xWOnLNzPz7LvYINbTdCVMZk7pcRmma2pgG5MIo0OfinomTSgjsTsTpW_fE6GNVRnScZS6UGzaTvP1SewNW

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Driven by payments for diabetes treatments — especially insulin — prescription drugs for metabolic diseases now make up nearly one quarter of total national pharmaceutical spending, reported a study of spending trends by therapeutic class.

The detailed examination of a decade’s worth of US drug spending also found changes in who pays for the medicines, with an overall drop in out-of-pocket costs, except in the metabolic disease category. The findings add to concerns about the costs of US diabetes treatments.

Annual US spending on diabetes medicines surged from $27.2 billion in 2011 to $89.2 billion in 2020,  according to this paper was published online in Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy.

In the same period, total annual pharmaceutical spending rose at a far slower rate.

Yet much of the persistent gain in the cost of diabetes treatments in this same period was due to a decades-old drug, insulin, a cornerstone of diabetes care.

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/study-raises-concerns-about-rising-cost-diabetes-meds-2024a1000a8e

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The number of people aged over 16 with insulin-dependent diabetes and eating disorder symptoms is as high as one in four, a study has revealed. Researchers from the University of Eastern Finland examined the findings from 45 past studies, looking at data from almost 11,600 people with insulin-dependent diabetes. They say that understanding the extent of the issue is the first step in developing treatment pathways, citing Finland as an example of a country which does not have care pathways for people with both diabetes and eating disorders. Of course, neither does the US.

Typical eating disorder symptoms include restricting food intake and binge eating. Symptoms particular to insulin-dependent diabetes include insulin omission, which is when individuals restrict or skip insulin doses due to fears of putting on weight.

The prevalence of eating disorder symptoms was higher in women than in men, a finding previously made in young people too.

The age of an individual was not found to be a factor, with eating disorders occurring regardless of age group.

https://www.diabetes.co.uk/news/2024/jun/1-in-4-people-with-insulin-dependent-diabetes-have-eating-disorder-symptoms-research-shows.html

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Congrats to Kate Farnsworth who recently won Diabetes Action Canada Catalyst for Change award. Many of you know Kate from the early DIY days..

Kate Farnsworth is the patient partner co-lead for the Innovations in Type-1 Diabetes Program. Kate has been heavily involved in the Do-It-Yourself #wearenotwaiting movement since her daughter Sydney was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of 8. With a background in information technology and graphic design, Kate has lent her skillset to developing diabetes watch faces for remote monitoring used by patients worldwide. Kate has created an online patient-driven support community for people who are exploring DIY closed-loop solutions and continues to advocate for all people with diabetes to have access to the best tools to manage their diabetes.

Very nice to see this award go to someone very well deserved.

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Join us again soon!

Listen Now!

We’ve been hearing about smart insulin for a long time. This refers to an insulin that would react to glucose levels and adjust by itself with no external device, like a CGM, needed. You’d inject and let the insulin do the work.

I’m talking to Sensulin CEO Mike Moradi about where their version of this amazing sounding technology stands, his family connections that really feeds his passion here, and what has to happen to get glucose-responsive insulin into the hands of people who could benefit.

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

GlucosePATH uses computer science and clinical data to evaluate every possible treatment option, using data from the patient, FDA, and peer-reviewed journals, in just a few seconds. It was created by computer scientist Len Testa and endocrinologist Dr. Bradly Eilerman.

Len Testa is also co host of the fabulous Disney Dish podcast and the creator of Touring Plans the app and service of The Unofficial Guides to Walt Disney World, Disneyland and Disney Cruise Line. Testa is all about the math of theme parks – his guides are there to maximize the magic as he says – to make your waits shorter and save money – and it’s all based on calculations from his team.

Disney very recently made some changes to their Disability Access Services program – often referred to as a DAS pass at Disney World and Disney Land. We’re going to talk about why this happened, what it means for you, and what else is going on at Disney.

Note: this interview was taped BEFORE the changes took place.

More about Len Testa’s Touring Plans here

More about the DAS changes here

We’re also spending some time talking about a new service for doctors called Glucosepath and about a new surprising study about cortisol and diabetes. I’ll also explain how these two guests can talk about all of these issues..

Dr. Eilerman also talks about the Catalyst study which looks at people with type 2 diabetes and measures cortisol.

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Learn about Dexcom 

Check out US MED

Find out more about CeQur Simplicity

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

We have a monthly newsletter! Sign up today (no spam we promise) 

Here’s where to find us:

YouTube (new!)

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Threads

Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

Check out this episode!

Disney very recently made some changes to their Disability Access Services program – often referred to as a DAS pass at Disney World and Disney Land. We’re going to talk about why this happened, what it means for you, and what else is going on at Disney.

Note: this interview was taped BEFORE the changes took place.

More about Len Testa’s Touring Plans here

More about the DAS changes here

We’re also spending some time talking about a new service for doctors called Glucosepath and about a new surprising study about cortisol and diabetes. I’ll also explain how these two guests can talk about all of these issues..

Len Testa is co host of the fabulous Disney Dish podcast and the creator of Touring Plans the app and service of The Unofficial Guides to Walt Disney World, Disneyland and Disney Cruise Line. Testa is all about the math of theme parks – his guides are there to maximize the magic as he says – to make your waits shorter and save money – and it’s all based on calculations from his team.

He teamed up with endocrinologist Dr. Bradly Eilerman to create GlucosePATH which uses computer science and clinical data to evaluate every possible treatment option, using data from the patient, FDA, and peer-reviewed journals, in just a few seconds.

Dr. Eilerman also talks about the Catalyst study which looks at people with type 2 diabetes and measures cortisol.

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

Find out more about Moms’ Night Out – registration is open for Denver!

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Learn more about Gvoke Glucagon Gvoke HypoPen® (glucagon injection): Glucagon Injection For Very Low Blood Sugar (gvokeglucagon.com)

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Edgepark Medical Supplies

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

Instagram

Twitter

Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

Check out this episode!

This week, creating a bihormonal pump – using insulin and glucagon in one device – has been the goal of Beta Bionics since before the company even had that name. Now that they’ve launched the insulin-only version of their iLet, we’re getting an update on the dual chambered version. The big news is a new agreement with Xeris to supply that shelf-stable glucagon. But there are still a lot of questions. We’re talking to the CEOs of both companies.

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

Find out more about Moms’ Night Out – registration is open for Denver!

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners – they help make the show possible!

Learn more about Gvoke Glucagon Gvoke HypoPen® (glucagon injection): Glucagon Injection For Very Low Blood Sugar (gvokeglucagon.com)

Omnipod – Simplify Life

Learn about Dexcom 

Edgepark Medical Supplies

Check out VIVI Cap to protect your insulin from extreme temperatures

Learn more about AG1 from Athletic Greens 

Drive research that matters through the T1D Exchange

The best way to keep up with Stacey and the show is by signing up for our weekly newsletter:

Sign up for our newsletter here

Here’s where to find us:

Facebook (Group)

Facebook (Page)

Instagram

Twitter

Check out Stacey’s books!

Learn more about everything at our home page www.diabetes-connections.com 

Reach out with questions or comments: info@diabetes-connections.com

Check out this episode!

Order Stacey’s Books!

Order now and Stacey will sign your copy!
Stacey Simms is back with more heartfelt stories and honest advice about raising a happy, healthy child with type 1 diabetes. Stacey’s son was diagnosed just before he turned two. He’s in his senior year of high school now! In her sequel to the award winning “World’s Worst Diabetes Mom,” Stacey takes on the challenge of giving a child with diabetes more independence while keeping them safe and happy. It’s not easy, but you are not alone!

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Behind the Scenes with Stacey

Stacey Simms is the host and producer of Diabetes Connections. She’s also an author, speaker, and voice-over artist. Stacey spent more than 20 years in local TV and radio broadcasting, mostly working very early morning hours. Stacey’s been sharing her family’s story with type 1 diabetes since her son’s diagnosis in 2006. Read her blog, find speaker reviews and audio samples at our partner website.

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